WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Acrylics
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Closed Thread  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 03:38 AM
cunparis's Avatar
cunparis cunparis is offline
Veteran Member
Paris, France
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 936
 
Hails from United States
Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

I found an artist who I really like and was suprised to read that she paints in acrylics. Then I was suprised even more to find out she paints with a palette kinfe! Take a look: Dorsey McHugh Fine Art. I just love her texture. I haven't really thought about knife painting in acrylics before. I've done a few tests on paper and they dry so flat. I do a lot of knife painting but it's always with oils. So now I'm very interested in trying it with acrylic. I searched the archives and found one artist here, I already forgot his name "Edwards" I think, who gave his recipe. His paintings look very much like knife paintings done in oil. So I'm going to pick up some of the Golden mediums he suggested. But if anyone has any ideas on how Dorsey is able to achieve her texture I'm very interested. It's a totally different effect.

And I hope you enjoy her artwork as much as I did. I only wish her photos were larger.

-Michael
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 05:52 AM
gnu's Avatar
gnu gnu is offline
A Local Legend
Levin, New Zealand
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 9,480
 
Hails from New Zealand
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

it is a neat effect..
using a knife myself, I imagine she uses a small knife and almost 'pointilism' approach, with colour quite close in tone next to each other, but the edges blurring somewhat..(like squinting )
If they are large paintings, I imagine this is easier...
I like her effect, but I don't much like a lot of other knifework I see that is too blurry with no defined edges much at all..(at least in realism style)..
Her palette choices are cool..
BTW it's always easier to use heavy body acrylics or mix in an imapsto medium, half and half..
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 07:14 AM
Mark Newton's Avatar
Mark Newton Mark Newton is offline
Enthusiast
Adelaide, Australia
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,019
 
Hails from Australia
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

I would say Gill has pretty well got it in a nutshell. I would have thought knife would be a lot easier with acrylics than oils, been years since I painted oils. Because oil stays wet, using a knife would command much greater care or mud would result cf. acrylic that dries rapidly so textures can be added across the top without muddying within minutes. I use knife at times for ground work to build ground textures and rocks etc, very good way of creating textures. At the moment I tend to use a fan brush laden with dry thick impasto paint and drag it held flat across the surface to catch the gesso ridges and create texture. But the knife stills plays an important role, but cant imagine doing a whole painting with it, dont see the point really...personal taste. Also I cant imagine using a knife with anything other than impasto paint.


Cheers
__________________
Mark Newton
Adelaide, Australia
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 07:29 AM
NodakerDeb's Avatar
NodakerDeb NodakerDeb is offline
Immortalized
On the Dakota Prairie
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,703
 
Hails from Antarctica
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

Michael,

I have just recently started working in acrylics, and even more recently started doing entire paintings with a knife. Check out: http://www.deborahs-art.com/On%20The%20Easel.htm

I did that entire painting with Golden FLUID acrylics and Liquitex medium viscosity because I have them on hand. They worked great for the way I painted this because I was going for the layered look which showed the colors from underneath. I do think I'll be investing in some heavier bodied acrylics as time goes on and as I experiment with more of an impasto look.

I liked Dorsey's style, but don't care for the subject matter much. A little to "painter of light" for me, and I loathe those paintings. Just my opinion, and what do I know? ... Mr. Painter of Light has made a fortune so he is obviously on to something

Mark, the best reason I can come up with for using a knife for the whole painting is EASY CLEAN UP .
__________________

My Paintings
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 08:06 AM
lensman's Avatar
lensman lensman is offline
Enthusiast
Near Toronto, originally from Essex, UK
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 1,035
 
Hails from Canada
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cunparis
I've done a few tests on paper and they dry so flat. I do a lot of knife painting but it's always with oils.

When you say they dry flat do you mean flat as in lifeless or as in physically flat with no body? I'm going to assume you mean the latter... I personally love using the knife (and anything else I can lay my hands on - experiment!) since I find it frees me up from being anally focused on detail. I get body in the acrylics by using extenders and/or paint straight from the tube - never use water. I very often mix my paint right on the canvas or board. It goes on nice and thick if that's what you are after. And like someone else said here, you don't have to wait long before you can paint right over it and use the texture to your advantage.



Glenn
__________________
My Gallery ... Art and Jewellery on Etsy
"The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls." - Pablo Picasso
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 09:00 AM
Enchanted Enchanted is offline
Lord of the Arts
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,646
 
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

Knife painting is as variable as is brush painting, depending on each artist's particular style and method of working. Some people like a heavy impasto look while others prefer a smoother appearance. Just as one must do when painting in oils, one must adjust the viscosity of the acrylic to make it do what you want it to do.

I personally prefer using acrylic gel for knife painting, but the thicker it goes on the longer it's going to take to dry throughout the thickness. It will still dry faster than oils in the same thickness but not as fast as it does when applied thinly with a brush.
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 10:54 AM
cunparis's Avatar
cunparis cunparis is offline
Veteran Member
Paris, France
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 936
 
Hails from United States
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

Thanks to everyone so far for the responses. I found one of the images is a bit clearer and shows more detail:one of the images. In looking at it, her technique becomes more apparent. Each layer lets a little more of the layer below show through. In the sky there is some yellow, then ultramarine + white, then on top some phthalo blue + white. I think it'd be very difficult to do this alla prima in oils.

gnu - I really like her colors. In fact when I look for artists to add to my favorites, I mainly look for bright colors. I think this is why she instantly got my attention. Her colors & subject matter remind me of the south of france.

Mark Newton - I use Rembrandt acrylics and then seem to stay open forever. When I paint impasto they don't seem to dry.

NodakerDeb - I agree with you about clean-up. I also like the expressiveness and lack of detail that one gets with a knife. And once one gets good at it, it's unbelieveable what one can do. Look at Susan Sarback's work. Absolutely incredible, and all done with a knife! Thanks for sharing your site. I enjoyed your acrylic knife painting in progress, it's coming along nicely. Will you be doing more? I also enjoy your other works. I applaud you for your ability to paint in a variety of styles, you really seem to enjoy what you do and have fun with it. It really shows.

lensman & jaxas - I think I need an acrylic gel. The golden is pretty famous but expensive here in France. How are the other brands? Talens and Liquitex are more affordable.

-Michael
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 12:49 PM
Sax87Tenor Sax87Tenor is offline
Senior Member
New York City (Staten Island)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 134
 
Hails from United States
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

I just finished doing the Van Gogh project with acrylics. I found that Liquitex High Viscosity Paints dry very quickly, and with or without a gel medium you can get some great texture or impastos. I think I'll be using the liquitex paints from now on because you can wtaer them down as well. Also, it looks like she uses a few different size knives.
__________________
"It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing." - Mark Rothko

"Every good painter paints what he is." - Jackson Pollock
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 01:23 PM
cunparis's Avatar
cunparis cunparis is offline
Veteran Member
Paris, France
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 936
 
Hails from United States
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sax87Tenor
I just finished doing the Van Gogh project with acrylics. I found that Liquitex High Viscosity Paints dry very quickly, and with or without a gel medium you can get some great texture or impastos. I think I'll be using the liquitex paints from now on because you can wtaer them down as well. Also, it looks like she uses a few different size knives.

I bought a tube of Liquitex HV to see how it compares to the Rembrandt I normally use. One thing I noticed right away was that the Rembrandt was much much thicker. The color I bought was cad yellow light, and I only used it in some mixtures so I can't say how it handled. I think I'll give it a try by itself to see if it handles better than the Rembrandt. The Rembrandt is thick but I'm coming to the conclusion that it needs gel or water to make it flow a little better. And adding water is delicate because it's so easy to add to much (like by dipping my brush in my rinsing water) and then it's way too thin. It looks to me like the Liquitex is a better consistency to start with.

-Michael
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 12-31-2004, 03:01 PM
PAKI's Avatar
PAKI PAKI is offline
Lord of the Arts
California
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,344
 
Hails from United States
Re: Knife painting & texture, how does Dorsey McHugh do it?

Michael - I share your interest in painting with a knife. I find it alluring and addicting. For some reason, I am tempted to apply thick painterly strokes more than thin ones. I am enjoying my little journey, but I know that I need those thin ones to round-me-out. Not afraid of exploring though...
Dorsey has sure pulled off a pretty good impressionistic look, (color against color to blend in the eye). In my experimenting, I think Ryan is correct, "it looks like she uses a few different size knives."
I found that I am less likely to create mud in acrylics than I do in oils. I am sure it has to do with the dry times, more than anything, I, am able to contribute. Sometimes I want more mud.... and I have to fight to get it with acrylics. I also am participating in the Van Gogh project ( http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=233609 )and I found that I had to premix my muted colors to get the look that my (Van Gogh) reference picture showed me. It was hard to create Van Gogh's look in acrylic, primarily because I could not mix enough on the surface (acrylics dried too fast), so I resorted to premixing his colors before applying. In a freer sense, I like to mix on the canvas more than the palette. I can then capture the glazing, impressionistic, translucency techniques that I love the most. The use of retarder, line thickener, gel medium, and a wet surface, gave me more freedom than just using the thicker acrylics. I do like applying with a knife, but then the variety of brushstroke thickness and look are limited. I ask myself why? Why do I need to limit myself to the knife? I agree with Gill, "with no defined edges". Mark said it perfectly, "But the knife stills plays an important role, but cant imagine doing a whole painting with it, donít see the point really...personal taste. Also I canít imagine using a knife with anything other than impasto paint.". Deb.... you have discovered a secret reason I like the knife...lol..."the best reason I can come up with for using a knife for the whole painting is EASY CLEAN UP". BTW Deb, that painting you are doing, http://www.deborahs-art.com/On%20The%20Easel.htm made me do a double take a couple of times. That work is a kind-of-trompe'. It fooled my eye more than once with the powerful perspective you have used. Like it!
I have been unsuccessful in adding water to the thicker acrylics and keep the feel and look that I want. I did discover that the use of "line thickener" helped in some cases.
I throw in my confidence for Liquitex, when it comes to texture and thickness out of the tube.
__________________
Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you. It doesn't take a very big person to carry a grudge. You cannot unsay a cruel word.
Every path has a few puddles. When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.


jerry

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:01 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.