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Old 07-13-2009, 04:55 PM
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Museum Glass Prices

Hi,

It has been discussed how museum glass can be expensive.
A couple of years ago I got a sample and it does make a difference.
For those who never noticed, usually has a greenish tint although there are other more clear versions like the one I saw today.
It's also important to remind that to take fully advantage of its characteristics, a work framed under this glass should be placed under proper lighting conditions.
Now back to the price issue : I asked the price of a piece with 30cm x 40cm ( 12in by 16in) and was given the price of 15 Euro (about 25 Dollars).
An anti-reflective glass (etched, not optical treated like camera lenses) of this size will cost something like 5 Euro.
If we're talking about a work that sells for 100 Euro may be important in terms of profit, but if the work is sold for 400 Euro, then those extra 13 Euro might be worth.
Mind that before applying a museum glass, you should compare with another one, because it can happen that due to the used colours, namely dark values, on a work, an anti-reflective may be a better option.

Best regards,

José
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Old 07-13-2009, 10:24 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

I use museum glass no matter what I'm selling the painting for. If quality materials are used, then the client sees "quality." My paintings are worth it.
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Old 07-13-2009, 11:32 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

I agree, Paula. It is especially important if there a lot of darks in the painting.

For me, it's not just about recouping the cost when the painting sells. It really makes a difference at shows when work is hung side by side. Galleries will also tell you that it makes a big difference.

My two cents.

Phil
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Old 07-14-2009, 12:02 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Well, those of us who are on limited budgets, this is not an option at this time for me.

I also have to pay to have my paintings framed - I no longer have a spouse to help with that chore and I have no time or patience to do it myself.

I opt for TruVue Conservation

Last edited by Kathryn Wilson : 07-14-2009 at 12:14 PM.
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Old 07-14-2009, 12:14 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Hobby Lobby has museum glass and the prices are very reasonable. A piece of 16"x20" is only $35. I've bought pieces of 8"x10" for $10 there.
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Old 07-14-2009, 12:15 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

No Hobby Lobby here.
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:26 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paula Ford
Hobby Lobby has museum glass and the prices are very reasonable. A piece of 16"x20" is only $35. I've bought pieces of 8"x10" for $10 there.

OK Paula, I've been known to be wrong, but are you absolutely certain the "museum glass" you are getting from Hobby Lobby at these amazing prices is TruGuard Museum Glass (an industry top quality genuine museum glass) or is it museum quality glass? Conservation Perfect Vue is another TruGuard product used on original artwork. It is also expensive; a little more than half the price of Museum Glass. I know places like Hobby Lobby buy in huge quantities, and therefore get a good discount. However, the prices you've quoted seem just a little too good to me. I also know those places don't always employee the most knowledgable people in their framing departments, and could be confusing the term "conservation" with "museum".

I buy 16x20 Museum Glass wholesale in boxes of 3 lites. The price can be as low as $24 per sheet (for 10 boxes) or as high as $28 if I buy only one box. Most frame shops mark-up is at least 4 and usually more times the wholesale price. HL would be paying about half of my wholesale price to be able to sell an 8x10 for only $10. This could be possible, but... See why I'm skeptical?

Peggy
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:42 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

I had won a sheet of Museum Glass and the contributor told me it was worth over a $100, so I had been assuming it was out of my price range. I can't even find a framer here in Raleigh to does carry it.
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:44 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Yes, they even give you the stickers to put on the back of your painting so that people know it is actually museum glass and I think the sticker also tells how to clean it. I just called them and the brand name is TruVue Museum Glass, not the conservation.
http://www.tru-vue.com/

I also buy it at my wholesale frame shop and it is a little bit cheaper than HL.
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:47 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Kat, There are Hobby Lobby stores in Asheboro, Burlington, Charlotte, Fayetteville, Gastonia, Greensboro, Hickory, High Point, Kannapolis, and
Matthews. Are any of those places close to you?
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:49 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

The closest would be Burlington, which is 45 minutes away. You would think they would be here!

But I did find someone else here in Raleigh who carries the glass and I will look into it for everybody - you would think they would be listed on the Tru Vue site, but they are not.

Last edited by Kathryn Wilson : 07-14-2009 at 01:57 PM.
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Old 07-14-2009, 02:41 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Does the museum glass makes so huge a difference that it is really worth the cost? I mean *really* really? I prefer the best of materials, but sometimes the difference isn't big enough to justify the cost. I've never seen museum glass and would have to special-order it, so I'd love to know beforehand. Like, how much does the glass darken the painting?

Anti-reflection glass, the etched José mentions, really makes a difference. And still, I wasn't entirely thrilled, because the etching made it look like the painting was 'within' the glass, more like a laminated coaster or table mat. The typical look of a pastel wasn't there, and I perceived a flattening of space.

Ordinary cheap float glass darkens and blue/greens the painting with a half to a full value step on a 10 degree value scale.

Gimme no-cost invisible glass, and all will be perfect! :-D

Charlie
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Old 07-14-2009, 03:54 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Absolutely Charlie! There is NO reflection! You don't have to constantly position yourself to see the painting...because there is no reflection or glare.

Museum glass doesn't darken a painting at all. It is completely clear.... invisible. Sometimes you don't know the paintings have glass on them.
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Old 07-14-2009, 04:08 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Hi,

Lets see if I get things right, because I'm not an expert upon this - I've posted a few links about this in the past.
The anti-reflective glass (the etched one) should have the etched surface placed agains't the work (please correct me if it's the otherwise) and I've used it and little affects a work (I guess there may be different qualities).
Then one has the anti-reflective that is treated with an optical coating, just like lenses. This one is more expensive than the etched one.
Now, as we know, glass has iron and thus the greenish tint.
Glass manufacturers have come up with less iron versions (sometimes called clear water or something like that) that have much less tinting effect.
But lets concentrate upon the museum glass :
Peggy knows about this more than I do and she may confirm that there are several qualities and that Schott (sp?) is among the best, if not the best.
Once I got a sample of museum glass and it shows a green tint, which can be an inherent characteristic of museum glass and not a defect.
Thus the fact that works must be placed under certain lighting conditions to take full advantage of the glass i.e. making it as less visible as possible.
Yesterday I was at the same framing shop and the lady showed me a new version with less green tint but stilll has a bias, this time toward yellow (one cannot expect it to be invisible).
One thing I assure you : you place the sample that I have between your both hands (forming a frame and covering the edges) and in certain positions it really seems invisible.
But like I said, lighting is important.

Kind regards,

José
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Old 07-14-2009, 04:40 PM
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Re: Museum Glass Prices

Thank you Paula! It really makes a difference when you endorse it!

José, if I'm not mistaken, the etched surface has to be on the outside, because the other side of the glass is flat and reflective. And, the paiting has to be either touching the glass or very near it. Shadow box framing already makes a too large distance between etched glass and painting.

Maybe we should research earlier threads, I think this was discussed about a year ago.

I've been surfing around since I asked (should've surfed first, asked after... :-). I found a glass locally sold by Nielsen-Bainbridge that is claimed to be invisible, a museum glass coated on both sides, *and* with the option of UV protection too. They say people test a framed picture with their finger as they can't see the glass and have to touch to believe.

They mention that the effect of invisibility is best when seen at eye-level and straight on. Now that can mean two things, either that it is generally the optimal condition, with just a little 0,5% reflection when seen from another angle. Or, it could mean visiblity is considerably lowered when seen from a slight angle. I guess I have to ask a framer, and I suppose Nielsen would answer a question even if they only sell to framers and not to private persons.

When in one's development as an artist is it wise to get the very best nearly invisible glass? I'm still a student, but have started to sell and get commissions. (Which reminds me I really need to get working on one...)

Charlie
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Last edited by Colorix : 07-14-2009 at 04:45 PM.
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