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Old 11-07-2004, 11:51 PM
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Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Basic 101
Class 3
Drawing Cubic Objects

Materials:

For this class you can use the same number two pencil from the first two classes or, if you want, go ahead and incorporate your pencil of choice.


The Cube:

A cube has a top, a bottom, and four sides. /Thousands of objects have the cube at their very core. Cubes will not always be perfectly equilateral. They can be short, long or tall. They can be boxes, they can be found in animals and in churches. Cubes are everywhere. Look at figure 1.

This is a sketch that I completed in about 15 minutes or so—it is a graphite and colored pencil drawing. Notice that its main components are cubes. To create this sketch, I took two photos printed out from my computer—I print out all my images on photo paper as I notice that I get a sharper image. Both images are in color although sometimes I will print out a third gray scale image. However you can take a piece of hard red plastic and lay it over your color photo and the colors will wash away and you can clearly see your values. One of the color photos I place on my table as the reference photo. The other photo is placed on my light table and I backlight the image so that I can see elements of the picture that I would otherwise miss.

Next I just did a sketch starting first with a loose drawing to determine the basic geometric shapes. The shapes are drawn over and over again until I get the shape that I am looking for. In this case the core components are cubes. See if you can find the cubes in this image.

In this sketch there are four cubes clearly represented of varying shapes and sizes. Also because this is only a sketch I don’t need to strictly enforce the laws of perspective. If I want to develop this picture further I simply take a sheet of tracing paper, lay it over the sketch and trace the sketch lines onto the tracing paper—I can then make my perspective corrections onto the tracing paper prior to transfer—I use a heavy vellum to do this.. I then will rub graphite on the opposite side and transfer my corrected drawing to the “Good paper “ and then will proceed in whatever media that I want. You may also do the transfer via graphite paper, light table, or by taping the paper to a glass door or window and using it as a “natural light table”. You can also transfer by grid or by compass (which I do sometimes.)










Keeping these procedures in mind the class assignment is going to be a very short one. The idea is to draw….draw…draw… Below I have provided several examples of images that contain cubes. Some are very simple but repetitive. Choose whichever one of these you would like to draw OR you can choose an image of your own liking. Do the following:

1. Take a look closely at your chosen image and, in your mind, visualize the cubes that are contained in your picture. DO NOT visualize squares—visualize the cube as a three-dimensional object—the picture you are drawing is, after all, a picture of something three-dimensional.

2. Relative to the image, begin to flesh out the cubes on your paper—draw the entire cube or cubes as you see them.

3. Note their relationship to each other. Make sure that your proportions are correct. When you draw the cubes draw lightly restating your lines over and over until you get the image positioned an proportioned as you see fit. Start to flesh out the rest of the picture.

4. Darken those lines that you wish to keep—some lines on the three dimensional cube may not be seen in the picture that you draw so those lines DO NOT have to be darkened.

5. Add the detail to your image loosely again restating the lines until you are satisfied.

6. Once your sketch is complete, transfer the sketch to your vellum (tracing paper)—correct for perspective IF necessary.

7. Using your preferred method, transfer the image to your “good paper”.

8. Detail and fine-tune your image.

The beauty of this method is that you can take several images and create a composite image. You have a scene in a room, for example, that has no people but you have a sketch of a person who might fit in nicely—the solution is to transfer the person to your room drawing (adjusting for scale of course) and paint away.

For now, just concentrate on the cubes. If you have a drawing that you are working on and you do not have a lot of time, use that drawing for your exercise this week. However, this week I would also like you to take your sketchbook with you wherever you go and when you sketch—look for the cubes both man-made and in nature and see how many you can locate. Feel free to share your sketching with the rest of the class so that we may all learn from your experiences. Good luck and happy drawing!

Note from the Editor: This thread continues with the recent posts. The older posts can be found in this closed thread:
http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=228822


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Last edited by arnoud3272 : 12-17-2009 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 11-13-2011, 06:33 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

I see cubes everywhere nowadays, lol. I do that on the way to work every morning now, break things down into cubes. Anyways here are my attempts...



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Old 11-14-2011, 05:11 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Very well done, Gabriela . You clearly have a good eye for cubic forms.
Please move on to class 4 .
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Old 12-09-2011, 04:41 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Hello,

Professional life kept me busy again. So I took my time again to make a few new drawings. I did another piece of furniture and the dice from the first post. However, the dice are not fully complete. As I will try my hand on the shading of the surface this weekend. So it probably isn't a bad idea to post the results in between.

reference of the sofa:





and the dice:


I'm I right when I say that the picture of the dice is made in a 3 point perspective?
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Old 12-09-2011, 05:18 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

sirOwlBeak - Well done , you got the correct forms.
Yes, those dice are in 3PP. According to traditional, academic criteria, this is an error, a camera distortion (camera hold too close). But a nice exercise. Even a better exercise would be to correct that distortion
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Old 12-09-2011, 10:08 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Arnoud,

This is probably not within the scope of this class, but I have a question.

In the previous lesson I was reading some of the earlier posts, and you had posted a link to http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8482170 where you showed regression on a bridge with a series of arches. I am geeky enough that I was intrigued, and when looking for alternates for the cube drawing I found this one of a covered bridge that looks like a fun exercise.

Either I have misunderstood the regression process, or there is something else going on.
I will probably use this for one of my exercises for this class regardless, but if you can point out what I was doing wrong here it would be much appreciated.

Thank you again for your kind efforts in these classes.

Jim
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Old 12-10-2011, 04:30 AM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Jim - Good for you to try things out .
Quote:
if you can point out what I was doing wrong here it would be much appreciated
Nothing wrong in the method, but a slight inaccuracy at the starting position is amplified by the repetition:



Keep up the good work
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Old 12-10-2011, 09:38 AM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

As in life, the devil is in the details.

Thank you for the illustration. I will definitely use this as one of my exercises.
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:08 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

OK, here is part one of my exercises. I tried to correct some of the camera distortion mentioned above. That was trickier than it seemed like it should be, but here is my attempt.
On the paper it looked like there was more of a value difference between the top and rear faces. I guess I need to study the link on improving contrast in scans more, because it didn't work this time (Downloaded GIMP but I am not very familiar with sophisticated image manipulation, but I will get there).

Regards
Jim
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Old 12-11-2011, 10:31 AM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Jim - Very nice, good job .
Quote:
Downloaded GIMP but I am not very familiar with sophisticated image manipulation
There is a very good tutorial on GIMP here. It is not based on the last version, but the differences are obvious.
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Old 12-11-2011, 03:26 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Here is my shot at the dice pic. It was much harder than it looks, and some of the proportions and angles still seem a little off.

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Old 12-11-2011, 05:49 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Wendy - Well done, nice shading .
Quote:
It was much harder than it looks, and some of the proportions and angles still seem a little off.
There is a relatively simple method to get correct angles, perspective
You did mostly very well, only error is dice B to the right.
The proportions are difficult because of the foreshortening. That is something practice and experience will teach you. What you did is changing the orientation of dice B in comparison to the reference (that's OK), but you kept the same foreshortening. But its orientation is now more or less symmetrical, so the foreshortening should be the same left and right.



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Old 12-12-2011, 02:43 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Here is my basic drawing of the clock scene.

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Old 12-12-2011, 04:18 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Here is my sketch of the silo...still need a little work.

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Old 12-12-2011, 06:05 PM
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Re: Basic 101: Class 3 - Drawing Cubic Objects

Wendy - Looks good .
One rather apparent error in perspective on the clock wall: the tiles on the counter logically have the same orientation as the bricks, i.e. all those grout lines belong to the same set of parallel edges. They cannot have different VP's



Otherwise you're doing very well .
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