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Old 11-03-2011, 12:58 AM
John Stirrips John Stirrips is offline
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Re: Using colour to 'turn' an object

In relation to colored light and its influence on the subject. A white object under an orangy light will have an orangish hue on the side receiving the most light and the dark side will not only be darker but will also have very little to to no orange in the make up of its hue: the hue will therefore be much closer to neutral or maybe completely neutral (given no reflected light), or even a touch of blue (orange's complementary) could be added, simply to build the drama, contrasting with the warmer orange hue on the lighter side.

This same idea could be done if the say the object is naturally blue under a yellow light. The lighter side of the object will be lighter and pulled towards yellow, giving it a green tinge.

But what happens if the object is naturally blue and the light is orange. The lighter side of the object will of course be lighter, but if orange is added to the mix, won't this neutralise the blue. Isn't this a recipe for muddy color? What happens in this situation and how do you do it without creating a grey for the light side. Or am I missing something?

By the way, I'm talking about painting (not photoshop).. Thanks
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Old 11-03-2011, 04:35 AM
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Einion Einion is offline
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I've split this question off to a new thread also John.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Stirrips
In relation to colored light and its influence on the subject. A white object under an orangy light will have an orangish hue on the side receiving the most light and the dark side will not only be darker but will also have very little to to no orange in the make up of its hue: the hue will therefore be much closer to neutral or maybe completely neutral (given no reflected light), or even a touch of blue (orange's complementary) could be added, simply to build the drama, contrasting with the warmer orange hue on the lighter side.
Full-on neutral shadows wouldn't be seen in any sort of normal setup, unless the object itself is very grey to begin with.

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Originally Posted by John Stirrips
But what happens if the object is naturally blue and the light is orange. The lighter side of the object will of course be lighter, but if orange is added to the mix, won't this neutralise the blue. Isn't this a recipe for muddy color?
Yes, this would neutralise the blue (how much will depend on the colour of both the object and the light, and the mix of wavelengths that make up the light).

The term 'muddy' is a pejorative, and really it's not very apt when it comes to talking about lower-chroma colour since it so strongly implies near-greys or even browns, rather than just duller versions of something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Stirrips
What happens in this situation and how do you do it without creating a grey for the light side.
A greyer lit side might be entirely appropriate. It might not be actually grey, but it'll certainly be lower in chroma in the situation you describe.

Incidentally the visual complement to blues varies across a spectrum, along with the hue of the blue itself - for some blues the complement is yellow, despite how paradoxical this might sound.

Einion
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:38 PM
John Stirrips John Stirrips is offline
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Re: Colored light and its influence on the subject

Thanks Einion.

That's fantastic. You're really good at what you do.
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Old 11-04-2011, 02:28 PM
Steve Orin Steve Orin is offline
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Re: Colored light and its influence on the subject

E's input is right on & amplifies what I've said about mixes often not looking right on the pallet. You won't see the results till you put the puzzle together - place the mixes in place, a bit at a time. Mixing is a matter of applying theory, testing, adjusting till it works in the painting.

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