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Old 01-26-2012, 12:44 PM
theBoardLady theBoardLady is offline
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

I'm joining the fun, I hope you all don't mind. I've got my Texas cowboy boots on and started on my painting. It's on a 5X5 stretched canvas. I don't like that it shows the texture of the canvas but I'm hoping as we move further along, it will be covered up.

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Old 01-26-2012, 04:15 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Jim,

Thanks so much for doing this. Don't know if I'll have time to jump in, but certainly will watch. I'm still catching up on threads and posts after our winter snowmageddon out here.
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:28 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Finally got my homework done. Mixed utlra blue with aliz permanent, and touch of hansa yellow, no white used. But basically a violet color. Same color used throughout, but some areas have more aliz, some areas a bit bluer, because I had to mix several times to get enough paint. Accidentally painted over the highlight on apple, I wanted to leave white of canvas for that..oh well.

While I had the paints out, made a quick color chart. Something I've been wanting to do for some time, but Jims class gave me the final motivation to quit procrastinating. Just a small, quick one, but will come in handy in the future.
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:58 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Here are my color charts Jim. The first square is traditional.. The others are gradations of combinations. The squares are white but the outline is magenta. I use a magenta wash so I do my charts with that in mind. But I never thought to ask if that is a good practice. Is it, or should I just do them with white backing?

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Old 01-28-2012, 02:55 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

I know I'm over analyzing this and making it a lot harder than it has to be, but I am seriously struggling just to get the background done. I can't figure out how to just lay down the background. I didn't like how the brush marks were showing and I had it too dark so I overworked the crap out of it and finally gave up and wiped the whole thing off. I bought plenty of canvas boards just in case so once I sit here and chill out for a little while, I'll give it another try. What makes me the maddest is that I had the image drawn on perfectly and now I have to start over. Grrr! (I ain't giving up tho...I'm gonna learn oils if it kills me! )
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Old 01-28-2012, 10:58 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Okay, totally not happy with it but here it is. I used a smooth board thing I got at hobby lobby and I like it alot better than the canvas textured stuff. My main issue is that every time I put my brush against a painted area, it would lift the paint off and I would get a light mark. I finally gave up and left it alone before I ended up wiping it off like the last attempt. I think I'm gonna like working in oil once I figure out all the nuances




sorry about the glare that looks like a sunset in the middle. I've realized that the lighting in my studio is really, crappy.
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Old 01-30-2012, 10:04 AM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

I better start teaching or this class will get out of hand. Great to see all the interest and participation. Lets take a look at the first round of assignments.
Here is everyones work and the B&W reference in one shot.


I am going to deal with 2 issues: value and technique. I will let you self critique your drawing accuracy.

Value: I have taught a lot of classes and I find that one of the more difficult things is to get the contrast that is actually represented in the subject. People will often paint everything too dark or too light. In either case you have a lack of contrast. This is where squinting really helps. It will help you see the relationships of value over the entire subject not just one localized area.

Next to drawing (which is essentially learning to see and draw shapes), seeing values is the next most important skill the realist painter needs. Light hitting an object and the objects shadow is how we experience our world on a daily basis. So if you learn to see and communicate values in your painting, you are making it believable.

I think a big problem artist have is we pre-judge the entire piece with each brush stroke. With every brush stoke you put down you have just created a relationship of value and color to the rest of the canvas. The artist judges the entire work based on the first few strokes and says "that doesn't look good" and they re work it and in the process lessen the contrast. They proceed through the entire painting like this and end up with a painting that is too light or too dark.

When you identify an area and lay down that dark or light value, you have to trust that it will make the object look real in the end. The painting should not look all that great until you have established all of the value relationships on the entire canvas.

Now look at your work in just B&W values. You should be able to see identify where you need adjustment.


To further help here is the reference with a gray scale overlay. I have identified some of the areas with the value from the scale. I have made this scale in PhotoShop and printed it out. I have holes punched out like you see here so I can lay it over a photo to help identify values. I also have the same scale under my glass palette so I can the colors I mix right on top of it. You can buy scales similar to this if you don't have the necessary tools to make one.


So with this info, rework your painting as you see fit.

FYI this is a separate painting from the next assignment that will be done in color. So when you paint in color you will have this piece as a value study to look at.

I also want to commend everyone for their hard work. Painting is hard to learn but it is not out of reach for anyone who is willing to stick with it. I honestly believe that it is just a matter of learning to improve one simple step at a time. If you can draw a stick figure and see some way to improve it then you can just keep making improvements and learning more day after day and then year after year, you can get somewhere. Just learn to have fun at every stage or you will get discouraged.

I will write a separate post about technique later today.
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Old 01-30-2012, 04:06 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

thanks Jim, that value scale helps alot and I just realized I have one sitting on top of my Yudu that I forgot I had. I also realize that my values are WAY to light and somewhere along the line I turned my Delicious apple into a Fuji!
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Old 01-30-2012, 09:30 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Ugh.. This was harder then I thought it would be.. a lot of glare as its still real wet. Jim, I learned bunches! I think the most helpful was to use mostly transparent shadows.

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Old 01-30-2012, 09:32 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

I was hoping to comment more on technique but I have been swamped all day.

But I will say this. Donna, it looks like you are probably having trouble because you are thinning the paint and everything is getting too wet. Try just painting with paint and make sure your brush is dry of any solvents. If your value is too dark then you can scrub some of it off with a rag or dry brush. If you really need to get paint off you can scrub with a brush dipped in a little mineral spirits.

A lot of technique is learned by just painting and seeing what works for you.

Catherine those color charts look great. What you learn in the process of doing them is as important as having them for future reference.
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Old 01-30-2012, 10:34 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Quote:
Originally Posted by jim56
Donna,Try just painting with paint and make sure your brush is dry of any solvents.

Good to know! I was going at it like watercolor painting
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Old 01-31-2012, 11:56 AM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Catherine, I guess we were posting about the same time. Your painting is wonderful. You even got that little reflected light in the shadow at the bottom of the apple. Most people get that too light. Cough! (A warning to the rest.)

The napkin looks more real than a real napkin. Not sure what else to say. It is terrific. You seem to really understand the whole values thing.

I think your next step is to consider edges. Things closer tend to have sharper edges and further are softer. Round spherical objects (horse butts) are usually softer as they pick up reflected light/color from the sky or other sources of reflected or diffused light.

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Old 01-31-2012, 08:29 PM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Quote:
Originally Posted by jim56

I think your next step is to consider edges. Things closer tend to have sharper edges and further are softer. Round spherical objects (horse butts) are usually softer as they pick up reflected light/color from the sky or other sources of reflected or diffused light.

I'm not sure how to do that with the oils Jim. Your paintings have the effect.. But how do I get there from here? Never had any instruction with oils so most painting is an adventure with fingers crossed. I see you use the brush to fuzz it. But do you use a mix of medium or just lightly brush the edge to pull it out and fuzz it? The apple looks so stark against the gray floor.. How would you fuzz it?
Off to find fuzzy round objects..
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Old 02-01-2012, 03:53 AM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Quote:
It s beautiful! I would nt paint that blue board,
wb
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Old 02-01-2012, 07:56 AM
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Re: Oil Painting In Cowboy Boots 101

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine1
Never had any instruction with oils so most painting is an adventure with fingers crossed.

I feel the same way. I think one of the harder things for me is to be sensitive to the paint. Meaning: having an awareness of the consistency of the paint, how thick is it on the canvas, how much paint is in your brush. If I am painting one color over another how will they affect each other. The more aware you are of all of this the more you are able to control the paint. I think this just takes time painting and paying attention when you are.

But to give you some sort of real answer to how to achieve soft edges there are lots of things to try. After painting a hard edge of one color, wipe your brush off and slide the edge of that color into the adjacent color. The Mongoose brushes will do this with a softer feel. You can try smearing and edge with a rag. If the paint is set up a bit you can dry brush a soft edge—with very little color in the brush drag it from one color to the next. You can also mix the two adjacent colors on the palette and take a swipe horizontal with the edge to create transition.

You really have to experiment. I often have trouble with this so I have no one way that works every time.

So how is everyone else doing? If you have any questions don't hesitate to ask. If you want to join us it is never too late. This class will proceed based on your posting of your work and questions you have about it.
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