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Old 05-30-2005, 01:06 AM
Mark Wilson's Avatar
Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Stove Pipe Annealer

first off, the name is Mark, not Mike. i cannot tell you how many times i get called mike around here. anyway, some time ago, i promiced to build a kiln that was so easy, so cheap, that anyone could build it. i finished the kiln today and tested it out. i wanted to do that so that i knew for sure that it would work.

i call this kiln my stove pipe annealer. it is designed to be a batch annealer for beads. it is not designed to be an anneal as you go kiln. i made it for about $25 worth of parts that you can get at any hardware store. the only thing that you cannot get at the hardware store is the 2 fire bricks, fiberboard, and the frax that i used for insulation. those items can be purchased at several online place. i used a 120v cooking stove element as the heat soruce, the same kind you used to cook dinner on tonight. i used a steel saw blade as the thermal spreadder, ad a variety of steel vent pipe and stove pipe pieces that you can find anywhere. the hardest thing you have to do is cut a notch ina piece of firebrick which cuts like butter.
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Old 05-30-2005, 01:09 AM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

you mount the heating element on the bricks so that the electrical connection goes into the notch in the brick that you just cut. you may need to bend the metal tabs of the heating element so that it will fit inside your 6inch long 8 inch diameter stove pipe piece which is the outside of the kiln. you put some frax down loaw near the burner to provide insulation and use a screwdriver to pack it in good and tight. i use metal bands and sheet rock screws to hold it all together using a cordless screw driver.
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Old 05-30-2005, 01:13 AM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

i drilled a hole in the center of the metal ring that is in the center of the heating element. i used a screw to hold a 4 inch diameter steel vent endcap to the hole in the steel ring of the burner. this screw will go through the hole in the steel saw blade.
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Old 05-30-2005, 01:14 AM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

i used a wire to help allign the holes so the screw would go in easy. then i put a 4 inch long 4 inch diameter steel duct adaptor into the inner steel vent cap and filled the gap between the inner and outer steel vents with frax. you could use vermiculite in a pinch, but i prefer frax.
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Last edited by Mark Wilson : 05-30-2005 at 01:17 AM.
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Old 05-30-2005, 01:21 AM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

i use steel bands to hold the stove pipe to the bricks, and to hold the bricks together, and to attatch the electric box which is insulated with frax to keep the wires cooler.
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Old 05-30-2005, 01:24 AM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

you want to cook the beads like in an oven not like in a frying pan. so i used two of the teracotta planter bases. one is flipped upside down and rests at the bottom of the inside. the a 2nd teracotta base is used as the dish that will hold your beads. you can have several of these and you can use the coated with kiln wash or not.

i hooked up the wires, made a lid and its done.

guess what????? my wife is out of town with my digital camera, so i can't show you the final series of pictures yet. i will post a last series of photos as soon as i have a camera again. i fired the kiln up for the first time outside, because there will be a lot of stinky stuff bakeing out of the kiln. i let it cook on high for a couple of hours. just by looking at it i could tell it was about 1200F. then i drilled a small hole for a TC and hooked it up to a temperature controller. i got it to 950F in about 30 to 40 minutes.
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Last edited by Mark Wilson : 05-30-2005 at 01:30 AM.
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Old 05-30-2005, 02:55 AM
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Roxy Roxy is offline
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Smile Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

Mark,

Thanks for this! I am going to show this to my husband tomorrow morning. You are so creative and generous. I appreciate your willingness to share you knowledge with others. I subscribed to this thread so I can be sure to see the last set of pictures.

Roxy

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Old 05-30-2005, 02:58 AM
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Beth Myers Beth Myers is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy
Mark,

You are so creative and generous. I appreciate your willingness to share you knowledge with others.
Roxy



I so agree! As always THANK YOU Mark, you are the bomb!
Beth
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Old 05-30-2005, 03:19 AM
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Wilson
first off, the name is Mark, not Mike. i cannot tell you how many times i get called mike around here. anyway, some time ago, i promiced to build a kiln that was so easy, so cheap, that anyone could build it. i finished the kiln today and tested it out. i wanted to do that so that i knew for sure that it would work.

i call this kiln my stove pipe annealer. it is designed to be a batch annealer for beads. it is not designed to be an anneal as you go kiln. i made it for about $25 worth of parts that you can get at any hardware store. the only thing that you cannot get at the hardware store is the 2 fire bricks, fiberboard, and the frax that i used for insulation. those items can be purchased at several online place. i used a 120v cooking stove element as the heat soruce, the same kind you used to cook dinner on tonight. i used a steel saw blade as the thermal spreadder, ad a variety of steel vent pipe and stove pipe pieces that you can find anywhere. the hardest thing you have to do is cut a notch ina piece of firebrick which cuts like butter.

Hey Mikes not such a bad name.

Mike
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Old 05-30-2005, 05:52 AM
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Matthew Losee Matthew Losee is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

I did one quite similar recently, my folks just got back midnight today; they were in NY. They had the digi cam with them, so I haven't been able to post the pics. It cost me $25 also. That includes everything except for the pyrometer and a very very small amount of fiberfrax. Mine is going to be a clamshell deal, though - Have a pulley on the cealing and lift it that way. The unfortunate part of my kiln is that the vermiculite is not as good at insulating as fiberfrax. The sacrifice, should you choose to use vermiculite instead of fiberfrax, is a little energy efficiency and therefore the sides get rather hot (i.e. boiling sort of temperature), which is why the pulley system is in place.
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Old 05-30-2005, 06:03 AM
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Lizabeads Lizabeads is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

First my name is Elizabeth..not Liz not Beth.. Elizabeth...
Just kidding Mark.. I'm going back and checking to make sure I didn't call you Mike because I remember that problem coming up before and I try not to do that since I often have a problem with my name... course I have been called worse..
NOW on to the important serious stuff...
Just when I think you can't surprise me anymore.. you come up with another brain storm !! I just seem to have brain farts...lol
I'm going to figure out how to give you top stars... (I've never done that before) and I hope that someone will make this another one of your tutorials...
Thanks again for sharing all your knowledge with us..
ELIZABETH
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Old 05-30-2005, 06:06 AM
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sterrekind sterrekind is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

MARK,

I love your creativity according finding new ways of making tools!!! I wish I could just go out and buy the things I need for an anealer like this, but The Netherlands are kind of ... eh how do I say this , left behind in glass and tools

Most hardware stores have never heard of a diamond drill bit to clean out bead holes.. let alone the things I need to make myself one of those annealers. I do believe the mailbox anealer was yours as well? I loved that one even better ( just because it was a mailbox, thought that was way cool!)

Suzanne
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Old 05-30-2005, 09:14 AM
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

amazing work, as usual !

now, tell us,
- how do you control it?
do you add anything like a dimmer-controller,
or do you simply let it take it's natural graph of
ramping up, staying hot, then ramping down.
is this why you use the massive blocks on the bottom?
to give the whole thing a heat-mass? to slow down heating and cooling?

-will the heat generated in your annealer be enough for boro?

-do you realize that in about 150 years from now, you will be known
as "St. Mark (not Mike!), patron of hot-glass"?
people will put beads on your altar, praying for a good annealing,
and donate gazing balls to church, wishing their children grow up to be good gaffers.

this one is certainly for the 101 section.
( heck, there should be a "Mark" section ! )
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Old 05-30-2005, 09:35 AM
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Mark Wilson Mark Wilson is offline
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Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

the 2 contacts of the heating element were connected to the black and white wires of a heavy duty power cord. the green wire was connected to the ground lug in the power box which is connected to all of the metal bands, the inner heated tube and the outer stove pipe so that everything is grounded. i used a home made temperature controller (see my temp controller tutorial). you simply plug the kiln into the controller, and insert a thermocouple into a hole that i drilled in the side of the kiln. i am going to make a lamp dimmer controller for it as well, but a temperature controller is the preferded method to control the temperature. it gets plenty hot. in fack i believe that i could even do some fused glass in it. i know it will get to 1050F which is the annealing temperature of boro.

please save your prayers for out father in heaven, i will never be a saint, more closely, i may be called DARTH MARK!!!! you can build this kiln, it is EXTREMELY EASY. and it is very inexpensive. you can even scrounge parts. "Honey, where is the element out of the stove?", "Hey, some one stole my smoke stack, what the he--?". yes mike, mike is a good name, just not for me. beth, i am not the bomb, but i did build a lot of them in high school.
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Old 05-30-2005, 10:56 AM
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Judy in MN Judy in MN is offline
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Thumbs up Re: Stove Pipe Annealer

Ingenious, Mike! (just kidding, I've always known you were Mark). Your batch annealer is a neat idea and it's very good of you to share it with us. I know how you feel about annealing glass--this will help folks who for one reason or another don't wish to fork out $500 or more for a kiln. This is a terrific addition to the tech forum!

One note to all about high temps and terracotta--Not sure about boro temps but from what I've read on warmglass.com and other places, terracotta will not last very long at fusing temps, so if you fuse, be prepared to replace that terracotta fairly often. Also, terracotta can hold a lot of moisture, so the first time you fire it, you may want to bring the temp up slowly so any moisture inside can dissipate, or you may have a small explosion in your new kiln.

Judy in MN
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