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View Poll Results: What does your WC palette look like?
Don't know - can't see it under the surface! 61 27.48%
Spotless, new paint with each new work. 33 14.86%
Each colour individually kept - in ice trays or similar. Each cleaned after use. 32 14.41%
I use any surface I can to lay my paints on. My dog wants his dish back! 32 14.41%
I only use formal art materials and have an orderly palette. 67 30.18%
Use paint straight out of the tubes. Who needs a palette? 5 2.25%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 222. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-26-2002, 09:26 PM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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Talking What does YOUR WC palette look like?

This is an oldie (2002) but goodie that continues to be a great resource on palettes. The poll is long over, but the sharing continues.

What does your watercolour palette look like?
I was amazed to see a sample of Rod's lessons with each colour mixing done on a clean palette, and he knew which each colour was!! I am eager to teach, but will have to re-think my palette for it. I know I'm capable of a clean palette, but doing it is another matter.
This is a photo of my palette(s). The flat palette at the back is the 'oldest' from early 2000 (that's when I started doing my watercolours). I don't want to wash it off, as I might 'lose' a favourite colour - especially if one was in a tube that has dried out. I did empty all my colours into ice cube trays at one stage. I never used them.
If I squeeze out more than I need, I can't see wasting it, so my palette just grows & grows. For the miniatures I paint, and even my larger work I never have to open new tubes. It is amazing how many paintings can be made from so few colours. There are still possibly 100 paintings here, so why wash them clean away?
I can't bear to lose the stomped on cake of cobalt blue that cost me more than a meal out, so it's there on the plate.
Rod ... what's your secret?
Are there others out there like you?
Are there others worse than me?
I'd love to know!
(Thought I'd throw this topic in for fun ... hope you'll treat it as such! )
Regards,
Jillian
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Old 12-26-2002, 09:36 PM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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PS: The 2 recent paintings I did came from using these palette(s).
I squeezed out a little black for the dog 16x20", but no extra colours for the sunset (5x7").
That's why I say there are MANY more paintings here!
Regards,
Jillian
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Old 12-26-2002, 11:04 PM
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Nandie Nandie is offline
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Well, I've only been doing water colors since August '02 so I don't know much, but my "Art Mentor" told me it was quite acceptable to squeeze my tubes of Winsor & Newton paints onto my pallette and use them after they had dried out. So I never waste dried paint, I just use them like "pan" paints, I guess, just dabbing at them with a wet brush to moisten and get the color I want. It works fine for me. I understand that other artists don't seem to think that's a good idea, but so far I fail to understand why???
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Old 12-26-2002, 11:12 PM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nandie
Well, I've only been doing water colors since August '02 so I don't know much, but my "Art Mentor" told me it was quite acceptable to squeeze my tubes of Winsor & Newton paints onto my pallette and use them after they had dried out. So I never waste dried paint, I just use them like "pan" paints, I guess, just dabbing at them with a wet brush to moisten and get the color I want. It works fine for me. I understand that other artists don't seem to think that's a good idea, but so far I fail to understand why???
I have heard many 'rules' re art throughout my life.
I am sure there is NO right or wrong re it being a good idea or not!
Some of my earliest rules I was told was ... never use a ruler.
Why? If you want a straight line, rule it!
Never use an eraser. Why? I'm not perfect, so I need to!
Never use white paint if you're using watercolour? Why? If I need a highlight, as long as it's white water colour, why not?
Never use a grid or other means to assist your work? Why? This was an artist's trade secret for many centuries. Durer & others used them all the time. (I use one rarely, but I do/have.)
Same as I won't condemn anyone for having a messy or clean palette.

Regards,
Jillian
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Old 12-26-2002, 11:25 PM
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taghera taghera is offline
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Heres mine Jillian from the last painting I done....its rarely cleaned...as I always use the same colours in a painting...well the mixing areas alway contain those colours....maybe lazyness has something to do with it as well LOL..

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Old 12-26-2002, 11:35 PM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by taghera
Heres mine Jillian from the last painting I done....its rarely cleaned...as I always use the same colours in a painting...well the mixing areas alway contain those colours....maybe lazyness has something to do with it as well LOL..

Looks perfectly fine to me! *grin*
Why loose a colour you consider 'perfect'.
I'll forget you even mentions the 'L' word!!!!!
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Jillian
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Old 12-27-2002, 12:46 AM
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Two more art 'rules' that don't seem to bear weight...

I was always told never mix more than 2 watercolours together or you'll get 'mud'.
I think I rarely use less than THREE!

I was also told that colours get darker the further into the distance (horizon) they go. Whoever made up that rule never looked out into the ocean - with depth, most days the ocean is far darker at the horizon, because of depth. Though on still grey days and when the ocean is like a mirror, that 'rule' DOES apply. But most times, it doesn't.
Jillian
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Old 12-27-2002, 01:31 AM
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Cool

I'm not always that tidy Jillian I sqeeze my paint into the small wells of my main palette box. Before each painting I either add a few drops of water using my eye dropper or add fresh paint to each well.

That way no paint is ever wasted.

I also use several other plain palettes for mixing, these do not get cleaned until the painting is finished. That way if I wish to repeat the same colour in another opart of the painting its still available,



Rod.
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Old 12-27-2002, 02:40 AM
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LOL Rod...

Your pallette's way too clean looking..!!
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Old 12-27-2002, 03:29 AM
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I have one large pallette that I started with. I started labeling the color on the outside so that when I came back, I would know which blue was in which well,etc. Now that I have more colors, I have sometimes just thrown color in an empty well, so I do have to clean those out now and then. I usually keep colors in their respectively labelled wells and then use other small pallettes to mix on, doing like Rod and not cleaning them until the painting is done. I often use the lid of my big pallette for a mixing area. When I get done reading this book about transparent colors, I may go back and relabel and rearrange or even change what colors I have and see if it helps with the mud issue. I think it will.
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Old 12-27-2002, 04:37 AM
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I have a John Pike pallette with individual wells around a large open space in the middle and a large, open lid that can also be used for mixing colors.

I have my colors arranged from yellows to ocher to red to blue to green around the palette. Before beginning a painting, I add tube colors to the wells that look a little low, then I put a few drops of water from an eye dropper in each well to wet the paints and "wake them up" again, thus, not wasting any of them.

When I want to mix colors, I use an area in the middle of the pallette. I don't clean my palette while painting a picture, but once it is done, I use a wet paper towel and wipe the center area clean. I like starting off with a white area in the center for each painting.

One of the ladies in my painting group never cleans her palette--it is a rainbow of color splotches. She loves it because she says "I never know when I might need that little bit of color there in the corner or the middle." It would drive me nuts though.

Different strokes for different folks, right?

Sylvia
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Old 12-27-2002, 05:47 AM
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Here's my palette, not clean now because of the painting I'm working on, but usually clean the center with a wet paper towel. As for the wells I just add more paint when they get low and a few drops of water to refresh them before I paint....hate wasting paint.....Also have other smaller palette for my earlier days when just starting out, with different brands of paints....but this palette is W/N artist paint only......and if needed for another colour that i don't have on the palette I use these small plastic plates......I'm coming to find that some of the colours i have on my palette is seldom used so may get rid of them.


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Old 12-27-2002, 05:48 AM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nandie
LOL Rod...

Your pallette's way too clean looking..!!
I agree re Rod's palette, but don't tell him I said so!
*LOL*
Regards,
Jillian
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Old 12-27-2002, 05:50 AM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kari
I have one large pallette that I started with. I started labeling the color on the outside so that when I came back, I would know which blue was in which well,etc. Now that I have more colors, I have sometimes just thrown color in an empty well, so I do have to clean those out now and then. I usually keep colors in their respectively labelled wells and then use other small pallettes to mix on, doing like Rod and not cleaning them until the painting is done. I often use the lid of my big pallette for a mixing area. When I get done reading this book about transparent colors, I may go back and relabel and rearrange or even change what colors I have and see if it helps with the mud issue. I think it will.
I tried labelling and all, but find I just use a colour because I like it. I found, also that when doing a series of paintings I wanted the same colours - as with my rodeo paintings, so I don't clean off between paintings, either.
Thank you for the insight to how you work.
Regards,
Jillian
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Old 12-27-2002, 05:52 AM
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champagneharley champagneharley is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by painterbear
I have a John Pike pallette with individual wells around a large open space in the middle and a large, open lid that can also be used for mixing colors.

I have my colors arranged from yellows to ocher to red to blue to green around the palette. Before beginning a painting, I add tube colors to the wells that look a little low, then I put a few drops of water from an eye dropper in each well to wet the paints and "wake them up" again, thus, not wasting any of them.

When I want to mix colors, I use an area in the middle of the pallette. I don't clean my palette while painting a picture, but once it is done, I use a wet paper towel and wipe the center area clean. I like starting off with a white area in the center for each painting.

One of the ladies in my painting group never cleans her palette--it is a rainbow of color splotches. She loves it because she says "I never know when I might need that little bit of color there in the corner or the middle." It would drive me nuts though.

Different strokes for different folks, right?

Sylvia
Yes, different strokes.
Bravo for you on being so organised.
Regards,
Jillian
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