WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Sculpture
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #271   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-07-2011, 03:25 PM
sculpturedolls sculpturedolls is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,914
 
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Great! Only 11 more likes and I'll be on my way with that page!
__________________
~Sculpturedolls
Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, fill your life with love,scatter sunshine, forget self, think of others. -Norman Vincent Peale

My website My Blog Join me on Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #272   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-17-2012, 10:32 AM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

I'm frustrated. Bronze is so expensive to cast and in this economy, I need some less-expensive stuff to sell. Resin is useful but doesn't have a 'quality" feel in the hand that fired clay does (especially when you've done that clay, SD!) I'm seriously considering getting some water-based clay to make some relief tiles. I can make a plaster mold - even a rubber mold (that might work better - it would pull off the original and castings easier) and pushing clay into that mold to reproduce the tiles. How crazy does that sound? I don't own a kiln. A local sculpture supplier has fired things for me in the past, but I'm even pondering getting a kiln. Trouble is, I'd like to play with silver clay which requires a different kind of kiln than terra cotta does. Guess I'm looking for advice, information, something . . . Ideas?

Haven't been in the studio since before I pulled that muscle in my back. I want to get back to work but none of my existing projects interest me. Argh.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #273   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-17-2012, 11:44 AM
sculpturedolls sculpturedolls is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,914
 
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

You'll have a bit of a learning curve with clay, but then you said you've worked with it before. For affordable, clay is a good way to go. I say go for it if it's exciting you to do so. I could just see ceramic horse relief's that you'd do. They'd be beautiful! You could finish them with washes of color and let the natural clay show through.

Or you could use hydrostone. It looks a lot like how some clays look when they have just a black stain wash. Some of my reliefs look so much like hydrostone, (in yet they are ceramic), that I wondered why I took the effort to make them in ceramic when it would have been so much easier to just pour hydrostone in the mold.
__________________
~Sculpturedolls
Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, fill your life with love,scatter sunshine, forget self, think of others. -Norman Vincent Peale

My website My Blog Join me on Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #274   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-17-2012, 02:02 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

I wondered about hydrostone and Winterstone too. If there's sanding required, I can't do it. My carpal tunnel won't allow it. But if there's no sanding required . . . hydrostone just cures in the mold like resin does, right?

I've done lots of horse reliefs but always in resin. I'd like to do something different, something classy looking and something that isn't expensive.

I do remember how to work with water-based clay. I've never done any firing myself, so the idea of owning a kiln is a bit daunting. Guess I'll keep having the sculpture supply place fire them for me as long as they're open. The couple who own it are probably in their 70s now and I worry that they'll want to retire at some point and will close it - sure hope they don't!
Sculpture supply stores are few and far between! They mostly do potters stuff rather than sculpting stuff, but they do have some sculpting stuff too, and I like to hold tools in my hand before buying rather than ordering them.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #275   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-17-2012, 09:51 PM
Gaffette Gaffette is offline
Senior Member
Pennsylvania
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 194
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Have you ever used fiber glass? My SO worked for a place that did fiberglass sculpture for commissions and the could finish them like any material out there. Just thought I would throw it out there just in case.

Oh and hello. Been lurking a bit here in this part of the forum, I usually stick in the glass section but I am a glass sculptor so I keep popping in here and randomly posting. Anyway, how does one go about getting a crit in this part of the site. Do I just start a thread asking for one or is there a designated 3-d crit area?
Kris
__________________
"I've been wrong on more occasions than I'd like to recognize, but there's room in our vocation if we read between the lines." F.M.
Reply With Quote
  #276   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-17-2012, 09:57 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Welcome to the Sculpture board! Just post a thread and ask for a crit - easy-peasy!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #277   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 12:01 PM
sculpturedolls sculpturedolls is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,914
 
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Lynda- I haven't used hydrostone or winterstone but have learned that they cure in the mold, much like plaster. You'll have to touch up seam lines and that could require sanding and smoothing depending on how good the mold is.

I think that these two products would be more classy than resin. Anything plastic-y gives a feeling of cheap-o.

Working with clay is going to be more work in my estimation, thus more costly to the buyer. But.... clay is more valuable to the buyer too.

Gaffette- Post a thread when you want a critique and those that are moved to comment and throw in their two cents will do so. It's not a structured thing, just everybody helps everybody else.
__________________
~Sculpturedolls
Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, fill your life with love,scatter sunshine, forget self, think of others. -Norman Vincent Peale

My website My Blog Join me on Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #278   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 03:06 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

I'll only be doing reliefs in water-based clay - I'm not good at making 3-D molds, but I can make open-faced ones with no trouble. (I know HOW, but I'm not adept at it.) I'm going to buy some water-based clay tomorrow. I'd like to have a soft sautillo-tile color to it, and then "enhance"' it with that white powdery look here and there - how do you do that? If you don't know what I'm talking about, let me know and I'll try to find a pic of something like that to show you.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #279   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 03:22 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Hmm, haven't found a pic like what I'm thinking of. Mainly what I want is for the pieces I make to be sturdy enough to be outdoors but for them not to have their detail hidden by the thickness of glazes. Unless I make simpler shapes, of course - then the glaze could be part of the art.

I've been needing a kick in the butt to spark my interest again (frustrated by the slow economy!) I can make stuff that will be less expensive and perhaps more abstract if I'm working in a different medium . . . and I love some of the glazes I've seen. Advice is welcome! Going to the sculpture supply house tomorrow morning after a dr. appt in the area. I'll pick their brains too. (I've done that with them many times over the years!)

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #280   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 05:16 PM
sculpturedolls sculpturedolls is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,914
 
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Great to have someone join us in the water clay sculpting category.

Um, about the white powdering finish, I think I know what you're talking about but a pic would be nice to clarify. Don't you think that Ron Young patinas have some finishes for that look? Only problem thing is that you might as well have used hydrostone etc. if you use a finish that completely coats the surface- no one will tell the difference unless you turn it over and show them it's clay.

I know you said you don't want to coat the detail with glaze. You can also do washes of glaze for some color. You don't have to apply three coats. Then after that, you can do more washes of color with oils or acrylics and then seal (for outdoor use).

If you fire hot enough, then the clay will vitrify and can be outdoors without trouble and without a sealer but I think it would still be good to apply sealer. Problem is, the more vitrified the surface, the more washes of color won't sink in at all but stay right on top of the surface. The surface won't be porous anotherwords.

Well, you learn as you go and I know this is great for a new boost! Economy's looking up though, spread the word! Let's create positive energy and more and more will think all is good and this will boost the economy. Don't ya think the news has had the biggest detriment to the economy? If none of us had heard of how terrible everything was, is, whatever, then we all wouldn't have stopped spending etc. etc.!!!!!

Let us know how the trip to the ceramic shop goes.
__________________
~Sculpturedolls
Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, fill your life with love,scatter sunshine, forget self, think of others. -Norman Vincent Peale

My website My Blog Join me on Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #281   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 05:25 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

The white powdery finish isn't all over, it's just touches here and there. Makes the piece look antique, to my mind, anyway. I'll let you know what they tell me at Cornell's (the sculpture supply place)!

And from your mouth to God's ear about the economy! I usually think positive, but my trophy jobs dried up this year. The few folks who contacted me about them disappeared as soon as they heard the price (which isn't high for a custom trophy - $200 for a wall plaque with a resin relief and 15 or more annual plates as well as the big name plate). I've sold a TON of trophies at that price point, but this year? Zip, zilch, nada. *sigh*
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #282   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 05:35 PM
sculpturedolls sculpturedolls is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,914
 
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Here's hoping that the economy has hit rock bottom and that now it's coming up. With the new pres. election coming up that gets people hopeful. Also, approaching spring and summer always gets people on a positive. All we need is for the other countries to not take a dive because that effects us too and we all can tumble. This interconnecting world society is kinda a shaky idea I think. But it is our new reality.

Your prices sound very reasonable to me. Yep, things must be tight for those people inquiring.

I think I know what you mean about the type of patina. I've seen hot patinas with that look where the crevices are whitish and then transclucent on the high points. You could try doing that with clay with a test piece. Probably be good to seal the ceramic so that the white paint will pool in the crevices and not completely soak in. And you could wipe of the color on the high points. If not sealed then the color would be uniformly soaked into the clay and not wipe off.

I know you are a positive person for sure. Love that about you!
__________________
~Sculpturedolls
Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, fill your life with love,scatter sunshine, forget self, think of others. -Norman Vincent Peale

My website My Blog Join me on Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #283   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-18-2012, 05:47 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Awwww, thanks! You're so sweet!!

The white coating I'm thinking of looks like it was put on with a nearly dry sponge (maybe) and it's just softly spotted on, not painted. I'm not too good at painting, although I did a good job with the glazes I used on the big mural I did for that school years ago (a Caribbean reef with fish). I didn't realize you could thin the glazes. That might be a way to go. I do want people to understand it's terra cotta (what do you call your clay sculptures? Terra cotta, clay, what? I need to learn this stuff!!)
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #284   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-19-2012, 02:12 PM
sculpturedolls sculpturedolls is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,914
 
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

When I've called my sculptures "terra-cotta," people so often think of red clay instead of the literal translation- fired earth or fired clay. I love the sound of the word, though, but will use it now, only when I sculpt with reddish clay.

I either label my work "ceramic", sometimes clarify and say "low-fired ceramic", or other times "stoneware"- if it is. Stoneware has a neat sound to it and people like the strength associated with it. Another word people like and makes them think quality is "porcelain." Of course, if it is porcelain then I may choose to use that word rather than just say ceramic.

Sometimes I say clay but that gives more the connotation of unfired clay, at least to me it does. But that is an option too.

__________________
~Sculpturedolls
Keep your heart free from hate, your mind from worry, live simply, expect little, give much, fill your life with love,scatter sunshine, forget self, think of others. -Norman Vincent Peale

My website My Blog Join me on Facebook
Reply With Quote
  #285   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-19-2012, 02:15 PM
ArtsyLynda's Avatar
ArtsyLynda ArtsyLynda is offline
WC! Guide
OH USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,581
 
Hails from United States
Re: The Sculptor's Stand

Okay, forget that white coating. I bought white clay! It's a low-fire clay (5-6, IIRC) with a bit of grog in it because the version of it without grog has 13% shrinkage. I was DELIGHTED to see the store has been purchased by a young woman in her 30s, from the look of her. The couple who owned it were in their 70s and I was worried the store would close when they retired. Now they're retired, the new owner is full of ideas and energy and is offering classes (in pottery so far - but she was looking for a sculpture teacher, so I might have a job offer to consider, and I don't know when I'd have time to do it! LOL And it's been a LONG time since I did water based clay, so I need to get some practice in before I even consider such a thing). I'm excited about starting - I've had two ideas for sculptures of my cat Jared as well as some horse reliefs. We'll see how things turn out . . . I'll keep you posted!
__________________
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:09 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.