WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting > The Technical Forum
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-15-2019, 05:28 PM
Googlies Googlies is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 14
 
Hails from Mexico
Question Gesso/primer/ground for water soluble oils?

Hi, what kind of gesso/primer/ground would be best to use with water soluble (mixable) oils?

Thanks.

Last edited by Googlies : 04-15-2019 at 05:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-15-2019, 05:52 PM
WFMartin's Avatar
WFMartin WFMartin is online now
A WC! Legend
Glendale, Arizona
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 11,479
 
Hails from United States
Re: Gesso/primer/ground for water soluble oils?

Probably the same type of acrylic primer that is typically used for traditional oils. That would be one that exhibits a degree of "tooth", so that the oil paint can physically bond with it. My choice of acrylic primer is Grumbacher 525 Acrylic Gesso. I thin it to the consistency of cream, and I brush it on with a household sash brush.

While I have my own opinions, those who recommend the use of WMO's claim them to be "the same as traditional oil paint". Well, of course that can't be totally true, or they wouldn't be sold as "Water Miscible Oil Paints". By pure logic, there HAS to be SOME differences, doesn't there?
__________________
wfmartin. My Blog "Creative Realism"...www.williamfmartin.blogspot.com

Last edited by WFMartin : 04-15-2019 at 05:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-15-2019, 06:16 PM
Googlies Googlies is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 14
 
Hails from Mexico
Re: Gesso/primer/ground for water soluble oils?

Right, is it really OK to mix acrylic and oils like that though? Or do you have to wait for the gesso to completely dry before you apply your oils to avoid problems?

Like if I want something that I can leave a little workable for when I'm painting, what could I use?
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-15-2019, 11:07 PM
DAK723's Avatar
DAK723 DAK723 is offline
WC! Guide
Rochester, NY
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 12,467
 
Re: Gesso/primer/ground for water soluble oils?

Your ground/primer should always be completely dry before applying the paint used in your painting, whether traditional or WMO. So you are not mixing the ground (whether acrylic or oil) with your oil paints. Aside from that, I have never heard anyone mention any particular difference in what ground to use with WMOs compared to traditional oils.

If you are looking for a first layer of paint/medium to paint into as many painters do (as in the Wet on Wet TV painter method) than using a water thinned layer of WMO paint works just fine.

Don
__________________
Don Ketchek, WC Guide - Pastels

My Blog My Art Gallery My Photo Gallery
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-16-2019, 07:36 AM
Gigalot's Avatar
Gigalot Gigalot is online now
A Local Legend
Tbilisi, Georgia
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9,367
 
Hails from Georgia
Re: Gesso/primer/ground for water soluble oils?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DAK723
I have never heard anyone mention any particular difference in what ground to use with WMOs compared to traditional oils.
The problem comes with |WMO varnishing. Because of high surfactant content, WMO can attaract moisture and affects several kind of picture varnishes, making them milky and poor looking surface.
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:20 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.