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Old 10-06-2005, 06:16 PM
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MaureenKennedy MaureenKennedy is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

Sculptural Roses on Mandrel
By Maureen Kennedy


To start, I have made the handmixed canes I want for the rose petals and sepals. The tools I use are a graphite rod of 1/4" diameter, a small Stump marver, a plier masher, a NON-serrated tweezer and a caliper. You can only do these roses with an oxygen propane set up, because you need a pinpoint flame that is not available on a Hothead. If you use a Hothead, then your leaves would be really thick or melted together by the time you finished the flower, because of the bushiness of the flame.



I melt a small amount of glass at the end of the hand mixed rod and smash it with the plier masher. (The larger the rod, the larger the petal) Only the plier masher gets the glass thin enough so that you can work it some time in the flame without distorting the shape.



I make up as many of the petals and sepals I think I will need, and then make even more in case of shock breaking when introducing them in the flame. The coffee cup warmer, (available usually in local drugstores for about $10) is quite hot enough to keep the glass very warm - too warm to touch. (You can also use a hot plate with like a pie tin on top of it, to keep the glass warm. ) You can melt and smash your petals, pull with tweezers off the rod by burning flame there at it's connection, and immediately put them down on this "hot plate" without fear of breaking or scorching the warmer top. Note, I pull the sepals longer and pull off with a flourish to make the more pointed ends.




Now that the petals and sepals are keeping nice and warm on the warmer, I then make a very small tube bead. I put green on the end so that the leaves will integrate nicely in color when they are applied. I use the 30 degree angle on the stump marver to narrow the top of the rose cone, smaller than the rest of the tube bead.



I apply the first petal using the tweezer at the top of the petal. I pick up the fat rounded edge of the petal and bring it up high in the flame, waving it back and forth to warm it up to prevent breakage. I guestimate where the petal will hit the top of the rose cone, and direct my pinpoint flame at the bottom of the petal and press it into the cone. Continuing to direct the heat at the bottom of the petal, I let go of the tweezer on top, and use the side of the tweezer to press the bottom of the petal even more into the cone.



I then use the graphite rod and heating the bottom of the petal, smooth out the petal to the cone, and gently come up the side of the petal to adhere it closer to the cone top, creating a gentle curve at the top sides of the petal.



The top of the petal is then gently shaped with the non-serrated tweezers in any fashion you like. The general heat generated by the pinpoint flame, is sufficient to keep the entire flower warm and prevent shock breakage



You keep adding flower petals around the cone and previous petals, doing the same as above. If in doing this the petals edges become too thick, then use the non serrated tweezers as a press, and mash the petal edges in between the tweezer handles to thin them out, then flame that petal edge to remove the impression.



The sepals are the last to be added, with their fat side heated and attached to bottom of the cone and marvered up the petals with the graphite rod.



I continue adding the sepals, overlapping them, in order to completely cover the base.



The end result




CC Maureen Kennedy 2005 -Not to be published nor maintained electronically on any other person's website I give permission for this tutorial to be on Wetcanvas website for instructional purposes only. I do not give permission for anyone to copy this tutorial and publish in any written or electronic form any where else.

Last edited by MaureenKennedy : 10-06-2005 at 06:18 PM.
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Old 03-17-2008, 01:31 AM
Deliciousy Deliciousy is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

OH My god!! What beautiful!!!
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Old 07-31-2008, 06:34 AM
lindyloonz lindyloonz is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

thank you very much for this, they are beautiful. I have been looking for over a year to find out how these are made. Thank you for being so generous with youre knowledge. Kia Ora from New Zealand. (Newbee)
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Old 09-02-2008, 08:28 PM
GreenWave Solutions GreenWave Solutions is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

That is really cool!
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Old 11-14-2008, 12:45 PM
emailaddress emailaddress is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

really cool
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Old 11-15-2008, 06:24 AM
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Re: Lampwork roses

A wonderful tut.

Thanks Maureen.

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Old 11-30-2008, 04:00 PM
GreenWave Solutions GreenWave Solutions is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

I tried to do this and nearly burned my condo building to the ground. I'm gonna stick with pencils and brushes.

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Old 10-14-2009, 09:28 PM
JoleneT JoleneT is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

To Greenwave...too funny!
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Old 10-17-2009, 07:30 PM
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crowkar crowkar is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

Maureen...thanks so much for the tut...you make it look so easy!!!! But I'm going to give it a try...gorgeous creations girl!!!
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Old 10-18-2009, 12:22 AM
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PaulaMarie PaulaMarie is offline
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Re: Lampwork roses

Maureene they are just awesome. I am a newbie to lampwork I can't wait till I can achieve something this beautiful. Thank you for the tut. I am still using a Hot Head but I am going to practice pulling petals till I can move up to the big kids torch LOL. Thank you again PaulaMarie
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:17 AM
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Re: Lampwork roses

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaureenKennedy
Sculptural Roses on Mandrel
By Maureen Kennedy

To start, I have made the handmixed canes I want for the rose petals and sepals. The tools I use are a graphite rod of 1/4" diameter, a small Stump marver, a plier masher, a NON-serrated tweezer and a caliper. You can only do these roses with an oxygen propane set up, because you need a pinpoint flame that is not available on a Hothead. If you use a Hothead, then your leaves would be really thick or melted together by the time you finished the flower, because of the bushiness of the flame.



I melt a small amount of glass at the end of the hand mixed rod and smash it with the plier masher. (The larger the rod, the larger the petal) Only the plier masher gets the glass thin enough so that you can work it some time in the flame without distorting the shape.



I make up as many of the petals and sepals I think I will need, and then make even more in case of shock breaking when introducing them in the flame. The coffee cup warmer, (available usually in local drugstores for about $10) is quite hot enough to keep the glass very warm - too warm to touch. (You can also use a hot plate with like a pie tin on top of it, to keep the glass warm. ) You can melt and smash your petals, pull with tweezers off the rod by burning flame there at it's connection, and immediately put them down on this "hot plate" without fear of breaking or scorching the warmer top. Note, I pull the sepals longer and pull off with a flourish to make the more pointed ends.




Now that the petals and sepals are keeping nice and warm on the warmer, I then make a very small tube bead. I put green on the end so that the leaves will integrate nicely in color when they are applied. I use the 30 degree angle on the stump marver to narrow the top of the rose cone, smaller than the rest of the tube bead.



I apply the first petal using the tweezer at the top of the petal. I pick up the fat rounded edge of the petal and bring it up high in the flame, waving it back and forth to warm it up to prevent breakage. I guestimate where the petal will hit the top of the rose cone, and direct my pinpoint flame at the bottom of the petal and press it into the cone. Continuing to direct the heat at the bottom of the petal, I let go of the tweezer on top, and use the side of the tweezer to press the bottom of the petal even more into the cone.



I then use the graphite rod and heating the bottom of the petal, smooth out the petal to the cone, and gently come up the side of the petal to adhere it closer to the cone top, creating a gentle curve at the top sides of the petal.



The top of the petal is then gently shaped with the non-serrated tweezers in any fashion you like. The general heat generated by the pinpoint flame, is sufficient to keep the entire flower warm and prevent shock breakage



You keep adding flower petals around the cone and previous petals, doing the same as above. If in doing this the petals edges become too thick, then use the non serrated tweezers as a press, and mash the petal edges in between the tweezer handles to thin them out, then flame that petal edge to remove the impression.



The sepals are the last to be added, with their fat side heated and attached to bottom of the cone and marvered up the petals with the graphite rod.



I continue adding the sepals, overlapping them, in order to completely cover the base.



The end result




CC Maureen Kennedy 2005 -Not to be published nor maintained electronically on any other person's website I give permission for this tutorial to be on Wetcanvas website for instructional purposes only. I do not give permission for anyone to copy this tutorial and publish in any written or electronic form any where else.
Hi Maureen, just wanted to thank you again for this tut....my daughter just found out she's having a little girl in March...her name will be Aurora Rose...now you have inspired me to master this technique for her!!!!! You rock sista!
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