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Old 11-08-2013, 06:45 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Hyperrealism

I have been fascinated by works done using graphite to render hyperrealism, especially on portraits, and I wonder if anyone knows any tutorials on line, or books, or DVD, etc. I would like to explore this technique.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:22 AM
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Re: Hyperrealism

Hi, Moe..I am not sure....you could check if there are any books from Armin Merssman, Mark Montana, Paul Lund, I can´t remember of any more hyperrealistic artist in graphite right now...

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Old 11-08-2013, 09:28 AM
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Re: Hyperrealism

Hi Moises, I'm afraid i can't help you out with online tutorials but there must be some about if you do a google search.
You might like to have a peak at a few drawings i have done along these lines. I don't do much drawing but the few i have done are what you might call realistic and most are rendered in pencil. Also i'm self taught so if your just starting out in drawing. don't worry practice makes perfect.
Anyway heres 2 links for you.

http://cfcarr.wordpress.com/

This is a video of one of my drawings done in stages
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Py7TsiYcD-Q

Anyway i hope i might have helped in some way, even to pick up a pencil and go for it : }
Christian
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:43 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Hyperrealism

Luicre: Thank you for the information. I think Montana did a thread on Wetcanvas about it.
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:32 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Hyperrealism

Christian: Thank you for the information. I got very impressed with your work and I have few questions about the technique of hyperrealism:
1) While looking at Google I noticed that a good number of artists draw on large canvases. I saw your work and you did not use large canvas, therefore, it is possible to render hyperrealistic work on a smaller canvases. Wright?
2) did you do your work solely by using graphite? Did you use Charcoal pencils? Do you start the drawings with hard graphites? Do you blend your tones?
3) What kind of paper did you use?
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Old 11-08-2013, 11:15 AM
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Re: Hyperrealism

JD Hillberry has a book out mostly for textures but his work is realistic. Mike Sibley also has a book out though his focus is primarily animal portraits and landscapes. JD mixes charcoal and graphite while Mike prefers graphite. I consider both books to be required reading. Matti Kataja published an excellent book on hyper-realism a few years ago - you would have to contact him about purchasing a copy though.

Lu is referring to Mark Montana. I haven't heard from him in quite some time but his work is archived here. Armin Mersmann is one of the best realists out there but he hasn't got any tutorials of which I am aware - though his work is definitely worth viewing. Also Paul Lung is the best of the cat artists out there - IMO.

I don't know if this would be of any use ... it's a video I posted on youtube but I'd only been drawing for 2 years so the skill level is low (they're all 9x12 though)... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Dn1RdjR7Rc
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Last edited by SparrowHawk7 : 11-08-2013 at 11:29 AM.
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Old 11-08-2013, 11:37 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Hyperrealism

Ken:
Thank you for the information. Yes, I believe JD said to me, if I am not mistaken, that his classes for this technique are given in Colorado. He gave a workshop in Texas early this year, and I learned a lot especially using both the graphite and charcoal pencil. I am thinking to take his course in Colorado, but I am not ready yet so I need to get more acquainted with this technique first. I already have his book.
I have seen the work of the people that you mentioned but there is no tutorial or books or DVD's. It has to be a trick, or the clever use of the papers or graphite to render the minute details that characterizes this technique. I think JD uses the texture of the paper, and the hard surface of the desk to render the realistic appearance of his work on still life.
I would like to experiment with this technique, although appears to be demanding and tedious.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:49 PM
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Re: Hyperrealism

I think a lot of JD's method involves blending with various materials as well. Felt gives a different texture than chamois for instance.

One thing I do see (and have experienced myself) is that realism is much easier on larger surfaces. When I started I began with 8x10 but found that size was a bit too limiting because I learned to see better and it didn't take long before I was seeing more than I could duplicate on the paper. Working a bit larger was helpful so I moved to 9x12 for awhile. These days I find I work even a bit larger - at least with portraits. The last one I did was around 12x15 I think it was which I felt about as large as I would want to go.

A lot of the realism in skin comes from circulism in the application. It was developed initially for CP but it works wonderfully with graphite as well. I tend to move my wrist in circular/elliptical patterns while pressing very lightly. Then I will move my arm which tends to leave a certain track which remains visible to a small degree. The combination tends to leave a lot of realistic texture. Seems to me I first learned that from Armin though I don't remember exactly. I've shown this image often here but it's about 2 x 2 roughly on Stonehenge I believe and highly layered. Most of the skin texture just happened due to the application method. Some of the directionality and detail was intentional, of course, but a great deal just appeared. None of it was done with a sharp tip.

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Old 11-08-2013, 02:07 PM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Hyperrealism

Great work Ken!
In other words, you start with circles (I saw a video another artist uses ovals!) with a hard graphite, and then you apply another layer with a softer graphite. Is that your technique?
Another question: Do you think that a portrait the size of your open hand(around 8 inches) could achieve a hyperrealist result?
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:57 PM
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Re: Hyperrealism

Hi Moe. Yes, ovals, ellipses or circles - all the same thing. It does take some practice to get it, but it works. I start with 6H (underhand with the side of the pencil) and go along till no more value gets transferred. NO pressure - just let the weight of the pencil be sufficient. Then I go to 4H and do the same thing. Then 2H - same thing again. If I need darker yet I'll go to H - but with a writing grip - now using the tip of the pencil. Again - no pressure and very very light touch. Same circular/elliptical motion though. The more layers are down the slower the progress because graphite is a dry lubricant so it's slippery by nature. That's also why putting charcoal on top of it doesn't work well. If I need darker yet I'll go to HB, then 2B then 4B - all with writing grip, a dull "point" and very little pressure. You can get some pretty impressive coverage this way. Keep in mine that I only work in small areas at a time and pretty much finish them before moving to another area.

As for the size, I think the scale depends more than anything else. A full body at 8x10 is going to be really hard to get with high realism. But Armin does a fair amount of eyes at that size - but just the eye and surrounding tissue.



You can see the skin texture in the closeup which came mostly from the circulism application. Some of it was, of course, intentionally done, but the small fissures and tiny cracks just happen depending on the paper. The one above was on Bristol Smooth Series 300 (9x12)

Different paper gives different results, but there are still textures created. The following was done on mellotex (13x15). Much smoother, but still a realistic texture I think.

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Old 11-08-2013, 06:43 PM
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Re: Hyperrealism

Hi moises i'm glad you like my drawings. Im afraid i haven't got many to my name after so many years lol.
Yes you can be realistic in smaller sizes but i'd say it gets harder if you start going to small as the details will all blend in to one another, you need the human eye to pick up small differences for it to be realistic.
I tend to use only 2-3 pencils in my drawings they are a carbon pencil and a 8H graphite and mabye another one around hb-2h.
As other people have said different materials blend the graphite differently so some experimentation is called for here to see what you like or what you get on with.
As for the paper i like to use a smoothish surface most of the time, that is very white. This is however just personal choice after years of finding what i like.
Basicly people can give advice and help but the only real way to find this out is to give it a go. it would be nice if you could follow this thread up with a drawing in the future.
Christian
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:04 PM
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Re: Hyperrealism

Oh, I forgot about Dirk Dzimirzky, the german artist, he has done some amazing works with charcoal on canvas also with graphite, pastels and oils, and he also has some threads here. But he runs workshops at his place, I have not seen anything related to a book or a DVD.
http://www.dzimirsky.com/


One thing that I remember from the few hyperrealistic artists that I know of is that they work bigger than real life. Bigger.


Mark Montana said once that he takes a lot of photographs from his subject.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=498954

This thread from Mr. Montana could be of help:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=499251

Hope that helps!

Saludos

Luicre
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Old 11-09-2013, 06:42 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Hyperrealism

Ken: Great job on this work using the circles, especially the one with the beard. It fooled me, since I thought it was a photograph! I will try using your technique and I will use the watercolor paper that JD recommends which gives you endurance and takes both graphite and charcoal.
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Old 11-09-2013, 07:20 AM
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Re: Hyperrealism

Please note that my explanation was for skin only ... not hair or fur. That technique is altogether different an has nothing to do with circulism. That only woks for skin.
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Old 11-09-2013, 07:38 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Hyperrealism

Christian: Thank you again, and I will try to do a realistic drawing soon, so I need to find a good subject to start with. I am doing a series of scientits for the last year and a half.
Luicre: Thank you very much for the information. I learned in the past that this german artist only gives workshop in Europe, mainly in Germany, and he has no time to give Internet tutorials or DVD's since he is too busy doing his work. He is a real master in hyperrealism.
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Last edited by Moises Menendez : 11-09-2013 at 08:27 AM.
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