WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Art Business Center > General Art Business > Internet Sales Strategies
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 02:56 AM
Eclectic_Asylum Eclectic_Asylum is offline
Senior Member
Colorado Springs
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 153
 
Hails from United States
Being successful on ebay...year long study

I've spent the past year studying Ebay and testing various ideas to see how ebay can work for an artist. Through trial and error I've come to the following conclusions.

First, Ebay is by no means a get rich quick scheme. The opposite is true most artist lose a lot of money and personally treasured works on ebay.

Second, Ebay can be terribly brusing to an artists ego. In some cases it can even cause depression and make an artist put down their brushes.

Finally, there are ways to make ebay work for an artist if one goes into it with the right expectations.

That being said I'll illustrate some of the techniques to make Ebay usefull for an artist, show some of the success stories on ebay, and share some of my own experiences.

MAKING EBAY WORK FOR YOU

There area few rules I've put together on how to make Ebay work for you without suffering too much.

1. Lower your expectations. Don't expect ebay to be your primary source of income. Don't even expect ebay to make you some extra spending cash. High expectations and dreams of money and fame will turn you away from Ebay before you give it a chance to work for you.

2. Auctions are a risky business. Putting your artwork in auction is a risky venture. There are too many pieces that sell for far too little. Auction fees can pile up quickly and you can lose artwork because it sold for only a couple dollars.

3. Ebay is most usefull as a marketing tool. Ebay spends millions of dollars a year to attract buyers and sellers to its website. Millions of people visit ebay everyday so there is an audience that you can tap into.

I know it sounds depressing and it should. Stay away from ebay unless you are willing to take tackle these 3 obstacles.

EBAY AS A MARKETING TOOL

As I said you probably won't make money on ebay, but you can use ebay to attract a larger audience to you and your art.

You may be considering creating your own webpage for you art, or maybe you have a website. You might pay for your website or maybe you have a free one. In any case a website is only as good as the audience it attracts. As an artist you want visitors who are interested in art. Better yet you REALLY want visitors who are interested in buying art. Many free artist websites attract other artist. This is wonderful but artists aren't really customers. If you buy a website that is wonderful but then it is also your responsibily to attract visitors. You can hand out business cards, brochures, etc to attract people to your website but you are limited to face to face encounters. This is great marketing but it doesn't maximize your website. You are left to the mercy of the search engines to attract other visitors.

Most everyone has typed there name into a search engine to see what happens. So you type in your name and yes there's your webpage the search engine is working for me and my website. But is it really? Think about it if someone types in your name are you really reaching a new audience. Of course not.. they know your name. That means they have a prior experience with you either face to face encounter or a word of mouth experience through one of your customers. Go to that same search engine and type in what you do. Example "original landscape plein air paintings", or "commisioned paintings". Ooops where did I go? Truth is it costs a lot of money to make a search engine work for you.

This is were Ebay comes in...they spend millions of dollars a year contracting with the search engines to make sure people find what's on ebay. Ever wondered how a listing on ebay that's only around for 7 days shows up on a search when no matter how hard you try your website is lost and buried? Yep its all about money.

Ebay is all about money too. To use ebay as a marketing tool you have to be prepared to spend roughly $300 a year to open your own ebay store. For that money you get ebays power in the search engines.

WHAT GOOD IS A $300 EBAY STORE?

If you are considering buying your own website it is more bang for your buck. An ebay store can serve as your information center, your contact portal, your online gallery.... And best of all it can handle sales.

If you already have a website the extra $300 is far less that you would have to pay to submit your website to search engines and you will get better search results with ebay. The Ebay store will expand the fingers of your marketing campaign to reach a bigger audience. Your ebay store and your website will work together reinforcing one another building your presence on the internet. The ebay store will also serve as an ecommerce solution without having to pay more money to add one to your website.

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF AN EBAY STORE

Put all your art into the ebay store. It's your online gallery. Good pieces, bad pieces, and ones you never want to part with. It's only pennies to list in an ebay store unlike regular auctions. Here's a few rules for listing in your ebay store.

1. Use only the feature of BUY IT NOW or BEST OFFER. Think to yourself what you would be willing to sell a piece or part with it for....then double it. Make that the buy it now price. People shop ebay for the auction experience and deals. By entertaining best offers you still give the customer this experience. With your price doubled you can accept a best offer and you might even be supprised if someone buys it at full price. This gives you flexibilty and the potential to sell something for more than you value it.

2. Don't price yourself out of the ebay customers range. Unless you are doing it intentionally. There is about a $500 cap on what your average ebay person will spend. Don't expect anything much higher unless it is coming from a contact you have made face to face, and existing client, or someone who has found you through your other promotional efforts.

3. Include as much information as you can in your listing. You never know what keywords people are searching. A bio of yourself, description of the piece, and a little story about it will increase your chances of being found. Again you joined ebay for its marketing power. Search engines love verbage.

4. Study other ebay listings. You need to gain the buyers confidence because you will be reaching an audience that does not know you through a very informal medium.

Follow these guidelines and ebay will help you market yourself. You might sell something and you won't risk the auctions.

WHAT ABOUT AUCTIONS

Auctions are dangerous. Do you really want something you spent days creating selling for a couple dollars? By entering an auction you have officially and intentionally put yourself at risk. However auctions can be very usefull in attracting even more people to you and your store. Here are some helpfull guidelines.

1. The auction is additional marketing. As such it should be showcasing work you ave available not just what is in the auction. You may have seen in other peoples listings a scroller that shows other items they have available. One such tool is available at vendio.com. Use this or something similar if you put something in auction as a way to attract peopl to what else you have to auction.

2. Protect yourself when putting something into auction. Never do a $1 starting bid without a reserve unless you are willing to part with it at that price. Believe me it will happen! Figure your cost of materials and the listing cost. Make this your starting bid if you want to go no reserve. Better yet set a reserve and make the starting bid low...this will attract the most attention and you won't riak your artwork.

3. The reserve is a wonderful thing. Lets say 3 people are interested in your art. But they all value it differently. Person a wants a bargain $20, person B thinks $75, and person C is willing to pay $200. If you have no reserve person C will win your art for $76 even though they were willing to pay more. If you had a reserve price of $199 it would have sold for $199. Having a reserve cost a couple of dollars extra but if your item sells you get that back.

4. Pay attention to listing fees because those determine how much a reserve price will cost you. $49 an $199 are the highest reserves in their fee structure. $1 more and you will pay additional listing fees.

5. Use 10 day auctions. It cost $0.40 more but it means more people will see your listing. It's all about timing with the right buyer so you want to give yourself the best chance. Plus the auction is advertising your store.

6. If it doesn't sell or your reserve isn't met don't worry. Relist the item back into your store. Timing is everything. Maybe a watcher didn't get their last bid in on time. Maybe someone bid less than what they thought it was worth. Maybe someone bid a high enough ammount for you to part with the piece but your reserve wasn't met. You can always contact the bidder and tell them if they make a best offer in your store for $x dollars you will accept it.

WHAT ABOUT FEATURE PLUS AUCTIONS?

So you've noticed there are so many listings in the art auctions and you seem to get lost. It isn't fair that those feature plus listings come up at the front. Well those people paid an extra $20. That means they are risking more. If your item doesn't sell you just lost $20. If your item does sell it still cost you $20 more. Unless you can risk the money or have already established yourself use feature plus in your auctions at your own risk. NEVER I repeat NEVER use FP in your store listings it is a complete waste of money.

So now its time to show some success stories on Ebay. Coming soon.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 04:37 AM
Eclectic_Asylum Eclectic_Asylum is offline
Senior Member
Colorado Springs
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 153
 
Hails from United States
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Ok time for the next installment...

SUCCESS STORIES ON EBAY

In the last post I laid out ways to use Ebay as a alternative marketing solutions. Now for examples of how to make income directly on Ebay. There are three types of people making money with art on ebay.

1. People who run their studio like a business.

2. Established artist who use ebay as an alternative venue

3. Hobby artist.

Very few people make all their income selling are on ebay but there are those who make enough money to notice it.

HOBBY ARTIST

I don't know how to really classify this person other than they fact they they can't stop doodling. The type of person who will fill up sketchbooks that they just pile away for no other reason than that love doing it. On ebay they have found a venue to make a little extra money from what they do for the joy of it.

A uniquely ebay phenomenon is the ATC/ACEO otherwise called the artist trading card has sprung up into a slightly profitable collectors item. Basically its a small work of art the size of a baseball card. They vary in detail from doodles to fully detailed paintings. Anything goes. Some sell upwards of $50, but they average around $5.

I must admit in my research I haven't followed this category very closely. Some of the piece are for to complicated and time consuming to be worth it selling for a few dollars. But, for those that I call constant doodlers this is successful for them. By catering what they do to the art card size they are able to make some extra money by doing what would normally end up pilled in a stack of sketchbooks.

If anyone has some specific example of sellers on ebay doing this with success please post here.


ESTABLISHED ARTIST

There are a few artists, that have established themselves in smaller galleries or operate their own successful gallery, that have made the crossover to ebay. These are the only artists that sell works that seem to break the $500 ebay cap.

Because they auction items irregularly I'm lead to believe they use ebay as a way to sell experimental pieces or pieces that aren't selling in the gallery. I've also noticed instances of these artist using ebay in combination with their galleries to hype certain works and increase its value. In these circumstances the piece is on display at a gallery with the stipulation that it will be auctioned on ebay at a certain date. The patrons of the gallery and the ebay collectors bid against each other online.

Considering the price their work gets they are making money through ebay but the irregularity of listing means it is only a portion of their income $10,000-$20,000 a year. The irregularity also means they are using external and traditional forms of marketing to drive their know clients to ebay.

BUSINESS STUDIOS

There are a few artist on ebay making their entire income on ebay $30,000 - $100,000+ a year. They have a few things in common they sell multiple pieces a week, the average price is between $200-$300, and they exclusively use Featured Plus listings. In general the pieces are large multi canvas decorative abstracts. Most of them have been selling on ebay for a couple of years.

In other threads I've read people wondering how they can make money selling such large works for so little. The answer is quite simple they deal in volume and they run their studio like a business.

1. Most have developed techniques that allow them to produce works that sell in a few hours time. This is obvious by the fact that they can list 10 or more large pieces every week.

2. They treat making art like a job. I have found comments on their websites and through forums that they spend 8+ hours a day painting.

3. The volume of work they do allows them greater purchasing power. A canvas one might find for $40 in an art store they can purchase wholesale for under $10. Actually anyone can but you have to be willing to spend $1000 or more buying canvas by the palette and truck. The mostly work in acrylics so they can save a lot money on paint too instead of buying a tube they buy a gallon. Their material costs are around 80% less than what you would pay at an art store. In fact because they use specific materials in very large quantities they can buy the material for less than what most art stores do except the biggest chains. The purchasing power also applies to their packaging and shipping costs.

With reduced material costs and volume of work the math is quite simple. 10 larges pieces a week 9 sell and one doesn't. Ebay Feature Plus Listing with $200 reserve is roughly $30 each. So the listing cost is $300. Three large canvases per piece at less that $10 is roughly $30 a piece. Total $300 for canvas. Estimating a high value of $5 in paint for each work is another $50. The total listing and material cost is $650. If 9 sell i na week for $200 that's a gross of $1800. Ebay and paypal will take roughly 8% of that leaving $1656. Subtract the material and listing cost and that leaves a profit just a little over $1000 a week which translates into $50,000+ a year income.

I've tried replicating some of the techniques used from the organic styles to the palette knife styles. Most of them take about 1 hour of labor spread between 2-3 hours of drying time. Assuming these artists have enough space they can work on multiple pieces at the same time being productive during the drying times. Its very reasonable to assume that in 6 hours they can complete 2-3 large works leaving enough time to handle ebay and packaging. Considering the work like a business I wouldn't be surprised if they use machines like heaters, dehydrators, and overs to decrease drying time too.
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 05:33 AM
timelady's Avatar
timelady timelady is offline
A WC! Legend
She who rambles
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 11,696
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Some good tips there. My only comments would be that 1. If you want to be a working artist you can't worry about your ego. It's going to get hurt a lot more places than eBay and in a lot more direct ways. 2. Anyone who wants to earn part of their living with art needs to treat it like a business. Because that's what it is.

I agree with the shop and auctions ideas. I have a shop and list one daily auction simply to draw attention to the shop because shop listings don't fare well in searches. It seems to be working - I sell as many shop items as auctions items, and the prices on those are higher. 'Dangerous' is a pretty strong term though - auctions are risky, yes. But so is running an art business. I consider my auction items to be loss-leaders, promotional items essentially. Artists (and any business) have all kinds of potential loss leaders, things you sell or give away for under their value in order to promote business and eventually generate more income. Some artists give to charity for the exposure, some show work in offices or businesses for no fee, some do competition freebies in their newsletters.

I'm also all for an eBay fee budget to keep those costs under control. That's over in another thread.

Oh, and finally - a website doesn't have to cost $300. So that's a false comparison. Read many of the threads here in this forum for lots of advice on how to create a website for very little.

Tina.
__________________
Abstract coast and geology art: www.tina-m.com | Art/Science gallery: www.grejczikgallery.com
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 05:39 AM
Eclectic_Asylum Eclectic_Asylum is offline
Senior Member
Colorado Springs
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 153
 
Hails from United States
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Ok now for some of my experiences with ebay.

First off a little background. I never have considered myself a working artist. I'm mostly self taught with a background in portraiture and pastels. As a career I've done a variety of things surrounding marketing, advertising, and promotions. Ran a small business a few years back developing internet applications for the music and film industry.

In the fall I give into people that ask me for art throughout the year and do some gift portraits for friends for the holidays. In the fall of 2005 I decided to give ebay a try and see if I could use it to pay for all my Christmas shopping. I set up a store with a few options of little portrait sketches. There is a category under specialty services called artistic services. In my opinion it is the most underutilized category in all of ebay by artists. Basically the category is for commissions. This category was my introduction to ebay. I put a custom portrait up for auction. To my surprise I started getting inquires for all sorts of random things that people wanted commissioned for Christmas gifts. That one listing turned into purchases at my store and other commissions. I didn't have much free time and I was getting more inquiries than I new I could complete in time for Christmas gifts so I had to say in my store listings I was taking no more orders. In all it was nice I made enough money to do all my holiday shopping and have some left over to take a little vacation.

At this point I forgot all about ebay until a couple months later when I started getting email inquires for commissions again. My business curiosity set in and went to look at some of the tracking details from my store. Ebay stores include a tracking software that tell you technical things like visits, keywords, searches, where people come from. Since I had a background in this sort of thing I started looking through the data and realized people were coming to my store from google from the most random searches. This is when I decided to study the usefulness of ebay as a art marketing tool. For the first time in my life I began to ponder art as a career.

I started researching the real ebay art categories quickly realizing that pastel work wasn't the way to go for ebay. I decided to learn to paint and put a few things in auctions. Nothing really special just was trying to replicate techniques that I saw selling. I made the mistakes of using the featured plus listing and my first few things sold for under $50. I noticed I was getting emails from the buyers saying they got a bargain and would have paid much more. That's when I realized the importance of the reserve.

I tried using the reserve option and I noticed that it became hit and miss. Being stubborn I was still using the feature plus listing and doing it in two categories. That's expensive. I realized that the ebay fees were piling up and I wasn't coming out very far ahead. More research was needed before I experimented with ebay anymore..

By accident some of the unsold items found their way into by store. I wasn't doing much with ebay except for answering the few inquiries I received for portrait commissions when I suddenly started getting offers from unsold paintings in my store. All I was doing was researching and offers would come in. Most of them were absurd and others were good enough that I sold the pieces.

This past holiday season I decided to experiment some more. Put some quick paintings up for auction to test out ideas. Redid my store listings for portraits and waited to see what happend. The quick paintings did ok still hit and miss but in all I profited about $1000 after eating all the featured plus fees of those that didn't sell. I spent about 50 hours over the span of a couple weeks making those paintings so $20 and hour isn't too bad.

The really big surprise has been the inquires for commissioned portraits. I expected a few holiday gifts large and small but I was getting inquiries for things well into the future not holiday related. All more serious inquiries $500-$1000 plus. Now January has rolled around and I'm still getting large inquires. After a little over a year on ebay my feedback rating must be enough to have gained a certain amount of trust. Most of the larger inquires I end up handling outside of ebay.

So after a little over a year I decided to share what I've learned here. There are pitfalls and there are risks. The guidelines and rules I've put together should help other artist learn from what I have. Ebay can be used as another tool on the path to an art career. I myself for the first time have begun to look at art as a way to make a living. My first year of ebay experimenting and making mistakes I made around $7000 profit directly and indirectly. Now that I've implemented what I've learned in the past months I've accepted commissions that can afford me to live a few month with no worries and devote myself entirely to playing with art.

Jason
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 05:57 AM
Eclectic_Asylum Eclectic_Asylum is offline
Senior Member
Colorado Springs
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 153
 
Hails from United States
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Quote:
Originally Posted by timelady

Oh, and finally - a website doesn't have to cost $300. So that's a false comparison. Read many of the threads here in this forum for lots of advice on how to create a website for very little.

Tina.

That's absolutely right. I didn't intended for it to be a direct comparison. $300 a year is actually expensive if you can design your own website. There are many tool and free websites out there. Most people never need more than a $5 a month server for the bandwidth and storage space they will use. An ebay store is a more expensive alternative for someone who doesn't have a website if they are considering getting one. Considering ebay is an ecommerce capability a direct price comparison is valid considering adding e-commerce to a private website will cost about the same.

The main point is that too many people think having a website in itself is an end. In fact a website is completely worthless with out a marketing plan or extra expenditures to search engines to get people to the website. I've been in the internet industry for 10 years and this is a very common misconception. Out of all venues ebay has the best tie ins to search engines.

Jason
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 06:39 AM
timelady's Avatar
timelady timelady is offline
A WC! Legend
She who rambles
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 11,696
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

True! An eBay store is cheaper than auctions, but not necessarily a cheap option. I opted for it mainly because I like to list more expensive pieces at gallery prices (though there are few on there at the moment) and for that it definitely worked out more economical.

And true, it's all about marketing. I've actually mentioned eBay as one way of marketing in addition to a website over on a marketing thread in General Business. Though I'm doing fairly well on eBay at the moment with low-end stuff (so it's that utility bill money each month, not big shakes) I've always considered it mainly just advertising. More people visit my website from seeing stuff on eBay, people 'step up' to larger work after trying eBay items, and I even have one local repeat collector who buys tons of my stuff on eBay but I've never met her! I've hand delivered to her house even. I have had the odd few collectors who suddenly appear and make an offer on a gallery-priced listing too. So you never know.

Thanks for mentioning your experience with pastels too. I have a collection of pastel sketches to list and might just put them under drawings. (I do fairly well in drawings.) And I think you're right about paintings, painting mediums generally do better and go for more. Thanks so much for taking the time to share so much info!

Tina.
__________________
Abstract coast and geology art: www.tina-m.com | Art/Science gallery: www.grejczikgallery.com
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 08:25 AM
gerbera's Avatar
gerbera gerbera is offline
Veteran Member
Germany
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 703
 
Hails from Germany
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Hi Jason, I just have started to read this thread, but I think, that you share your study here on wetcanvas deserves a great Thank you. I am sure there is a lot of great informations in this thread.
Doris
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 10:25 AM
Picassosattic Picassosattic is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,248
 
Hails from Vatican City State
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

I have also found Overstock.com a great and reasonably priced advertising tool. At Overstock you are free to put a link to your website in your auctions. You just can't link to a page on your site with a shopping cart. I make a fair number of sales directly from my website as a result of this marketing. As a matter of fact my website is rather depleted at the moment.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 11:21 AM
hillrune's Avatar
hillrune hillrune is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Acadiana
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,606
 
Hails from United States
Thumbs up Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Thank you for this thread! It came at an excellent time since I am evaluating my own eBay experience.

Question..as for search engines, have you tinkered with your store keywords or used the eBay defaults?

The reason I am asking - I understand that if you have too many keyword repeats then the search engines pass you by...is that true?

The eBay defaults replicate titles mostly and they are the same since I mostly deal with the same type art for sale.

Question...do you think a store can get too big? and when you say list everything you have, do you mean that? will a buyer pay big bucks for something when he sees you have art selling for less?

Question...about the eBay category where you advertise your commission work, could you give a link?
__________________

eBay
Etsy

Last edited by hillrune : 01-24-2007 at 11:42 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 11:29 AM
timelady's Avatar
timelady timelady is offline
A WC! Legend
She who rambles
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 11,696
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Quote:
Originally Posted by hillrune
The reason I am asking - I understand that if you have too many keyword repeats then the search engines pass you by...is that true?
This definitely used to be to some extent at least - I know my SEO analysis software used to say if you used too few or too many. There were a couple sites in particular (Alta vista springs to mind?) that would stop reading after so many characters (not words). I'm sure someone here will have more up to date info.

Quote:
Question...do you think a store can get too big? and when you say list everything you have, do you mean that? will a buyer pay big bucks for something when he sees you have art selling for less?
I do wonder about the size too, but try to have categories to break it down somewhat. As for prices - I try to make sure my larger work is quite different from the smaller stuff. I know there are fewer buyers for the very expensive work and list the quantities that reflect that. I wouldn't have similar sized work at different prices with the rare exception of a real 'on sale' piece that I list occassionally.

Ruth - that's interesting about Overstock. I thought it went a bit weird for a while? But it's a US thing so I only know what I read on here quite a while ago.

Tina.
__________________
Abstract coast and geology art: www.tina-m.com | Art/Science gallery: www.grejczikgallery.com
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 11:44 AM
hillrune's Avatar
hillrune hillrune is offline
A WetCanvas! Patron Saint
Acadiana
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,606
 
Hails from United States
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

You know, Tina, for awhile I tried dividing things up subject-wise and price-wise. It didn't work. I need the bigger store to pull in buyers! and I need variety!
__________________

eBay
Etsy
Reply With Quote
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 01:22 PM
jkt's Avatar
jkt jkt is offline
Member
Steamboat Springs, CO
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 82
 
Hails from United States
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Thanks Jason for your excellent information and taking the time to do this. As a newcomer... I am excited to put some of your research into action. I had thought that ebay would be good as a marketing tool and your insights confirmed that and I think if one approaches it that way... it is realistic.

JoAnne
Reply With Quote
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 03:44 PM
Heza Heza is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 25
 
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

I thought I'd post this here instead of starting an entirely new thread.

Would selling 'sets' all at once (in multiple auctions) be wiser then breaking them up, say in half (in multiple auctions)?.

For instance, I plan on taking a shot at selling my ACEOs in the future. My newest ACEOs feature the same subject throughout different points of the year (12). I doubt I'll ever reproduce them as far as making prints. Figuratively, with prints, I'd sell them all together in one auction. But these are all originals, and 12 seperate auctions strikes me as generating more potential visitors then just one that easily be overlooked.

When I do eventually sell (not just ACEOs but my art in general), I'd like to have something up every week.

Should I split the 12-themed ACEOs into 6 auctions per week, or list 12 auctions at once?. If I did 6 each week, I'd put an image showing "next week's" batch of ACEOs on the listings and a reminder when they'd be listed.
Reply With Quote
  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 05:38 PM
timelady's Avatar
timelady timelady is offline
A WC! Legend
She who rambles
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 11,696
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

I have found that an auction a day is most effective at the moment (though I do skip Fridays), but it's a new experiment from advice garnered on the eBay discussion boards. I would split them - as you say you can get more attention, and possibly higher bids. You might find several collectors interested and the more interest the more like individual prices will go higher than just one set as a whole. I wouldn't show 'next week's' - don't give them an excuse to wait. Let them bid and buy and if they like next week's they'll be keen to buy another one! I think for a very specific theme like yours I'd probably do them in one week, listing 2 a day. Take that with a grain of salt, I'm not the best eBayer.

Tina.
__________________
Abstract coast and geology art: www.tina-m.com | Art/Science gallery: www.grejczikgallery.com
Reply With Quote
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 01-24-2007, 06:10 PM
RobinZ's Avatar
RobinZ RobinZ is offline
A WC! Legend
Almost Philadelphia
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 16,631
 
Hails from United States
Re: Being successful on ebay...year long study

Me neither, but I am glad I do ebay. I have gotten commissions from my aceo customers. And I've sold some larger (for me) pieces. I have sold aceos for more than $60, averaging in the mid teens. I'm happy with that, but yeah, the "side effect" of being advertising is super! I am interested in your figure of aceos averaging $5. How did you arrive at that figure?

I don't ever frontpage or anything...
__________________
Robin
My portrait paintings
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:44 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.