WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting > Painting from the Masters
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 02:47 AM
Yokovich's Avatar
Yokovich Yokovich is offline
A Local Legend
Portland OR
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,856
 
Hails from United States
Use to denote nudity/mature subject matter Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Welcome to the May Master of the Month! The paintings selected for copying this month are Destiny and A Mermaid by John William Waterhouse.

Destiny
painting date: 1900
medium: Oil on canvas
size: 68.5 x 55 cm
location: Towneley Hall Art Gallery, Burnley, England



http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=9643 (Click here for high resolution version)

In 1899 the Boer War had begun in South Africa, and in the spring of 1900 350 artists donated works to the Artists' War Fund in support of the British troops. After being exhibited in the London Guildhall, the pictures were auctioned by Christie's, who waived the £12,000 profit in favor of the Fund. Destiny was painted by Waterhouse especially for the cause, as shown by his own inscription 'Artists' War Fund' above his signature, and was selected by The Studio as one of the most noteworthy in the exhibition. The girl drinking a libation to the departing heroes was a favourite model for the rest of his career; statuesque in her beauty, she casts a sympathetic gaze towards the ships already under sail. Waterhouse's setting is typical of his origins - Italianate and geometrical: the circles of the mirror and its stand are repeated in the arches of the tiled loggia and the front of the lectern.

A Mermaid
painting date: 1900
medium: Oil on canvas
size: 98 x 67 cm
location: Royal Academy of Arts, London, England



http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=773 (Click here for high resolution version)

This painting was Waterhouse's diploma work for the Royal Academy. [b]A Mermaid[b] (masculine Merman) was a fabled marine creature with the head and upper body of a human being and the tail of a fish. Similar divine or semidivine beings appear in ancient mythologies (e.g., the Chaldean sea god Ea, or Oannes). In European folklore, mermaids (sometimes called sirens) and mermen were natural beings who, like fairies, had magical and prophetic powers. They loved music and often sang. Though very long-lived, they were mortal and had no souls. Many folktales record marriages between mermaids (who might assume human form) and men. In most, the man steals the mermaid's cap or belt, her comb or mirror. While the objects are hidden she lives with him; if she finds them she returns at once to the sea. In some variants the marriage lasts while certain agreed-upon conditions are fulfilled, and it ends when the conditions are broken. Though sometimes kindly, mermaids and mermen were usually dangerous to man. Their gifts brought misfortune, and, if offended, the beings caused floods or other disasters. To see one on a voyage was an omen of shipwreck. They sometimes lured mortals to death by drowning, as did the Lorelei of the Rhine, or enticed young people to live with them underwater, as did the mermaid whose image is carved on a bench in the church of Zennor, Cornwall, Eng.
Source: Encyclopædia Britannica


Biography of John William Waterhouse


Born: Rome, 1849
Died: London, 1917

Painter of classical, historical, and literary subjects. John William Waterhouse was born in 1849 in Rome, where his father worked as a painter. He was referred to as "Nino" throughout his life. In the 1850s the family returned to England. Before entering the Royal Academy schools in 1870, Waterhouse assisted his father in his studio. His early works were of classical themes in the spirit of Alma-Tadema and Frederic Leighton, and were exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Society of British Artists and the Dudley Gallery. In the late 1870s and the 1880s, Waterhouse made several trips to Italy, where he painted genre scenes.

After his marriage in 1883 to Esther Kenworthy, he took up residence at the Primrose Hill Studios. He was elected to the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolour in 1883 and resigned in 1889. In 1884, his Royal Academy submission 'Consulting the Oracle' brought him favourable reviews; it was purchased by Sir Henry Tate, who also purchased 'The Lady of Shalott' from the 1888 Academy exhibition. The latter painting reveals Waterhouse's growing interest in themes associated with the Pre-Raphaelites, particularly tragic or powerful femmes fatales, as well as plein-air painting. In 1885 he was elected an associate of the Royal Academy and a full member in 1895.

In the mid-1880s Waterhouse began exhibiting with the Grosvenor Gallery and its successor, the New Gallery, as well as provincial exhibitions in Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester. Paintings of this period, such as 'Mariamne' (1889), were exhibited widely in England and abroad as part of the international symbolist movement. In the 1890s Waterhouse began to exhibit portraits. In 1901 he moved to St John's Wood and joined the St John's Wood Arts Club, a social organization that included Lawrence Alma-Tadema and George Clausen. He also served on the advisory council of the Saint John's Wood Art School.

Waterhouse continued to paint until his death in 1917. His grave can be found at Kensal Green Cemetery in London.

For previous discussions about Waterhouse methods and palette http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show...hreadid=215193
Please join us and paint one of these two beautiful Waterhouse paintings! Well, and if you can't decide which one to do....do both!

Last edited by Yokovich : 05-01-2005 at 03:00 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 03:53 AM
Squib Squib is offline
Enthusiast
Oxfordshire, UK
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,789
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Wonderful article Celeste. I'm definitely in on this one. I hope to do both - yes, high hopes ! But I will start with Destiny. I will prepare my board this morning, and get started this afternoon. Tomorrow is a holiday here, so I should make some progress. (I shouldn't be saying this. Every time I commit to anything, I end up getting side-tracked ) I am going with a really well-coated board - as many coats of gesso as I can - till I run out of patience !

I need to read more about his technique too, so will scrutinise the other thread first. This one is going to be great fun !!!
__________________
Lorraine

My Blog - A Brush in the Hand
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:26 AM
bjs0704's Avatar
bjs0704 bjs0704 is offline
A Local Legend
Chicago , the "Windy City"
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,029
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Celestia

Your write-up on Waterhouse is excellent! It is really nice to have the additional background to these paintings!

I am still playing "eeny, meeny, miny, moe" on this one! Deciding which one to do is a tough decision! I think that I will be doing "Destiny"!

Barb Solomon
__________________
Visit my website at:
www.geocities.com/bjsart2000
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:33 AM
irish artist's Avatar
irish artist irish artist is offline
Enthusiast
great lakes area
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,239
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Waterhouse's life seems to have gotten off with a big start since his father was also a painter. Wyeth had the same advantage, he was born to a painting family since his father, N.C. Wyeth was famous in his time also. Wyeth was removed for school and home-schooled in both academics and art.

I was going to ask about technique and I noticed that you had a link about it and when I followed the link it was something called a 'DAD', meaning 'Do A Duplicate', which is a thread of people who decided to paint any Waterhouse they wanted and talking about it and what they used but nowhere did I find enough information about the actual artist's technique. Perhaps I just missed it in one of the numerous pages......

Last edited by irish artist : 05-01-2005 at 08:51 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 09:21 AM
jo_b's Avatar
jo_b jo_b is offline
Enthusiast
Minnesota
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,741
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Great write up Celestia!
They are both beautiful pieces!I'm afraid I won't be able to join in this month, too much on my plate already, but I will be following everone's progress.
Good Luck Everybody! Have a Great Time Painting

Jodi
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 11:04 AM
Yokovich's Avatar
Yokovich Yokovich is offline
A Local Legend
Portland OR
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,856
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish artist
Waterhouse's life seems to have gotten off with a big start since his father was also a painter. Wyeth had the same advantage, he was born to a painting family since his father, N.C. Wyeth was famous in his time also. Wyeth was removed for school and home-schooled in both academics and art.

I was going to ask about technique and I noticed that you had a link about it and when I followed the link it was something called a 'DAD', meaning 'Do A Duplicate', which is a thread of people who decided to paint any Waterhouse they wanted and talking about it and what they used but nowhere did I find enough information about the actual artist's technique. Perhaps I just missed it in one of the numerous pages......
lol --sorry for the wild goose chase, irish--I could have SWORN there was discussion in that thread about Waterhouse technique! I am afraid I haven't actually got bonafide information pertaining to his methods. I will look further and return information to this thread if I find something.
Squib! I understand about wondering if you are "jinxing" yourself by stating that you WILL paint a particular piece--lol! It has happened to me several times too--ah...but come on--look at Destiny and Mermaid!! They ARE calling like sirens. lol
Barb, thanks for the kudos--YOU are such a tough act to follow because you are so thorough with the classic subjects--I was very squeamish to have to follow the likes of you in the MOM threads --lol! thanks for your approval!
I will be looking forward to seeing your work!
jo_b jodi--sorry you won't be hanging with us this month but hope you'll still pop in from time to time nevertheless!
For myself I think I am leaning toward Destiny--all Waterhouse paintings are exquisite--but ool la la--that red! Hope I have enough tubes. lol.
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 12:19 PM
CareyG CareyG is offline
A Local Legend
Georgia
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 9,077
 
Hails from United States
Another month! There ought to be some good participation in this one!

Regarding the other thread...I started that one up as, at the time, several of us here were doing Waterhouse copies....and I've been glad to see that others have participated, as well! (The thread is "open" for continued participation!) That thread is a good resource for those who are going to participate in this month's MOM. It is, however, a lengthy thread and you'll need to do quite a bit of reading in it, but there IS a *great deal* of discussion on techniques/etc. Not saying it's all "correct" info, but it is there nonetheless. I'd post my own thoughts on Waterhouse's techniques here (again, not saying I'm necessarily correct on it!), but it's all in the other thread and I'd just be repeating myself. It's always hard trying to divine how another artist worked, ufortunately!

IrishArtist, perhaps you meant to find definitive information on how Waterhouse painted? I've been looking looooong and haaaard for months and months to find some definitive online info and I'm afraid that I can't find anything that would classify as a "this is how Waterhouse did this" kind of thing. Hands down the best resource available (unless someone else has managed to find something else!!) is Peter Trippi's book, but of course I don't think we're all going to rush out and buy that. (Though they did just come out with a softcover edition!) I'm afraid that all we have to work with are individual artists's interpretations of how we think Waterhouse painted. But I do think that there's a lot of good info in that thread and it's probably the best we're gonna get, unfortunately, as far as that goes.

But...good luck everyone! I'll be looking forward to seeing everyone contribute here, it's always a learning experience for me.

~!Carey

P.S. Hey, don't mean to sound like a miss-know-it-all if I come across like that. Just trying to give my thoughts as I've been looking into this myself quite a bit! If my thoughts help someone else, great, if you think I'm full of bull doody, well, that's okay, too!
__________________
The Blue Monocle - The Crawling Eye - Zaney Zebras


"...I wished to live deliberately...and not, when I came to die, discover that I have not lived." ---Henry David Thoreau

Last edited by CareyG : 05-01-2005 at 12:28 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 12:27 PM
Yokovich's Avatar
Yokovich Yokovich is offline
A Local Legend
Portland OR
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,856
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Our resident Waterhouse Maven Carey is here! Thanks for stopping in! I know you can throw in some pointers girlfriend!

I am adding the following information pertaining to the Venetian Method that Waterhouse employed. At the end is an educated guess pertaining to palette. The operative word is GUESS. lol.

THE VENETIAN TECHNIQUE

In the Venetian Technique, color is often applied over the underpainting initially as transparent glazes, which are then worked into, while wet, with opaque pigments. The paint is worked together wet into wet until the desired effect is achieved, or until the paint becomes slightly tacky, at which time it is allowed to dry thoroughly. This process may be repeated as many times as necessary.

At some point, someone, perhaps Titian, discovered that a light, opaque tone, rendered semitransparent by the addition of a bit more oil and/or simply by scrubbing it on thinly with a stiff brush, applied over a darker area produced an effect that could be put to good use. This is what we now call a scumble. It was found that a scumble over a flesh tone would produce the same effect as powder on a woman's face; that is, it made its texture appear softer. This is a useful device when painting women and young people of both sexes. It is also useful for indicating atmospheric density over distance, or atmospheric perspective. See Chapter Five, Principles of Visual Reality. Both glazing and scumbling create optical illusions. As such they effectively expand the capabilities of the limited palette of the early painters in oil. It was imperative that they get the most out of the materials they had.

Glazing is the application of a darker transparent paint over a lighter area. The optical illusion created by the light rays’ having passed through a transparent darker layer, bouncing off the lighter surface underneath, then traveling back through the transparent layer to the viewer’s eyes, is unique to glazing, and cannot be obtained in any other manner. A warm glow is created, and the color thus produced appears warmer and more saturated (higher in chroma) than the same pigment applied more thickly and opaquely. The effect, in the darker passages, is that of a shadow seen up close, with no atmosphere between the viewer’s eyes and itself. The rich, golden glow in Rembrandt's dark browns is produced in this way. Rembrandt was influenced by Titian, and is reported to have at one time owned at least one of his paintings. Glazed darks appear darker than opaque darks, because the light rays are allowed to penetrate more deeply into the paint layer, and are thus subjected to a great deal of filtration before reflecting back out to the viewer’s eyes. This effectively expands the value range possible with paints, which are handicapped on the light end of the spectrum by the fact that white paint is not as light as light in Nature. The Old Masters compensated by carrying their darks as far as they could, to create as wide a range of values as possible. This can only be accommodated through the use of transparent paints on the dark extreme. Furthermore, as light contains color, the artist must make the highlights darker than white in order to include color in them. This further limits the value range, and makes necessary the darkening of all tones by a corresponding amount in order to maintain the proper contrast and relationships between each category of light or shadow. Transparent darks allow the expansion of the dark end of the range.

Scumbling is the opposite of glazing. A scumble uses a lighter opaque paint, spread thinly enough so as to become translucent, over a darker passage. The optical effect thus produced is bluer than the paint applied, as the underlying layer is not completely obscured, and exerts its influence on the overall sensation, as has been previously described. It is very effective in softening surface textures, as soft cloth, such as velvet or cotton, or youthful complexions, the surface of a peach, etc., and, as mentioned, for indicating atmospheric haze over distant land planes and in the sky near the horizon. Overcast skies may be scumbled all over, as in Bouguereau’s “The Broken Pitcher.”

There are still more advanced and sophisticated developments of the Venetian Technique. The "semiglaze", which can be either transparent or semiopaque, or anywhere in between, is a very thin application of color to an area of the same value as the paint being applied. Its purpose is to modify the color of a given area after that area is dry, as in the addition of a tiny bit of vermilion to a cheek or nose, and/or to allow subsequent wet into wet painting over an area in which the paint has dried. It tends to soften unintended too-harsh transitions of tone from the previous sitting, if used properly, and thereby adds a higher degree of refinement to the image. It is applied thinly, by scrubbing it on with a stiff brush, after the addition of a small amount of oil or a painting medium to lubricate the dry surface of the area to be repainted. Titian is reported to have sometimes applied glazes and semiglazes with his fingers, or perhaps he was wiping the excess away after having put too much on with a brush. Stippling with a flat tipped brush is a good technique for applying glazes, scumbles, and semiglazes, though other means work very well in skilled hands. As a further development of the Venetian Technique, the underpainting, or certain parts of it, may be executed in opaque color, rather than totally in neutral greys. One popular variation was Venetian Red and Flake White. The underpainting palette should be limited to lean paints (paints with low oil absorption) which are opaque and/or very high in tinting strength. High tinting strength fat paints (paints with high oil absorption) may be used if mixed in very small quantities with very lean paints like Flake White. The objective is to keep the underpainting leaner than the layers applied over it. When dry, the color may then be subsequently modified with glazes, scumbles, and semiglazes, or painted over with opaque color. These steps may be repeated as many times as necessary. The highlights are placed last, applied wet into wet with a fully loaded brush. Impasto is often employed in the highlights, to produce the most opaque passages possible, and to ensure that they remain opaque. Oil paints become more transparent with age. Therefore, in order for the highlights to retain their opacity over the centuries, they must be applied heavily. The illusion thus created is that of direct light falling on a solid surface, ricocheting from that surface to our eyes. It is not actually an illusion, as that is exactly what is happening. Juxtaposed with the transparent shadows, the illusion of depth is thus enhanced.

The underpainting, sometimes referred to as a grisaille if done in greys, should have its darkest passages painted somewhat lighter than the desired final effect, or the superimposed colors will lose much of their brightness and depth . Except for certain special effects, as in the technique of Rembrandt, the texture of the underpainting should be as smooth as possible. Any brushstrokes not smoothed out before the underpainting is dry, or scraped down before painting over, will produce a problem area in the next stage. Artists who prefer visible brushstrokes should decide where to place them in the final stages of the painting, as accents.

The Venetian Technique allows the widest range of possibilities of any oil painting method yet developed. Its systematic use of opaque passages, glazes, scumbles and semiglazes stretches the capabilities of oil paint to the absolute limits, and allows the artist the greatest latitude for adjusting the picture at any stage. The employment of the optical illusions created by glazing and scumbling, combined with the control of edges (selective focus), enables the oil painter who has mastered it to indicate three dimensional reality more convincingly than is possible with any other technique.


It should be stressed that the wonderful results achieved by the Old Masters and other great painters were attributable, in great measure, to the preparations undertaken prior to their beginning work on the final canvas or panel. The concept for the painting had first to be worked out in smaller drawings, sketches and studies done on separate surfaces, to solve all the problems to the artist's satisfaction beforehand. This accounts for the impression most often conveyed by their paintings, of having been executed without the necessity of corrections. In truth, there were many corrections, but the major ones, at least, were most often solved in the study stage before the painting itself was touched. For very large paintings, the usual practice was for the Master to paint the painting first on a smaller scale to work out its composition, and then turn it over to his apprentices to be transferred to the large canvas by means of a grid. Refer to the sidebar for a more detailed description of the grid method of enlarging a design. In some cases, the smaller painting was done without color, to be used by the apprentices as a guide in applying the underpainting to the large canvas, which process the Master would oversee, and usually correct and complete after the students and/or apprentices had done most of the work. Often many supplemental studies were drawn and painted by the Master, either to aid the assistants in painting the large picture, or to solve some of the problems for himself, in the development of the concept for the painting. This practice is as much a factor in the excellent quality of the works these great painters produced as were the actual painting techniques they used so well.


A guess of colors employed in Destiny and A Mermaid:

Naples Yellow (lead antimonate)
Yellow-Ochre
Chrome Yellow, dark
Viridian
Cobalt Blue
White Lead
Light Vermilion
Chinese Vermilion
Mars Brown (iron oxide); this available from Lefranc & Bourgeois Van Dyck Brown
Burnt Sienna
Ivory Black
Bitumen
Genuine Rose Madder, dark

whew! Well, for myself I am going to try the grey grisaille underpainting which will be a first for me! I am looking forward to spending some time with one painting instead of "dashing" through in a hurry. If anyone has further ideas about the color palette please tell us!

Last edited by Yokovich : 05-01-2005 at 12:45 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 12:33 PM
CareyG CareyG is offline
A Local Legend
Georgia
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 9,077
 
Hails from United States
Quote:
Originally Posted by celestia
Our resident Waterhouse Maven Carey is here! Thanks for stopping in! I know you can throw in some pointers girlfriend!

Haha, uh oh, don't go encouraging my miss-know-it-all attitude!

Thanks for that added info, Celestia!

~!Carey
__________________
The Blue Monocle - The Crawling Eye - Zaney Zebras


"...I wished to live deliberately...and not, when I came to die, discover that I have not lived." ---Henry David Thoreau
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 02:24 PM
artbabe21's Avatar
artbabe21 artbabe21 is offline
A WC! Legend
Montana
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 11,951
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Wow...Celestia! Super job with the write up with all that information!! Thanks!
I'd love to participate this month so I'll just jump on the thread here & hope I get busy. Have not been painting in a long while......and I miss it!!
__________________
Cathleen~

~Be COURAGEOUS, It's one of the few places left still uncrowded~



~Life is not measured by it's length BUT by it's depth~
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 03:29 PM
Yokovich's Avatar
Yokovich Yokovich is offline
A Local Legend
Portland OR
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,856
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Quote:
Originally Posted by artbabe21
Wow...Celestia! Super job with the write up with all that information!! Thanks!
I'd love to participate this month so I'll just jump on the thread here & hope I get busy. Have not been painting in a long while......and I miss it!!
Welcome artbabe--it is always a pleasure to have you in a thread!! especially here with our two "other" art-babes, Destiny and Mermaid! lol
Reply With Quote
  #12   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 04:36 PM
Squib Squib is offline
Enthusiast
Oxfordshire, UK
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,789
 
Hails from United Kingdom
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Hi All,

Celeste - thanks for the additional information. There is a lot to digest !
Carey - are you doing this one ??
Jodi - you can cheer us on.
Irish - ready when you are !
Cathleen - it will be great if you can join in.

Well, I started and it feels good ! I am going actual size here. It is such a nice size too. I hate painting on a small canvas so this is perfect. The drawing took a couple of hours. I drew it in pencil, and then went over the drawing in a turpsy burnt sienna. Celeste, that palette looks good, so I may just go with it. I am thinking of doing an underpainting of raw umber & burnt sienna. I'll think about it overnight, and decide by the morning.

Drawing of Destiny
55 x 68.5cm

__________________
Lorraine

My Blog - A Brush in the Hand
Reply With Quote
  #13   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 05:04 PM
irish artist's Avatar
irish artist irish artist is offline
Enthusiast
great lakes area
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,239
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Thanks Celestia!! I had read in the DAD that Waterhouse used thin layers without an undercoat but I'll follow your research and see how well it works to duplicate Waterhouse since it is the technique favered by my art class instructor and I should be practicing it anyway to get good grades in class.

After a quick sketch-in and the first coat begun for Waterhouse's Mermaid:
Attached Images
 
Reply With Quote
  #14   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:42 PM
bjs0704's Avatar
bjs0704 bjs0704 is offline
A Local Legend
Chicago , the "Windy City"
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 8,029
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

Lorrainne - Your off to a good start! It’s a lovely drawing. It is a lovely painting at this “line art” stage!

Irish Artist - You’ve got a nice blocked-in grissaille!

Jodi - Thanks for dropping in! It’s too bad that you won’t be able to paint! Thanks for the encouragement!

look at Destiny and Mermaid!! They ARE calling like sirens. lol
LOL!!! Celeste, you are too funny!

I can totally understand your feelings! Too be honest, I have had the hardest time finding information about HOW the 19th painters painted! It is hard to find out about their paint choices and it’s hard to find out about their favorite techniques. Some of them were really advanced, in terms of craft, so it is can be a complicated thing.

Celeste - To sum up, what you are saying and be certain that I have you right - Waterhouse would have used the Venetian technique. Then, I should be able to use a similar approach to the one used by Titian except that I use the colors that you are suggesting.


He’s a late enough painter that he would have had a broad range of colors and may have used bought tube oil paints.

Principles of Visual Reality - Which book is this?

Celeste - Your descriptions of techinique are excellent!

And these methods are so useful for a painter to learn!

Irish Artist, Carey, Katleen, Lorraine - Wow!!! It's nice to see so many people have joined in! Good luck with it!

Barb Solomon


__________________
Visit my website at:
www.geocities.com/bjsart2000
Reply With Quote
  #15   Report Bad Post  
Old 05-01-2005, 08:50 PM
Yokovich's Avatar
Yokovich Yokovich is offline
A Local Legend
Portland OR
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,856
 
Hails from United States
Re: Master of the Month #17 May 2005 (J W Waterhouse)

squib ---wonderful accurate line drawing!! spot on!! I love everything about it!
do you know what your canvas measures in inches?
irish artist nice block in for mermaid! you two are doing well starting right on May 1!
Barb--I know it has been written that Waterhouse used both Venetian technique together with direct painting--I am anxious to see if I can get anywhere near that luminous red in the dress!
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:35 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.