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Old 02-24-2010, 12:05 PM
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framing and mounting question

I'm trying to learn a proper way to mount and frame the paintings. I've seen a lot of good info on this site but have questions anyways.

I got some acid-free archival framer's tape and a 3/16" sheet of foamboard. The problem is, I don't like the fact that the tape touches the painting. I have some colored pencil work too and this tape takes off the fixative if you remove it. I've seen doubletack or some other recommendations that maybe better since that avoids touching the painting, but removing it from the mount board in the future maybe a problem since they are strong permanent adhesives. Doubletack would probably be even more permanent than the framer's tape.

Also, the frame I'm trying to use is a picture frame from a hobby store. The 3/16" foamboard is too thick for it. Are there special frames for paintings vs. photos? I'm thinking to use a matboard if the foamboard idea doesn't work out.

I'd like to know your experiences and your methods for this. Thanks.
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Old 02-24-2010, 12:24 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Hi Prashant!
You shouldn't attach the painitng to the backing bord from the front anyway.
I either use an archival double tack for lighter paintings, use a hinge...
See here in the section "Attaching painting to the undermount":
http://www.alistairbutt.co.uk/framing.html

Also here is another good palce for tips:
http://www.framing4yourself.com/tips/index.htm
Search "hinge"...
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Old 02-24-2010, 02:57 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

I really like these "see thru mounting strips" - scroll down - they are about the 2nd or 3rd item from the bottom.

http://www.framingsupplies.com/Tools...TapesGlues.htm

no adhesive touches the painting at all. You put the painting in the mat and lay it upside down. Then press the adhesive of the clear plastic strip onto the back of the mat right along the edges of the painting . The non-adhesive, rigid plastic portion will overhang your painting and hold it into place. Then you can place your backing board or foam core on the back and set it into your frame.

You can cut the strips to any length - sometimes I put a piece on the center of all four sides, and sometimes I create 4 corners with them. As long as you have some on each side the painting cannot slide out of place.

Last edited by AmyLC : 02-24-2010 at 03:03 PM.
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Old 02-24-2010, 03:23 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

thanks Srishti and Amy. that's really helpful stuff. the mounting strips seem like a nice idea. you can probably even position your painting on the backboard and mount it on there instead of the mat, right?

painting is fun. this stuff is not. but necessary anyways if you don't want to pay a boatload for the professionals to do it for you.

i normally have just stacked my paintings in a corner, but I got an invite to participate in a local art show and so now I'm in need of figuring out how to display the stuff properly.

the sheets of 3/16" foamboard were expensive and now that it doesn't fit in the frame, i don't even know what to do with it.

i'm still interested in finding out what you guys use as backboard/mounting board.
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Old 02-24-2010, 05:03 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Prashant,
I do a lot of my own matting and framing after taking a class at the Base Hobby Shop on how to cut mats and frames.

Normally, with a watercolor painting, you would place it face down on the acid free mat over the opening. When you have it where you want it, put two or three pieces of tape at the top of the painting only to connect it to the mat. The sides and bottoms hang free.

The tape only touches the back of your painting and the mat, not the painted surface. (There is a technique for float mounting a painting also where it sits on top of the mat rather than under it, but that is a different method than what I am describing here.)

When you put the painting into your frame, the glass will be on the bottom, the mat with the painting mounted in it will go next, then the backing board.

A couple of times when using a frame I picked up at a garage sale or somewhere else, I have used a matboard as a backing board because a foam board was too thick. So your idea to do that with the frame you bought is a good one.

Hope this helped. Check out americanframe.com for more information on mats and frames.

Sylvia
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Old 02-24-2010, 10:47 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

thank you Sylvia for the explanation. I think now I've got a good grip on how to handle this issue.

Of course, more suggestions and experiences welcome.
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Old 02-24-2010, 11:24 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Yes..you can put the painting down face up on your backing board and use the plastic tabs that way IF you've left enough of a margin around the edge. The clear plastic part is about 1/2 inch wide...so you need to be sure you have at least that much "extra" paper to be hidden under the mat. (in a pinch I've been known to trim the plastic to be not as wide, though)

I do think that's an easier way to do it because I find it REALLY hard to put my painting face down on the mat and have it lined up properly. I HATE it when I turn it over and find it to be crooked!!!

I know you are not supposed to tape all the way around a painting when framing because you want to allow it to expand/contract/warp in the humidity. These tabs work okay for that because they don't hold the paper completely tight to the mat -there's a tiny bit of wiggle room, and they don't go all the way around all the edges.

As for backing or mounting board... it depends on how deep the frame is. I use acid-free foam core on my metal frames (and they sometimes ALSO need a mat board with it to fill it up). With wooden frames I will usually use some acid free mat board. For shows I prefer a simple black metal frame and white mat - I've been taught this is the most "professional" way to present work. (I know that can be debated of course!! just saying what I've been taught at school)

Last edited by AmyLC : 02-24-2010 at 11:28 PM.
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Old 02-25-2010, 08:19 AM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Quote:
Originally Posted by AmyLC
I do think that's an easier way to do it because I find it REALLY hard to put my painting face down on the mat and have it lined up properly. I HATE it when I turn it over and find it to be crooked!!!

Here's my method (hopefully it will be clear without a picture)

To the artwork, stick a couple strips of masking tape to the back top of the artwork, with a couple inches extending above the artwork (you'll remove these later).

Turn the artwork face up with the tape lying flat above the artwork.
Hover the mat above the artwork without touching the tape until you have it situated the way you want it. Then press down to make contact with the tape.

Turn it over and then mount the artwork to the mat properly, removing the tape after you've secured the artwork.

(I have on occasion, espcially with larger pieces, taped it down more securely on sides and/or bottom with the masking tape just to keep it from wiggling while I mount it properlly).

Hope this helps.

BTW - I usually use drafting tape because it is less tacky than masking tape and there is little risk of it pulling up any of the paper surface when I remove it. If I do use masking tape, I render it less tacky first by pressing it on a piece of cloth (my jeans or shirt) first to pick up a bit of lint.
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Last edited by Surfinia : 02-25-2010 at 08:24 AM.
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Old 02-25-2010, 11:50 AM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Great Advice everyone!
Sorry Prashant , don't want to steal your thread... but I have a few questions
Is it better/worse/"does it matter" if one attaches the painting to the backing board or to the mat?
What's the preferred way to do it?

One big question that bother's me:
Should I be putting a dust cover... glue a piece of paper to the back of the frame so any does doesn't seep in?
I have never done this but I always wonder.
The disadvantage would be that it would be kindof permanent... and I won't be as likely to reuse a frame
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Old 02-25-2010, 01:05 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Quote:
Is it better/worse/"does it matter" if one attaches the painting to the backing board or to the mat?
What's the preferred way to do it?

Srishti,
I've had a class in matting and framing, get help from the professional framers when I go to the Frame Shop and cut my mats, and read several books on it. NONE of them say to attach the painting to the backing board. They ALL say to attach it to the mat at the top only as I mentioned above.

Quote:
To the artwork, stick a couple strips of masking tape to the back top of the artwork, with a couple inches extending above the artwork (you'll remove these later).

Turn the artwork face up with the tape lying flat above the artwork.
Hover the mat above the artwork without touching the tape until you have it situated the way you want it. Then press down to make contact with the tape.

Turn it over and then mount the artwork to the mat properly, removing the tape after you've secured the artwork.

Great advice from Valda about positioning your art inside the mat.

Quote:
Should I be putting a dust cover... glue a piece of paper to the back of the frame so any dust doesn't seep in?
I have never done this but I always wonder.
The disadvantage would be that it would be kindof permanent... and I won't be as likely to reuse a frame

The only time I add a paper dust cover to the back of one of my paintings was when I use a wooden frame. Whenever I use a metal frame, the backing board acts as a dust cover IMHO so I don't use one.

Sylvia
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Old 02-25-2010, 04:01 PM
Regina McMullan Regina McMullan is offline
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Re: framing and mounting question

You may also want to see the WC Studio Tips and Framing channel.
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:40 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Thanks Sylvia a lot regarding your input on the attaching the paint to the mat clarification.
I always use wood frames and so will give the dust cover a thought!
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:41 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Surfina, definitely that's a very good technique which I will absolutely certainly be using it!
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Old 03-01-2010, 04:49 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

Great information learned a lot from reading this thread... Thank you all
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Old 03-01-2010, 05:07 PM
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Re: framing and mounting question

thanks everyone for some great information! really appreciate it.

i figured out a solution. I bought some Blick brand precut museum grade mats. they come in packs of 6 and with an archival grade mounting board. this solves my issue of the foamboards being too thick for the frame. also, i think i'll continue to use the framer's tape but only use it at the top like Sylvia has suggested (and also use it on the back of the painting).

now i'm stuck with 10 big sheets of foamboard that were not cheap.
oh well, trial and error of a newbie. i'll probably find use for it for something in the future.
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