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Old 01-10-2020, 02:38 PM
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kevinwueste kevinwueste is offline
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

some great advice here ! I suggest looking at the "Loomis Mannequin" and how he draws the head ( from a basics set of shapes like a ball and cone) and his proportional basics.. such good stuff and free/legal for download on the web ( google "Andrew Loomis downloads).. - Kevin
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Old 01-10-2020, 02:40 PM
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

Thank you for pointing that out, Pam. I've noticed with this drawing that for some reason when it comes to portraits I'm too conservative and not bold enough with my angles and diagonal lines and it ruins the likeness. I'm also still trying to figure out what makes a likeness. I've read there are two camps. One being feature shapes and their proximity to each other as found in caricatures. The other camp says it's mostly the shape of the head and details of the eyes.

Thank you for the suggestion, Randy. Not too long ago someone gave me a copy of that book but both the title and the intro sounded so questionable and off-putting to me that I set it aside. (I'm very sceptical of psychology trends). But maybe I should have to remember where I put it and take another look this time skipping the theories.
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Old 01-10-2020, 02:42 PM
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

Thank you for that suggestion, Kevin. I will check that out.
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Old 01-11-2020, 09:55 AM
Gewoontedier Gewoontedier is offline
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

An excellent way to train your eye for accuracy is the Charles Bargue drawing course. Itís a bit of a chore but it will teach you how to measure, if anything. Look into the sight-size method, too. Loomis etc. is great for constructing humans from imagination and breaking down the figure/head into basic forms, but is not exactly about getting the likeness down in portraits. There is also a course by Dorian Iten that focuses on accuracy that has some useful exercises, it can be found on gumroad. Next to these resources, one of the most important things to train your eye is simply mileage, so keep observing and drawing, and then some more!
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Old 01-11-2020, 11:40 AM
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

I don't recall "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" relying much on psychology, though I readily admit I haven't read the intro in awhile. The lessons within the book rely mainly utilizing our creative thinking processes as opposed to analytical thinking. For instance, thinking about shapes of light and dark instead what an object is. The object is accurately rendered because the placement of light and dark shapes is correct. Maybe an over-simplistic description, but the gist is I don't think think there is much reliance on being preached to about psychological theory like we might find in many self-help books. Like anything, take what you may find valuable and leave the rest. Or you may find it all not to your liking in which case that's fine too.

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Old 01-11-2020, 03:37 PM
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gewoontedier
An excellent way to train your eye for accuracy is the Charles Bargue drawing course. Itís a bit of a chore but it will teach you how to measure, if anything. Look into the sight-size method, too. Loomis etc. is great for constructing humans from imagination and breaking down the figure/head into basic forms, but is not exactly about getting the likeness down in portraits. There is also a course by Dorian Iten that focuses on accuracy that has some useful exercises, it can be found on gumroad. Next to these resources, one of the most important things to train your eye is simply mileage, so keep observing and drawing, and then some more!

Loomis - in my experience - is an excellent resource for developing the underpinnings so you can worry about "likeness ... in portraits".. likeness is quite easy - the human qualities: good proportion, perspective and value are much harder. - Kevin
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Old 01-15-2020, 01:54 AM
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

There's always lots of good advice from the experienced folk on this site.
I think your drawings are coming along nicely. Surely the most important thing is practice.
The idea that 'creative' activity is mainly concentrated on one side of the brain has long been completely discredited in neuroscience. The industry in books, courses etc. which it spawned seems to carry on unabated. This is not to say that some of the exercises described in such works are not of value, just that the theory behind them is nonsense. After all, people have successfully navigated the oceans for centuries using the idea that the stars are fixed to a big sphere!
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Old 01-15-2020, 12:16 PM
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Re: Need Help with Traditional Approaches to proportions and Likenesses

Thank you, Gewoontedier. I'll especially have to look into the Bargue course. It is the likenesses that elludes and baffles me. Recently, I saw a pop art (two toned and sort of cartoon style) painting that depicted Marylin Monroe without eyes... But it was still very obviously her. The hair outline and mole gave it away.

I'll give that book another go, Randy, as soon as I find it again. It sounds like I was too quick to put it down in the first place.

That is a very good point, 123harry, about nautical navigation. Thank you for pointing that out. 🙂

I've been still trying to get a likeness but I haven't quite succeeded and I've been quickly losing steam with each fail. My intention isn't to produce a perfect portrait but rather to capture a likeness with a Renaissance style drawing (as like da Vinci) where the head seems to be protruding from the paper. My most recent attempt is below. This time I didn't measure anything except the first angle which was the side of the face on the left side of the page as compared to the bottom of the page. I only measured that because I noticed in all my previous attempts the angle was too vertical and threw off the whole thing. It is closer to what I want but still not quite right. I adjusted brightness and contrast of the photo so the lines can be seen.

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