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Old 05-30-2009, 12:57 PM
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issshy issshy is offline
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Red face how to use liquin (W & N)

hello...........just got a bottle of Liquin original(windor & newton) but dunno in what proportion i gotta use it .....can i mix it with oil paints as i paint wit a little turp an linseed oil??????????...........or shd i use only liquin with paints????.......somebody pulleeeeezzz tell me..
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Old 05-30-2009, 01:22 PM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

Hi,

This how I do it, when painting in layers.
I add turps and Liquin in the first layer.
Then as I move to the upper layers I reduce the Liquin and turps and start adding a bit of Standoil (it's a polymerized linseed oil).
Now, since Liquin is an alkyd medium that will accelerate the drying process, it's natural to reduce it as one moves to the upper layers, or at least keep the same amount.
As for proportions I really never thought about it, but I'd say that I start probbably with 10% or 15%.

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José
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Old 05-30-2009, 02:13 PM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

hey Jose thanks a lot.....if am painting by flemish method then what u said works but what if its wet on wet...??!!...then how to use liquin?? mix it with turp an a lil linseed as i paint??
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Old 05-30-2009, 03:06 PM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

I use it straight from the jar throughout the painting process, and have never thinned liquin w/turps. I'll thin my initial oil underpainting with straight turps and then when dry, start in with layering and oil paint/liquin. since it dries in 24 hours it's ideal for working with glazes.
I work in layers with a lot of glazing, sometimes up to 20+ layers of paint. I've never had any negative issue w/liquin.



there is also liquin impasto, which I'm starting to play with, it's great stuff!

Last edited by datura : 05-30-2009 at 03:11 PM.
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Old 05-30-2009, 03:10 PM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

one thing I've heard is it's better to work on panels w/alkyds as opposed to canvas because it's not as flexible when dry. I only work on panels so it's never been an issue, but maybe someone else can explain if that's true.
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Old 05-30-2009, 03:15 PM
Nilesh Nilesh is offline
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

Quote:
Originally Posted by datura
one thing I've heard is it's better to work on panels w/alkyds as opposed to canvas because it's not as flexible when dry. I only work on panels so it's never been an issue, but maybe someone else can explain if that's true.
Alkyds are typically more flexible than oils, and do not become brittle with age as oils tend to do. The films are less likely to crack than oils. This is especially noteworthy when using non-rigid supports.
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Old 05-30-2009, 03:18 PM
Nilesh Nilesh is offline
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

Quote:
Originally Posted by issshy
hello...........just got a bottle of Liquin original(windor & newton) but dunno in what proportion i gotta use it .....can i mix it with oil paints as i paint wit a little turp an linseed oil??????????...........or shd i use only liquin with paints????.......somebody pulleeeeezzz tell me..
It is good to keep in mind that alkyd mediums, including those in the Winsor and Newton range, come in a variety of viscosities.

Yes, you can mix them in with the paints.

The W&N website should have some good tips on using their alkyd mediums.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:50 PM
hoakley hoakley is offline
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

Issshy,

When you use Liquin, even the thicker Liquin Original, I do not think that you will feel the need for any thinner or oil - just a little dab of Liquin mixed with some paint and it quickly flows really well. Adding linseed would seem to defeat the purpose, although I could see why you might want to add a solvent to thin, perhaps.

Howard.
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Old 05-31-2009, 10:30 AM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

I agree with Howard.

As far as I know, Liquin ought to be basically treated as any other medium (use it throughout your whole painting and if you need to use more or less, use more on your upper layers, though keep its use to around 20% of your paint, as with any medium).

~!Carey
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Old 06-01-2009, 06:59 AM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

thanks a lot guys.....i was under the wrong impression that i cod mix it wit turp an linseed.....thanks.......
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Old 06-01-2009, 08:16 AM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

Well you *can* mix them...but I would suggest having a reason to do so. If, for instance, you have to have it thinner, or it seems to work better for an imprimatura, then by all means mix it with a bit of solvent and see how it works for toning your canvas or for your first layer. Adding linseed towards the end of your painting might help stretch the drying time. But my point is, know what you want your medium to accomplish, instead of adding things just because you think you should add them or without any clear idea of *why* you are using something. But I do think if you're going to use it, it's not a bad idea to use Liquin throughout your whole painting process, instead of just at one stage. My theory is, the simpler you can keep your medium additions, the better.

~!Carey
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Old 10-30-2010, 11:22 AM
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Question Liquin without oil?

I'm totally new to this forum, but I want to know does anyone use Liquin straight, without any other mediums-not even oil? I paint in oil, (ironically I'm currently painting a series of Daturas (Close up camio shots from a set of photos I took of my own) and am curious if not adding any oil to the paint is not good? Also, I just ordered Neo Meglip, a medium said to add depth etc to the painting. I've never tried it, but when it comes, I imagin I'll use it as I do Liquin. Any thoughts on this?
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Old 10-30-2010, 12:25 PM
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Re: how to use liquin (W & N)

I used to use a mix of liquin and linseed- 50/50- whipped into my titanium at the beginning of each session because I don't like how stiff titanium can be, but, I stopped doing that after a few workshops. I found that my teachers recommended just liquin and just using it in tiny amounts added as they work to allow better handling when they needed it. I also found one teacher who uses Turpenoid Natural as a medium for plein air. I use it as a cleaner when I'm out plein air painting, but I still use liquin as my medium. I find myself using a combination of things depending on what I'm trying to paint. I'll variously use linseed oil, liquin or W & N glazing medium for glazes like water effects.
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Old 10-30-2010, 08:23 PM
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Re: Liquin without oil?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcweber
and am curious if not adding any oil to the paint is not good?

There's already oil in the paint so it's not something you have to worry about. (Please correct me if I'm wrong oh ye more knowledgeable folk) You can paint straight out the tube without adding anything if you like. You only need to add oils or other mediums to get specific effects you desire such as more transparency, thinner viscosity, glazes, thicker viscosity, more gloss, or faster drying (such as Liquin), etc.
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Old 10-30-2010, 09:00 PM
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How to Use Liquin (W&N). . .

Liquin's an alkyd resin medium, W&N's.
Hardly the only brand of alkyd resin medium out
there.
Alkyd resins are the modern replacement for natural
resin; in many regards superior.
Of course, if they couldn't be mixed with oil, you
couldn't paint with 'em at all - After all, it's called oil
paint.
Liquin can dry the paint overnight, thus it's benefits
can be huge, it's lightfast, and discolors less.
The chief benefit of this new resin is it dries almost
instantaneously.
I believe the rule of thumb for oil painting be never
add more 'n 20% of anything into your paint.
After the first session, I place a little Liquin into
my medium just to expedite drying.
What are the drawbacks?
r
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