WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Acrylics
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 06:30 PM
Leslie Pz's Avatar
Leslie Pz Leslie Pz is offline
A Local Legend
New Hampshire
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,458
 
Hails from United States
Photographing your work.

How do you photograph your work? I have been fighting with taking good photos of my artwork to show you all and to list paintings on ebay and would love some tips.

Where I used to live we had a barn attached to our house. After we put the girls to sleep we'd snap on the room monitor and head out to the barn where my husband had his office and I had a dinky table set up to paint. There we'd spend many many hours together working and watching tv. The lighting was great and I never had to worry about taking photos of my artwork.

Now things are very different. Taking photos of my art is a struggle (and taking photos of my still life set ups are difficult also but that's another thread). I wait for the "right time of day" and for "just the right lighting" and find the e-photos are still not done well.

I'd love to hear how other people take their photos and maybe any secrets that anyone might want to share. I know I am not the only one with this problem so I am sure any info would be great info.

Thanks!
__________________
¸.•*´¯)¤"˜¨¯" Leslie Anne Pease "¯¨˜"¤(¯`*•.¸

  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 07:04 PM
Jackie339's Avatar
Jackie339 Jackie339 is offline
Veteran Member
MA,USA
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 945
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

Hi Leslie, I'll be watching this closely as I have the very same problem. I live in the n east where it's overcast every day, blah! Sorry I don't have an answer for you. I've even tried setting up my tripod, but the flash overcompensates and you get washed out colors and glare. I too have a problem with photos of still lifes, wanting to get nice shadows aand dark areas, but the bloody flash ruins the effect, and w/o a flash every thing goes gray and grainy. Can anyone help us!? Please!
__________________
Cheers,
Jackie
www.jacklynwilliam.com
http://jacklandarts.blogspot.com/
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 07:08 PM
Leslie Pz's Avatar
Leslie Pz Leslie Pz is offline
A Local Legend
New Hampshire
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,458
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

I live in New Hampshire so I know what you mean by overcast and blah!

BUT!!! I find for photographing my paintings it helps a LITTLE. (Otherwise I find a bit of a glare on my paintings...)

Fun to know there is someone as bummed as I!!!
__________________
¸.•*´¯)¤"˜¨¯" Leslie Anne Pease "¯¨˜"¤(¯`*•.¸

  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 07:12 PM
dreamz's Avatar
dreamz dreamz is offline
A Local Legend
I currently live in Jacksonville Florida
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,807
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

although outdoor lighting is optimal and I prefer setting up with the sun behind me, it's not always practical so I have a bunch of lamps with various watt bulbs.

Indoors or out I generally use a tripod set at the same level as the painting, the painting is either on a display easle that is propped up as vertically as possible or, if inside, on a shelf and propped vertically.

I have a white tablecloth and a dark blue one to act as backdrops (some pictures come out better with a dark background) and I try to fill as much of the view screen as possible with the painting.

When all else fails I take the best of the bad and tweak it in paintshop

If its a quick shot like for a question or wip, I try to get the lighting as close as possible and take the pic from a stable position
__________________
C&C welcome and encouraged
it's only paint...have fun with it
Webshots - Images of dreamz creations
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 08:19 PM
Ian Bruce's Avatar
Ian Bruce Ian Bruce is offline
Lord of the Arts
I live in Bayside on the coast of Maine, USA
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,359
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

I just asked the same question in the Photography Forum and was given this link. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2810/87/. I have trouble photographing my paintings indoors. Outside, in the shade, I have no difficulty. (I find if it is overcast, I don't have to be in the shade). I set the White Balance on my digital camera to a sheet of white paper over the painting (or the back of the painting) and shoot away. Works out well almost always. That link gives some very good suggestions for working inside (my bugbear).
__________________
Ian , the hopeful aspirer.

Any C&C I may make is based on the theory that even the act of disagreeing with one of my lousy suggestions may still spark an inspired idea.

Last edited by Ian Bruce : 01-29-2007 at 08:21 PM.
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 09:00 PM
idylbrush's Avatar
idylbrush idylbrush is online now
WC! Guide
the state of confusion, Florida...
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 21,154
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

I don't know what it is worth but for many years I would photograph work on a bright day with the painting facing south, the image side that is. Between 8 and 11 a.m. if possible. the sun would be almost at a 45° angle to the surface. This would give a slightly warm color and few shadows. It really made a difference.

On three dimensional works it really made for wonderful shadows which was a good thing.

Over the past few years as I have had a bit of money I would buy some parts to create a fair system for photowork.

I got a Canon digital 35mm SLR camera with a 50 mm lens. A sturdy tripod, a shutter release cable. Two light stands and I recently added two quartz halogen photo flood lights. To round it all out I got a polarizing filter for the lens and then two sheet polarizing filters for the photofloods. I set up a 4X4' sheet of homosote which is covered in black cloth and attached that to a wall. I measured the center of the wall and placed a piece of tape on the floor to mark that center point from afar.

Using a level I placed two pins on the homosote wall that were level and even. I can hang a painting on those and be relatively close to level. I use a level to double check that when the painting is in place adjusting as needed.

I put all of this away every time I photograph a work so I have marked spots on the floor where the photofloods go for easier set up. I set them and then focus the light to the far side of the painting while in place. Make sure they crisscross focused to give even lighting.

I attach the polarizing filters making sure the direction of the filters are appropriately aligned.

Most recently I have been photographing in the RAW format using a bracketing setting on the camera.

So far it seems that I have been able to do a fairly decent job of photographing. I have been able to use these images for postcards and handouts with some success.

__________________
Click here to go to the information kiosk My You Tube Channel 48hlc48
The only person you can't fool, is yourself! (Oz The Great and Powerful)
"If you think you can, or think you can't, your right!"
"The thing about art is that life is in no danger of being meaningless," Robert Genn
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 09:04 PM
idylbrush's Avatar
idylbrush idylbrush is online now
WC! Guide
the state of confusion, Florida...
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 21,154
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

Another recent acqusition was a metallic reflector disc for highlighting the metallics. It is a marvel.

I thought this was a marvelous set up if money weren't an issue.

http://bermangraphics.com/artshows/photographart.htm
__________________
Click here to go to the information kiosk My You Tube Channel 48hlc48
The only person you can't fool, is yourself! (Oz The Great and Powerful)
"If you think you can, or think you can't, your right!"
"The thing about art is that life is in no danger of being meaningless," Robert Genn

Last edited by idylbrush : 01-29-2007 at 09:06 PM.
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 09:52 PM
Lady Carol's Avatar
Lady Carol Lady Carol is offline
Moderator
Horses make me happy
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 25,345
 
Hails from Australia
Re: Photographing your work.

I photograph my work at all times of the day and correct for the exposure using RAWShooter Premium. Thus saying I shoot in RAW. I have a digital SLR, Canon REBEL and a Canon 20D and my hubby has REBEL XTI. RAW is a completely different format for shooting in and part of the problem with jpegs is that half the sensor information is lost before you start. RAW collects all the information off the sensor. It is very easy to do white balances and adjust levels. Bracketing can help with RAW and merging of the bracketed images in Photoshop. Some more recent cameras automatically merge the bracketed images in the camera but I do not have one of those.

RAW definitely is the way to go but the cameras that have those capabilities tend to be on the pricier side.
__________________
Carol
"Mercifully free of the ravages of intelligence" - Time Bandits
Moderator: Acrylic Forum
My websites: Discoveries With Colour Adventures in Photography
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 10:11 PM
Leslie Pz's Avatar
Leslie Pz Leslie Pz is offline
A Local Legend
New Hampshire
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,458
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

Thank you Doc and Ian! Such great ideas! Hoping others are reading and also learning! Thanks for the link!!!

Howard- your system is quite elaborate! I'd be proud of what I have and the talent in photographing art! Do you do this as a biz? I know artists would appreciate it!

Carol- You really have quite the electronic background! LOL! I am still translating 1/2 of what you said!
__________________
¸.•*´¯)¤"˜¨¯" Leslie Anne Pease "¯¨˜"¤(¯`*•.¸

  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-29-2007, 10:46 PM
Mark Newton's Avatar
Mark Newton Mark Newton is offline
Enthusiast
Adelaide, Australia
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,019
 
Hails from Australia
Re: Photographing your work.

I shoot my paintings often after hours because that's when I tend to finish working on them, so no sun available. I will use ambient light from the shed lights, or sometomes off camera flash, situated so there is little to no glare off the surface. If I cannot establish the correct colour balance in camera I make adjustments using imaging software and I use jpg rather than the more memory draining RAW or NEF as Nikon calls it. I find altering levels or doing colour corrections in jpg to be no problem, been doing it for years now and originally as a publisher. Basically you really need to learn how to do some image manipulation using the various software available. It's not rocket science, you'd soon pick it up.....but when using a digital camera levels adjustments are very important and virtually always necessary. Good luck..
__________________
Mark Newton
Adelaide, Australia
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-30-2007, 02:26 AM
amaze_1101's Avatar
amaze_1101 amaze_1101 is offline
Lord of the Arts
Christchurch, New Zealand
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 2,645
 
Hails from New Zealand
Re: Photographing your work.

I photograph my work in natural daylight (out of the sun) with it laying flat on the floor and the main light source at the top of the work. There are fewer reflections from this position. I photograph it BEFORE I varnish as well. Fairly simple and it works pretty well as far as colour correctness goes.
__________________
Elaine

My Website
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-30-2007, 03:14 AM
Lulu's Avatar
Lulu Lulu is offline
A WC! Legend
Aotearoa NZ
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 24,207
 
Re: Photographing your work.

I do the same as Elaine, and take lots of photos! in different 'modes' of the camera.
The colour I find difficult to capture accurately though, is red, if it's the only colour of the painting, as some of mine tend to be.
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-30-2007, 03:39 AM
connievanwinssen's Avatar
connievanwinssen connievanwinssen is offline
WC! Guide
Westbroek, The Netherlands
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 27,447
 
Hails from Netherlands
Re: Photographing your work.

I take my photos outside in the shade. Painting against the wall. I standing right opposite the painting a few metres away. If it's too dark I take my photos inside with flashlight. But then I stand at an angle to avoid a glare and correct the format in my photoprogramme.
__________________
Connie
www.connievanwinssen.com

  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-30-2007, 06:57 AM
idylbrush's Avatar
idylbrush idylbrush is online now
WC! Guide
the state of confusion, Florida...
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 21,154
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

"Bracketing can help with RAW and merging of the bracketed images in Photoshop. Some more recent cameras automatically merge the bracketed images in the camera"

HUH!

Never heard of merging images like this, please explain further.

L. This is really a very simple system. Two lights and a camera with a wall.

I don't do this as a business but I do assist other artists to get better images of their work. Good images are important for scholarships, grants, show entries, marketing and other such devices. When I was using a pro photographer it was always miserable. They would take up to three weeks to get the images done. My orders were small potatoes when you have clients like Sunkist and Chris Craft Boats. So I was low on the food chain and just had to wait but the work was so good it was worth the wait until I was missing entry dates waiting then things had to change.

Now I can have good images and slides in short order. Generally in less than 15 minutes I can have a fairly good image and in 48 hours I can have slides and if really pressed in 24 hours. A long wait for me would be about 4 to 5 days. I also have better control over the final image and can manipulate as needed.
__________________
Click here to go to the information kiosk My You Tube Channel 48hlc48
The only person you can't fool, is yourself! (Oz The Great and Powerful)
"If you think you can, or think you can't, your right!"
"The thing about art is that life is in no danger of being meaningless," Robert Genn
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-30-2007, 07:32 AM
dreamz's Avatar
dreamz dreamz is offline
A Local Legend
I currently live in Jacksonville Florida
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5,807
 
Hails from United States
Re: Photographing your work.

Ian, that link has a LOT of good info! Unfortunately it barely mentions using a digital camera
__________________
C&C welcome and encouraged
it's only paint...have fun with it
Webshots - Images of dreamz creations

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:58 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.