WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-01-2013, 10:55 AM
Stew Crowther's Avatar
Stew Crowther Stew Crowther is offline
Member
Portland, Dorset, England
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 74
 
Hails from England
Underpainting

Hello Everyone,
Sorry I know this must have been asked a thousand times before.
Usually when I start an oil painting I first do an underpainting with roughly the same colours the end painting will have.
I would like to try a portrait with a monotone underpainting but have a few questions.
Do some people glaze over the underpainting using a flat colour using the underpainting for value?
What would be a good colour to use? Black & white, greens, browns...? I have seen Grunge (Theresa) using purples with amazing results – I believe she doesn't glaze but uses the underpainting as a kind of value map. Does this mean in theory, you could use any colour for a monotone underpainting?
I was also wondering what people thought of using walnut oil as a medium. I have been using Liquin (fine detail) but would like something that flows more and stays open a little longer. I was thinking 50/50 with W&N Sansodor or Zest-it? Would I need to increase the amount of oil for each layer if I glazed or would I be ok using 50/50 for each layer.
I guess I shouldn't ask what colours or oil paint people use eh?
Thanks for any help.
__________________
Stew Crowther.
stewcrowther.wordpress.com
www.stewcrowther.weebly.com
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-02-2013, 01:30 AM
Stew Crowther's Avatar
Stew Crowther Stew Crowther is offline
Member
Portland, Dorset, England
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 74
 
Hails from England
Re: Underpainting

I have also been wondering about the couch method.
__________________
Stew Crowther.
stewcrowther.wordpress.com
www.stewcrowther.weebly.com
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-02-2013, 05:17 PM
sidbledsoe sidbledsoe is offline
WC! Guide
Maryland, USA
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 11,906
 
Hails from United States
Re: Underpainting

well I decided to offer some of my opinions after seeing 200 views and no responses! (the responses may ramp up now )


Quote:
Do some people glaze over the underpainting using a flat colour using the underpainting for value?
Yes, some do that.

Quote:
What would be a good colour to use? Black & white, greens, browns...?
Yes, those are all good.

Quote:
I have seen Grunge (Theresa) using purples with amazing results – I believe she doesn't glaze but uses the underpainting as a kind of value map. Does this mean in theory, you could use any colour for a monotone underpainting?
I have literally seen nearly all colors work well for different artists.

Quote:
I was also wondering what people thought of using walnut oil as a medium. I have been using Liquin (fine detail) but would like something that flows more and stays open a little longer. I was thinking 50/50 with W&N Sansodor or Zest-it? Would I need to increase the amount of oil for each layer if I glazed or would I be ok using 50/50 for each layer.
Walnut oil is fine to use. You can use the same medium throughout the painting.

Quote:
I guess I shouldn't ask what colours or oil paint people use eh?
nope, that is like feeding the animals at the zoo!
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-02-2013, 06:06 PM
llawrence llawrence is offline
Lord of the Arts
East of Eden
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,802
 
Re: Underpainting

Currently I am using brown ochre and lead white for underpainting a portrait. After that dries, a couch of more transparent earths - siennas and umbers - into which I paint the lights opaquely. I do what I can to leave the shadows transparent to the underpainting. Just one way.
__________________
My website: http://www.rusticportraits.com
My artwork blog: http://llawrencebispo.wordpress.com
My art materials blog: http://sunsikell.wordpress.com
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-02-2013, 10:21 PM
Ron Francis's Avatar
Ron Francis Ron Francis is online now
Lord of the Arts
Tasmania Australia
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,739
 
Hails from Australia
Re: Underpainting

I generally don't glaze, but I have seen a method used for realistic results.
First layer is done for values, usually brown or dark green.
Once the values are established, it is over painted opaquely in grey (grisaille) that looks similar to a black and white photo.
Colours are then added in glazes.
But of course, any technique is valid if it produces the results you're after.

One note though, even the most transparent colours are opaque to some degree and this means that they can alter your values in ways you may not want.
For example, if you glaze yellow over a black and white image it will lighten the dark areas rather than darken them (as it should if the paint was truly subtractive).
I'm not sure how artists compensate for this, but I would probably mix a dark yellow to glaze over the darker areas. I'm out of depth in that area.

Bill Martin is possibly the best person to give you advice about glazing, so maybe he will see this thread.
__________________
Ron
www.RonaldFrancis.com
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-03-2013, 12:23 AM
WFMartin's Avatar
WFMartin WFMartin is online now
A Local Legend
Glendale, Arizona
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 8,148
 
Hails from United States
Re: Underpainting

I use this grisaille underpainting, followed by multiple, thin, glaze layers of color routinely for still lifes, and flower paintings.

Following is the mix for my "dark" for the grisaille: Equal parts Ivory Black, and Raw Umber. Then, into that mix I add Chromium Oxide Green, until it has created a bit of a cloudy appearance, as well as being a bit greener, of course--and a tad lighter.

In use, this creates rather a "moonglow" appearance when mixed with white for the many values required in the subject, and it works very well as an underpainting.

Avoiding alkyd materials in my paintings, my glazing medium consists of traditional materials, and is as follows: 1 part Linseed Oil, 1 part Walnut Oil, 1 part Venice Turpentine, and 2 parts Oil Of Spike Lavender.

Linseed Oil is the faster drying oil.
Walnut Oil is slippery, and is the slower drying oil.
Venice Turpentine is NOT a liquid/solvent, as its name might imply--it is a resin or a "balsam" to be more precise--the sap of a Larch Tree. It is as thick as chewing gum.
Oil Of Spike is the solvent in this recipe, and it has the following characteristics: it is slow drying. It is slippery in its action. It is more aggressive a solvent than Turpentine, and it is MUCH more aggressive than Odorless Mineral Spirits. It is low in toxicity. It smells very good, and it costs a bunch!

This medium will remain open (wet/useable) on my palette for an entire day, without tacking up, or becoming gummy, or draggy on the brush. Yet, once applied to the canvas, it usually dries within a day or two.

To use this medium, I apply it to only the area upon which I intend to work, and I literally massage it in using my fingertip, or a small, cosmetic sponge. There should be no runs, drips, or high-gloss areas. Once applied very thinly, it should exhibit a slight sheen compared to the surrounding, untouched areas, when glancing a light across the surface.

Then, using full-bodied, undiluted paint, I apply paint right into this couch of medium while it is still wet, using the applied medium as a lubricant for the paint, rather than as a "thinner" or a "diluent" for the paint.

The following is a recent painting that I did in this manner. I painted it on a nice, test, Raymar panel that is an oil-primed Claessens Linen panel. Effective glazing is not the diluting of paint with volumes of clear medium; instead, it is the use of minimal amounts of medium, and spreading (scrubbing) the paint out, into a very thin layer. I use my underpainting as a value map, putting light glaze where it is indicated, and darker glazes where they are located on the grisaille underpainting.



When someone tells me that the grisaille underpainting looks good enough to frame, I figure that it is good enough to begin glazing color onto it.

Here is the final painting:

"Gem Of The Garden"...11" x 14" oil on Oil-primed Linen, RayMar Panel

Hope that gives you some ideas, and may have helped you in your quest for doing this method effectively. I use traditional materials throughout the process.
__________________
wfmartin. My Blog "Creative Realism"...www.williamfmartin.blogspot.com
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-03-2013, 11:03 AM
Stew Crowther's Avatar
Stew Crowther Stew Crowther is offline
Member
Portland, Dorset, England
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 74
 
Hails from England
Re: Underpainting

Sid - Thanks for the ramp
Your post certainly got things moving.
__________________
Stew Crowther.
stewcrowther.wordpress.com
www.stewcrowther.weebly.com

Last edited by Stew Crowther : 02-03-2013 at 11:10 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 02-03-2013, 11:09 AM
Stew Crowther's Avatar
Stew Crowther Stew Crowther is offline
Member
Portland, Dorset, England
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 74
 
Hails from England
Re: Underpainting

Thank you for the great advice Sid, Lawrence, Ron and Bill. You have all helped a great deal.
I have loads to think about now.
__________________
Stew Crowther.
stewcrowther.wordpress.com
www.stewcrowther.weebly.com
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:34 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.