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Old 05-25-2001, 12:41 AM
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gayelyn gayelyn is offline
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Question To frame or not to frame.

I frame acrylics that are on canvas but I am unsure if it is necessary to frame acrylics painted on masonite.
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Old 05-25-2001, 10:16 AM
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Depends n the style of your work and where it is intended to be hung.

It is becoming popular to glue 1" x 2's" to the back of the masonite board, and paint them black and hang as is. This for some shows, coffeehouses, etc., on the other hand, I've done most of my paintings on masonite...and they are quite expensive and deserve the best presentation, ie. a good frame. Masonite inserts quite easily into the routed lip of a frame.
-Larry

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Old 05-26-2001, 01:13 AM
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It isn't a question of necessity -- you don't have to frame paintings on canvas either. Most paintings just look a whole lot better framed.

Victoria
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Old 05-28-2001, 02:26 PM
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Keith Russell Keith Russell is offline
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Larry:

For your masonite paintings, are they framed behind glass?

I did a few pieces on masonite a couple years ago, but they were incredibly heavy, and glass only added to the problem.

But, airbrush paint layers being so thin, I don't really want to leave the glass off...

Keith.

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Old 05-29-2001, 03:03 AM
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Thanks Larry and Victoria,framing does add that finished look.I am trying to talk my husband into taking a framing course. with no luck I shall just start with some of my favorites.
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Old 05-29-2001, 03:18 PM
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Gayelyn: Since I paint for my own pleasure and not necessarily to sell, I don't want to (and cannot) frame everything I do. But I have done a couple of paintings where I painted a frame onto the canvas. One I did after the picture was done (needed a frame, but I didn't want to buy a real frame because it was (1) big and (2) a copy of a famous artist's work); and this weekend I painted a frame, and then painted the picture to go with it. They actually look pretty real. Trompe l'whatever.

Victoria
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Old 05-30-2001, 02:37 AM
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Thanks Victoria,that's a brilliant idea,and would look great on masonite.You sure learn something new every time on this site.
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Old 05-31-2001, 08:36 PM
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when you sell a framed piece of art do you attach the hanging hardware for the customer.I ask because most frames i've bought don't come with the hanging hardware.
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Old 05-31-2001, 09:19 PM
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Yes, silverpanda, put the hardware on. If you buy a piece of art from a gallery, it comes with hardware. Every frame I've bought -- whether off the rack or custom-made -- came with hardware (not always pre-attached, but it always comes with it at least).
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Old 06-01-2001, 12:38 AM
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Thanks i guess i'll be going back to the frame store this weekend.Oh if you don't mind answering one other question,is it just a matter of preference to frame an acrylic or oil painting under glass.I've seen paintings framed both ways,with or without glass
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Old 06-01-2001, 04:00 PM
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Hi, DavidF. I asked that very question here once, and here is the answer I got from Cuttlefish:

Yes, varnished acrylic paintings on paper can be displayed naked. Unvarnished paper surfaces may attract dust and be difficult to clean, so either make sure you have a contiguous varnish surface or glaze your frame. Just make sure you have a thick enough matte to keep the paint away from the glass.
About glass, though-- I'd reccommend using real glass only for framing dry pastel paintings. Plexiglass (and other plastic glass substitutes) is much lighter and more resistant to breakage than glass. The weight advantage is especially valuable with very large paintings. Unfortunately, most plastics tend to hold a static charge which will attract unfixed pigment, like dry pastel. Acrylic should not be framed in direct contact with plastic or glass as unwanted adhesion and compression may occour, especially when subjected to hot lighting conditions.

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Old 06-01-2001, 10:01 PM
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VictoriaS: Could you explain further why you feel acrylics or oil paintings done on canvas or board should not be placed under glass.I use the various panels made by Ampersand now but have used pre-streched canvas in the past.I only frame my boards under glass to protect them from dust,people smoking,touchy feely fingers etc..Theres a mat between the glass and the painting.Sorry if these are stupid questions i'm still somewhat learning.
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Old 06-02-2001, 01:13 AM
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Silverpanda: In my opinion, everything looks better without glass. If your acrylic or oil paintings are on canvas or board, you should not use glass. If they are on paper, you could go either way. Pastels and watercolors (on paper) should always be framed with glass and a mat to protect the paper, but with acrylics, the acrylics themselves should be sufficient to protect the paper from the environment.

Victoria
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Old 06-02-2001, 01:36 AM
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Victoria,

When framing Acrylic WITHOUT glass, would you expect to varnish your work to give long term protection, or is this not really necessary?

Thanks
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Old 06-04-2001, 02:16 PM
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Silverpanda:

Those aren't stupid questions. I should not have said that you "shouldn't" use glass. It won't hurt anything if you do use it. It is only my opinion that paintings generally look better without glass -- particularly if there is any texture. That's just my personal preference.

I see you're in L.A. The Getty Center has Van Gogh's "Irises" under glass (I think it's the only oil painting they have under glass). I suppose it's to keep people from touching it. But the effect is kind of like a barrier between you and the painting, and to me it looks peculiar.

I've been using the Ampersand boards, too (I like the Claybord Textured for acrylics). They don't need any more protection than a canvas would. I even saw in one gallery, the artist had done watercolors in Claybord Textured, and they were framed without glass (he just used the Claybord Fixative spray, which Ampersand says you don't need for acrylics). Acrylics are pretty durable. Sure, they can get dirty just like anything else; a coat of varnish will give some protection. To me, though, using glass over oils or acrylics is kind of like putting plastic slipcovers on furniture: Why bother having good furniture if you won't let yourself enjoy it?

But, Silverpanda, I am not an expert. I think you should call a few custom framing shops (not Aaron Bros.!) and ask them what they think and why they think it.

Victoria

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