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  • #979097
    Avataroutsidelogic
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      Hey everyone, I’m trying linocuts for the first time. For my first try at printing, I was pretty pleased with first one, but I just re-inked the block and tried printing again, and it was a mess. Is this just a matter of me applying too much ink the 2nd time, or does the ink normally sink into the grooves, requiring that I rinse the block after each print?

      Thanks for passing along any sage advice :)

      First try:

      Second print :confused:

      I did try rinsing the block in between prints, but the lines seemed to get fuzzier, even though I dried the block. Is that expected for a lino block? Does it absorb any water, and need to thoroughly dry before I print with it again?

      First print detail:

      Subsequent print, after rinsing the block:

      Glenn

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      #981750
      AvatarBeLing
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        What a really nice image!
        Okay, so how are you printing it? Press? Spoon?

        I don’t clean between prints. The ink should be pretty thin, with that nice slick sound when you roll it out, so often, my first print will be the lightest, then the plate “grabs” the ink better. I only use oil ink, which I think works the best.

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        #981748
        Avataroutsidelogic
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          Thanks for the response. I’m using a wooden spoon, pretty heavy paper (Legion Stonehenge…ordered it years ago for some ink drawings and never used it), and Speedball water soluble ink. So maybe I just loaded it up with too much ink that second time…?

          Also, thanks for the kind words on the image. It’s based on Carey Mulligan’s character in the movie Mudbound.

          Glenn

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          #981751
          AvatarAnonymous

            I certainly wouldn’t consider myself an expert, but I’ve had problems like that from over inking, and from ink of the wrong consistency.

            When inking my brayer I can hear two distinctly different sounds. One is good, sharper and quieter. The other is bad sounding sloppier and louder and indicates too much ink. When it’s over inked the surface of the rolled out ink also looks uneven and inconsistent.

            I find oil based inks more forgiving when trying to make a number of consistent prints, although I’ve only tried a very few different types of ink (Speedball water based, Gamblin & Hanco oil based)

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            #981749
            Avataroutsidelogic
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              Thanks, @Schumath. I’m sort of avoiding oil-based inks at the moment, because my printing “studio” is basically the family kitchen, and I don’t want the mess and smell in there that I assume goes along with oils.

              But I will try a round of prints with being more judicious about the amount of ink I use. I guess it’s something you get the feel for after a while.

              Glenn

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