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Old 03-28-2005, 01:40 PM
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Paint like Pino?

Where can you learn to paint like this?:

Pino's Website

I'm not interested in learning oils. I'd love to be able to learn this style using acrylics.
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Old 03-28-2005, 04:02 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

Well, learn it just like you would learn oils! Either sign up for some lessons or find a teacher (or some books) about oils or acrylics in this kind of style. As with anything, you'll need to start with the basics to learn different techniques and brushwork to see what will give you the effects you need. As you learn you can look at Pino's paintings close up to see what technique he used in different areas of the painting.

One way of starting - try to do a copy! You'll learn loads that way too. I'd recommend either the Encyclopedia of Acrylic Painting Techniques or the oil version (they are essentially the same in content). You may need to experiment with some mediums and retarders to have some 'open' time with the paint too.

Practice practice practice.

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Old 03-28-2005, 04:12 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

I'm asking about any learning materials that anyone knows about to assist in learning Pino's type of style. I've already got the basics of acrylic painting down. I have been studying Jerry Yarnell for about 3 years now.
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Old 03-28-2005, 04:13 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

I agree with Tina, if you want to paint in a similar style as an artist. Do a copy of their work - as an exercise!

Remember to acknowledge the original artist and that you have copied the work so that people won't ever be confused that it isn't one of your originals.

Pino does do lovely work, though. I'd love to be able to paint like him.

I would try to get a good print of his work to copy from tho'. Images from the net tend to be difficult to "see".

Hope this helps.

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Old 03-28-2005, 06:28 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

The April/May 2005 issue of International Artist has an article called "The Beauty of Inner Vision" which may give you a start. Not Pino but a similar look and feel.
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Old 03-28-2005, 06:49 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

You may also want to consider studying the works of Maxfield Parrish, and John Singer Sargent. They seem to have had some influence on the painter in question. There is also a school that is advertised in many of the arts mags about "realist" tradition painting classes and drawing classes. May be antoher way is to join a realist group in your area if you can find artists of interstest to you. Ingres and David may also be worth looking at very closely. Just a humble thought.
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Old 03-29-2005, 09:42 AM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

Good luck with your wish to paint like Pino -- his paintings are beautiful. I agree with several of the other messages -- copy one of Pino's paintings, but acknowledge it as a copy of his work. You will get a lot of knowledge from working this way.

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Old 03-29-2005, 01:14 PM
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You're going to find it very difficult to find any book that will teach you how to use acrylics quite like this as it's actually very difficult to paint exactly like this in our medium!

Now this of course depends on quite how close you want to get, but first and foremost you'll need to draw as well as he does - this is vital - and will represent at least a years' work in its own right. After that I would suggest just what you've already had recommended, try copying a painting of his and see how you get on. If you come up against specific problems then focus on those areas in exercises and then try again. Remember, some dedicated painters have done dozens of copies of master works in an attempt to get insights into their working method and even if you don't arrive at a technique that is like theirs you just need to develop some that work for you.

I can tell you straight away that the primary issue you'll face from the painting standpoint will be trying to match the blending, which will probably force you to use blending medium and/or retarders to slow the drying time, but even with this you'll have to learn to paint quickly.

I have a little insight into what you might be up against here, a few years back I finally sat down and tried to replicate Patrick Nagel's style digitally after years of admiring his work and thinking about it. Now this is MUCH simpler than trying to match any realistic painting style (especially in a completely different medium) but it still took weeks of closely studying every piece of his work that I had reproductions of - how exactly did he choose to do that line, what decision might he have made to come to this stylisation of the eyes or lips, why did he choose that colour for the background? - and then about five or six pieces of my own before I was happy enough that I had the style down to a reasonable degree. Even at that I was referring to his work pretty regularly for about a year afterward when I did a piece, trying to decide how he would tackle a certain part; this is significant, if you're like I was and you want to get the style precisely, until it becomes second nature you'll be wondering to yourself if you're doing it quite right, second guessing and referring back to his work to see how he tackled a passage... all of this will take time and as I said you'll have to be painting quickly for this to even be a possibility.

I'm not trying to quash your dream but I wanted to give you some real idea of the mountain you've set yourself to climb. It's scalable certainly, but you might want to try smaller hills first as realistic intermediary goals, there is a great danger of discouragement if you try something repeatedly and fail.

Towards that tend if you don't have good art instruction available locally the first thing I would suggest is buying a copy of Betty Edwards's The New Drawing On The Right Side Of The Brain and working through it. After that you may like to have a look at Ted Seth Jacob's book (sorry, the title escapes me ATM) and one or two other good books on anatomy and life drawing - definitely Civardi and Ryder, Sheppard and maybe Bridgman too. When you're done with these you should have another year or more's painting experience of your own and you might not need to seek any more instruction on that side of things, having developed techniques of your own that will work.

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Old 03-29-2005, 01:49 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

Sorry about my previous reply. Actually, I do agree with the others that trying a copy could be a great starting point. I copied Degas back when I was first learning and it was extremely enlightening! What was useful though was having someone else (my mentor) looking over my shoulder once in a while to think about what looked odd, how I might improve it, etc. Sometimes we do miss the obvious because of how we *think* it should be painted, when the artist has done something entirely different in a very clever way.

And yes, with realism like this drawing is one of the most important things. Don't think colour, think monochrome first to work on values and stuff. (hmmm, how many Degases did I do all in blues first? ) In fact, try working on some small monochrome studies from the colour images!

You're aiming high. These are lovely paintings! (ps. Einion, had a look at Nagel... now I have to go get out some old Duran Duran albums! heh. - his Rio is one of the covers, in case you weren't a Durannie when you were 14 years old like I was)

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Old 03-29-2005, 08:17 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

I would guess that you would first have to be an expert in drawing the human figure from life before you concern yourself with painting.
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Old 03-30-2005, 02:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timelady
Sometimes we do miss the obvious because of how we *think* it should be painted, when the artist has done something entirely different in a very clever way.
Excellent point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by timelady
In fact, try working on some small monochrome studies from the colour images!
That is certainly worth trying, in black and white one could concentrate directly on emulating the brushstrokes without colour concerns distracting you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by timelady
Einion, had a look at Nagel... now I have to go get out some old Duran Duran albums! heh. - his Rio is one of the covers, in case you weren't a Durannie when you were 14 years old like I was)
Oh I wasn't a huge Duran Duran fan but I'm just the right age The Rio cover was one of the iconic images of the 80s, I was just disappointed they didn't continue it as a theme for future covers. I was lucky enough to see a decent amount of Nagel's work over the years before his untimely demise so I can't complain I suppose.

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Old 03-31-2005, 10:21 AM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

I have the drawing experience I need as well as a few years background in realistic landscape painting. I have even done some portrait work with both graphite and acrylics. I've yet to attempt oils mostly because of the logistics of safety and clean up with two small children in my office/studio a lot. I realize that the fast drying nature of acrylics is against me when it comes to painting in a style like Pino. I've found that the blending can be imitated to a degree by dry brushing, but it still will not render the same result as oils. I just recently bought a couple of tubes of Water Mixable Oils, and I may give those a shot. My first step, of course, would be to learn to work wet on wet more effectively than I do currently with acrylics. Copying another's work is something I haven't tried. With so many suggestions for that I may give that a shot once I get the basics down and get a good reference. Thank you all for your time and inputs.
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Old 03-31-2005, 05:25 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesbf
I have the drawing experience I need as well as a few years background in realistic landscape painting. I have even done some portrait work with both graphite and acrylics. I've yet to attempt oils mostly because of the logistics of safety and clean up with two small children in my office/studio a lot. I realize that the fast drying nature of acrylics is against me when it comes to painting in a style like Pino. I've found that the blending can be imitated to a degree by dry brushing, but it still will not render the same result as oils. I just recently bought a couple of tubes of Water Mixable Oils, and I may give those a shot. My first step, of course, would be to learn to work wet on wet more effectively than I do currently with acrylics. Copying another's work is something I haven't tried. With so many suggestions for that I may give that a shot once I get the basics down and get a good reference. Thank you all for your time and inputs.

I agree with Howard's suggestion of studying the work of John Singer Sargent, especially. Sargent is my favorite portrait artist and his work is absolutely superb. I have been a fan of Pino's for several years, also, and find his style very similar to Sargent's, although Pino's paintings seem to burst with glorious light. Much of Sargent's portrait work done indoors was done by candle light and whatever natural light was available. Both artists are masters at painting the human form, skin tones, fabrics, jewels--pretty much anything. There should be books on Sargent available in your local library.

It will be a challenge to try to achieve a style similar to Pino's with acrylics, but I have seen some wonderful examples of art done with acrylics that truly mimic oils. There are a couple of products that may help you achieve these results. One is made by Liquitex called High Viscosity Acrylic Matte Opaque Extender Gel Medium (Gelex). Unlike most of the acrylic mediums, this one does not make your colors more transparent (something I don't want) the more you mix it with your paints. It helps maintain the opacity of your paints, even adding to the opacity of semi-transparent colors. Equally important, it extends the blending time. Your acrylics will never behave like oils, but this Gelex medium has helped me to achieve results with my acrylics very similar to the way I paint with oil paints. Using stiffer brushes to help muscle the paint where you want it to go helps, too. Save the soft brushes for glazing.

Another method I use to help do soft blends with acrylics is to prewet my painting surface, then I may even paint on some soft gel medium (I use either gloss or satin/semi-gloss) and paint into it with my full-strength acrylic paints. You still have to work quickly, but keeping a spare brush handy, clean and just damp, to use to quickly blend and smooth areas where you are combining two colors or where you need to soften an edge, helps achieve those oil-like soft blends.

Beverly
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Old 03-31-2005, 06:18 PM
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Ben, I think you need to bear in mind that many of us will have looked at your site and seen your drawings and paintings and geared our comments accordingly

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Old 04-01-2005, 02:39 PM
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Re: Paint like Pino?

Thanks Beverly. This is good info.
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