WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 06:15 AM
Randa07's Avatar
Randa07 Randa07 is offline
New Member
South Australia
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 30
 
Hails from Australia
Painting a "mist" with oils

Hi all, I am new to this forum and was asked by one of my students how would you paint a "mist" in a painting? I've never done this myself but was quiet intriqued by the idea and thought this might be a new challenge for me to try. I was thinking just some blending of the colours and using greys. Does anyone else have any ideas on this topic?
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 06:30 AM
MarkMark's Avatar
MarkMark MarkMark is offline
A Local Legend
Stockholm, Sweden
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,646
 
Hails from Sweden
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

I guess it depends on the mist and the effect.

You could paint the objects in the mist with a muted version of values to those which dont appear in the mist and keep the edges very soft as against those out of the mist which would be clean an crisp.
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 07:18 AM
bsquare bsquare is offline
New Member
the Netherlands
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 20
 
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Yes it depends on what you mean by mist...but you could try glazing with a transparant white, or diluted white
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 08:26 AM
Eduardo Flores's Avatar
Eduardo Flores Eduardo Flores is offline
A Local Legend
Brazil
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,424
 
Hails from Italy
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randa07
... I was thinking just some blending of the colours and using greys....?
Yes, but the way the paint is applied is important: the brush must have a mall charge of rather stiff paint and the areas must be covered only partially. It is the "broken color" technique, when the previous layer still appears under the "mist": small points of it continue uncovered, and the result is a soft, pastel-like appearance.

Eduardo
__________________
My Oil Painting website: http://eduardofloresoilpainter.site90.net/
My Computer Art website: http://dadofl.wix.com/eduardo-flores---computer-art
My blog : http://meta-realism.blogspot.com/
"God gave the artist a window towards other worlds"
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 10:19 AM
WFMartin's Avatar
WFMartin WFMartin is online now
A Local Legend
Glendale, Arizona
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 7,924
 
Hails from United States
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Creating "mist", fog, or dust, is best accomplished by using a simple glazing technique. It is best accomplished on a smooth, brush stroke free painted surface.

I rub medium into (onto) my dried, painted surface, and paint into that applied medium, using full-bodied, undiluted paint. I apply the medium very thinly, as one would apply sunblock to their face. No runs, puddles, drips, shiny spots--only a uniform, "sheen". The medium serves as a lubricant for the paint, rather than a diluent, or a thinner for the paint.

Use a scrubbing action when applying the paint. A filbert brush works really well for this .

Here's a sample of a "misty" effect that I created some time ago on a painting that I did:


"The Shuttered Room"...9" x 12" oil on canvas

If one application of glazed color is not enough to achieve the effect of mist that you desire, simply allow your application to dry to the touch, and apply another in the same manner--medium first, followed by scrubbing on your paint.

You must already have painted a relatively "normal" scene in the area upon which you wish to add your mist, in order for this method to achieve its full potential. In other words, you would find it most difficult to be painting "things" at the same time you're painting "mist". The "things" must have already been painted in place, before applying the mist effect. This is not an alla prima, or pleine aire approach.

Hope that gives you some ideas.

Bill
__________________
wfmartin. My Blog "Creative Realism"...www.williamfmartin.blogspot.com

Last edited by WFMartin : 04-30-2008 at 10:35 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 11:29 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Enthusiast
Singapore
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,643
 
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

I have not tried it. Instead of a brush, would rubbing the 'mist' on with a rag cloth works?
__________________
Merlion
My art website
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 12:44 PM
Mark Sheeky's Avatar
Mark Sheeky Mark Sheeky is offline
Veteran Member
Cheshire, UK
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 798
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

I come from a background in 3D computer graphics and the mist algorithms there are quite simple; make everything more grey as it receeds. So for the best mist you need a scene with distance, some near and some far objects so that the distant ones can be flat grey shadows and the near ones can have more colour and solidity. I'd refrain from "glazing white" or tricks, just paint what you see.

I haven't really done much mist but here is one that just about illustrates what I did



Mark
__________________
My website is: www.marksheeky.co.uk - My YouTube video channel is: Cornutopia
- My Facebook page is www.facebook.com/msheeky
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 02:08 PM
nit-wit's Avatar
nit-wit nit-wit is offline
Veteran Member
Yorkshire
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 751
 
Hails from England
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

A couple of images by the undisputed master of all things atmospheric: Turner.

True I struggled to find something by Turner that personified a pastoral and genteel rolling mist. But I think it's worth noting what Turner does with his lighting of mistiness. Using grey to depict mistiness seems to be an anathema to Turner. Landscape painters are aware of how atmosphere affects objects' appearance. And mistiness is an extreme of this. Silhouettes disintegrate and outlines blend into the background. This is the presence of water droplets. Turner paints this atmospheric phenomena aflame with colour and light.

Andrew



Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 02:54 PM
Mark Sheeky's Avatar
Mark Sheeky Mark Sheeky is offline
Veteran Member
Cheshire, UK
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 798
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by nit-wit
A couple of images by the undisputed master of all things atmospheric: Turner.

Turner tended to paint incoherant blurry blobs much of the time (and was better at drama than realistic depiction of anything). James McNeill Whistler was much better with atmosphere IMO. Not that I want to stir things up

Mark
__________________
My website is: www.marksheeky.co.uk - My YouTube video channel is: Cornutopia
- My Facebook page is www.facebook.com/msheeky
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-30-2008, 04:00 PM
nit-wit's Avatar
nit-wit nit-wit is offline
Veteran Member
Yorkshire
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 751
 
Hails from England
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Sheeky
Turner tended to paint incoherant blurry blobs much of the time (and was better at drama than realistic depiction of anything).

Huh?

A heretic!



You're right though (partly). Turner's figures are a bit bendy to say the least. But what's not realistic about this picture?:



Btw. Whistler was better at being a poncey git than realistic depiction of anything!



Andrew
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2008, 05:50 AM
Randa07's Avatar
Randa07 Randa07 is offline
New Member
South Australia
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 30
 
Hails from Australia
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

WOw! Thanks so much for all the great ideas and techniques. I'll let my student know about the response to my question. I will tell her to get into this forum too it is fantastic!
Reply With Quote
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2008, 07:04 AM
Mark Sheeky's Avatar
Mark Sheeky Mark Sheeky is offline
Veteran Member
Cheshire, UK
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 798
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by nit-wit
Huh?

A heretic!



You're right though (partly). Turner's figures are a bit bendy to say the least. But what's not realistic about this picture?:

Andrew

Eep, I wasn't dissing Turner one of the few good British artists His watercolours in particular were excellent, but for me the mood was much more striking than the accuracy, and I agree with the critics of his day when it comes to the blurry paintings like that steam train in the national gallery and the harbour snow storm. Perhaps he was evolving into Rothko!

Mark
__________________
My website is: www.marksheeky.co.uk - My YouTube video channel is: Cornutopia
- My Facebook page is www.facebook.com/msheeky
Reply With Quote
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2008, 01:49 PM
Mariah1st's Avatar
Mariah1st Mariah1st is offline
Senior Member
Amsterdam (close to)
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 348
 
Hails from Netherlands
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

I'm trying to find the picture of a previous painting. I waited till the paint was quit dry and then applied a very thinned layer of titan white and rubed it with a wrangled kitchen paper, leaving from none till almost complete white shades of fog...
Reply With Quote
  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-02-2008, 09:53 AM
Merlion's Avatar
Merlion Merlion is offline
Enthusiast
Singapore
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,643
 
Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Mariah, I was thinking of rubbing with a rag cloth. Your idea of rubbing with a wad of kitchen tissue paper seems similar.

Do you have a picture you can show us of your effort?
__________________
Merlion
My art website
Reply With Quote
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-24-2013, 05:18 PM
artluck artluck is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4
 
Question Re: Painting a "mist" with oils

Quote:
Originally Posted by WFMartin
Creating "mist", fog, or dust, is best accomplished by using a simple glazing technique. It is best accomplished on a smooth, brush stroke free painted surface.

I rub medium into (onto) my dried, painted surface, and paint into that applied medium, using full-bodied, undiluted paint. I apply the medium very thinly, as one would apply sunblock to their face. No runs, puddles, drips, shiny spots--only a uniform, "sheen". The medium serves as a lubricant for the paint, rather than a diluent, or a thinner for the paint.

Use a scrubbing action when applying the paint. A filbert brush works really well for this .

Here's a sample of a "misty" effect that I created some time ago on a painting that I did:


"The Shuttered Room"...9" x 12" oil on canvas

If one application of glazed color is not enough to achieve the effect of mist that you desire, simply allow your application to dry to the touch, and apply another in the same manner--medium first, followed by scrubbing on your paint.

You must already have painted a relatively "normal" scene in the area upon which you wish to add your mist, in order for this method to achieve its full potential. In other words, you would find it most difficult to be painting "things" at the same time you're painting "mist". The "things" must have already been painted in place, before applying the mist effect. This is not an alla prima, or pleine aire approach.

Hope that gives you some ideas.

Bill

Thanks for sharing! Just what I have been looking for. One question though: what specific medium did you use after the painting dried? Thanks!
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:48 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.