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  #31   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-06-2007, 03:23 PM
juliet8 juliet8 is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

For image transferring on any surface photocopyies are the best, but since I don't have ready access to one, (or does anyone for that matter?) My laserjet printer works great, (its a HP laserjet 4p). The ink doesn't smear once water or mat medium(glue) is put on the image. Mat medium, watered down elmers glue also works, or what I've been using is "mod podge" glue. I've tried other methods of transfering images, usually with chemicals and then rubbing the image. But it ends up making your studiospace smell something awful and thats not good especially if you live there too. This is an example of using the mod podge or watered down glue.
http://docs.google.com/FilePage?id=dcf87kc4_11hdwchhf9

Last edited by juliet8 : 09-06-2007 at 03:32 PM.
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Old 09-07-2007, 11:28 PM
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

I've mentioned this before, but what the heck? It works. Moisten or clean the surface to be transferred ON TO with baby wipes or hand wipes. While the surface is still moist place the photocopy face down and burnish the back. Don't moisten the copy. It works for both laser and inkjet copies but one is more successful than the other. I'll have to check which is which. It's easy. It's readily available and your studio will smell like a baby.
Carol
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Old 08-03-2008, 09:41 AM
mlogusz mlogusz is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Transfering Photocopy to Linoleum Block
  • Prepare image on computer.
  • You may want to consider bumping up the contrast and brightness of the image now. Also converting image to greyscale may help too.
  • Print it out backwards using 'mirror image' or 'reverse print' or 'flip horizontal' under advanced settings. If your printer doesn't have these settings then in your Photo-program (like PhotoShop) click image / flip horizontal before printing so your image/text is backwards on screen (and thus on your printout and photocopy).
  • Depending on your type of printer ink/toner sometimes transfers won't work so make a photocopy on a real photocopier.
  • Place photocopy face-down onto block.
  • Moisten back with ACETONE.
  • Let dry (will dry in mere seconds).
  • Peel back.
It must be Acetone (not mineral spirits, laquers, rubbing alcohol, lamp oil, paint thinner, etc.--I forgot which to use and tried them all until I opened the acetone). Acetone may be purchased for about $20/gallon in a hardware store, but cheaper and smaller containers are available at art suppliers. A gallon would probably last a life-time.

Depending on your computer printer you might need an actual photocopy first. Ink-jet based printers don't seem to work, you'll need a toner based printer (or just photocopy your backward printout). Also be careful, you'll want to use a toner-based photocopier as well (a 'real' photocopier, not just an ink-based printer/scanner/fax machine some places have...though if it's toner based those should work too). Some people's 'laserjet' printers will transfer as well. Liquid Ink cartridges=bad, Expensive Dusty Toner carts=good.

The paper may 'stick' to the linoleum block, so if the image permits you may want to dog-ear a corner or have a knife around to help peel it up. Remember, if you don't like how it transfer (crooked, etc.) just wipe the block clean with more acetone and try again.

Also: If you have nail polish remover around, check the ingredients--it may be mostly acetone.

Someone posted a YouTube video of the process, just search for 'acetone transfer'.

Cheers,
mlogusz

Last edited by mlogusz : 08-03-2008 at 09:58 AM.
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Old 08-03-2008, 11:08 AM
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Deesart Deesart is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

My friend demonstrated a nifty gum arabic transfer method based on the same oil vs water principle as lithography. Using a fresh xereox photocopy (must be a fresh copy so chemicals are still active), heavily dampen the photocopy with water, then wipe on a solution of gum arabic & water (she just poured a tablespoon or so in a small bowl of water). Then brayer or roll on etching ink (which will adhere to the photocopy ink and be repelled by the blank water soaked areas of the paper). She laid the inked photocopy on a plexiglass plate with print paper on top and ran through the press. It produced a decent reverse print. Additionally she would immediately use the new print as a plate and run through the press again to get another ghost which would be back to the original orientation of the image.

Maybe this could be adapted to transfer to linoleum? It does get a bit messy. LOL

Dee

Forgot to add, this works best with line drawings than won't fill in too much.

Last edited by Deesart : 08-03-2008 at 11:13 AM.
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Old 08-03-2008, 11:35 AM
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inugie inugie is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

I have used laquer thinners on a photocopy to transfer to lino with very good results, but beware of the toxic fumes - you may end up too 'high' to do any cutting safely for a while.

Lately (and as I am pregnant) I've been copying/drawing the image on transfer paper with chinagraph (oilbased, glass writing) pencils of different colours, and than transfer this to the lino from the back with a 3H pencil. This works well although you do lose some detail if you have a complicated design because of all the repeated drawing.

Great for reduction prints as the pencil marks stay on the lino even after repeated cleaning, and you can use different colors as required.

Annamie
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Old 08-03-2008, 11:44 AM
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Since acetone was brought up again, just a quick reminder that if you don't have an art supply store or hardware store near; but have a drug or grocery store handy look for acetone based fingernail polish remover. You'll be able to get a small quantity to test the transfer process.
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Old 08-03-2008, 03:08 PM
mlogusz mlogusz is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlogusz
Transfering Photocopy to Linoleum Block
  • Prepare image on computer.
  • You may want to consider bumping up the contrast and brightness of the image now. Also converting image to greyscale may help too.
  • Print it out backwards using 'mirror image' or 'reverse print' or 'flip horizontal' under advanced settings. If your printer doesn't have these settings then in your Photo-program (like PhotoShop) click image / flip horizontal before printing so your image/text is backwards on screen (and thus on your printout and photocopy).
  • Depending on your type of printer ink/toner sometimes transfers won't work so make a photocopy on a real photocopier.
  • Place photocopy face-down onto block.
  • Moisten back with ACETONE.
  • Let dry (will dry in mere seconds).
  • Peel back.
It must be Acetone (not mineral spirits, laquers, rubbing alcohol, lamp oil, paint thinner, etc.--I forgot which to use and tried them all until I opened the acetone). Acetone may be purchased for about $20/gallon in a hardware store, but cheaper and smaller containers are available at art suppliers. A gallon would probably last a life-time.

Depending on your computer printer you might need an actual photocopy first. Ink-jet based printers don't seem to work, you'll need a toner based printer (or just photocopy your backward printout). Also be careful, you'll want to use a toner-based photocopier as well (a 'real' photocopier, not just an ink-based printer/scanner/fax machine some places have...though if it's toner based those should work too). Some people's 'laserjet' printers will transfer as well. Liquid Ink cartridges=bad, Expensive Dusty Toner carts=good.

The paper may 'stick' to the linoleum block, so if the image permits you may want to dog-ear a corner or have a knife around to help peel it up. Remember, if you don't like how it transfer (crooked, etc.) just wipe the block clean with more acetone and try again.

Also: If you have nail polish remover around, check the ingredients--it may be mostly acetone.

Someone posted a YouTube video of the process, just search for 'acetone transfer'.

Cheers,
mlogusz
One little change: I was thinking of a different process...so you do NOT want a mirror/reversed printout or photocopy. The photocopy should be normal, when it transfers to the linoleum block it will be reversed...then when you print the block it will print properly. Guess I was a bit loopy on acetone fumes
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Old 08-03-2008, 05:35 PM
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sumabokemo sumabokemo is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Have you tried paper plate lithography? I just was experimenting with it and I think it's going to work, but I'm having a problem with my little home laser printer--the toner lifts off when I ink it up. The way I've approached it is to put a very thin layer of gesso on the lino plate to give it a little grip and then printed my laser photo onto the paper. In the areas of my image that took (that hadn't lifted off) it looks great.
I was thinking that after cutting the plate, I would remove the gesso with a little alchohol and/or sandpaper. What do you think?
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Old 08-04-2008, 11:08 AM
charlesgmorgan charlesgmorgan is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Xylene and lacquer thinner are both extremely toxic ... just go on-line and check the msds information for xylene and lacquer thinner. Part of the problem is that every manufacturer of lacquer thinner uses a slightly different mixture of mostly toxic stuff ... all very bad for you.

Acetone works very well ... available in most paint stores. It is much, much less toxic than the xylene or lacquer thinner. It is not carcinogenic, nor is it a neuro-toxin. It is highly volatile and flammable, so take the usual precautions. Put your xerox or laser print face down on the surface you want to transfer to ... use a cotton ball soaked in acetone, and rub the back of the paper. Let it sit for a minute and take the paper away.

Citrus based cleaners ... based on d-limonene ... also work with many xerox and laser printers. I used to use it for all my transfers. But my new laser printer uses a toner that the citrus based stuff does not touch. But I never found anything that acetone does not transfer. D-limonene is safer than most anything else you can use.

Work safely. Avoid skin exposure ... avoid inhalation ... be very careful with flammables.

Cheers ...... Charles
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Old 08-04-2008, 11:11 PM
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MezzoBug MezzoBug is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

I also tried lazer tran, and used both methods. With no success.

How about just DIRECT printing to the plate...

So what I am going to try is something you can find on google by searching under "ink jet PCB direct printing".

It involves modyfing an ink jet printer to print directly onto a substrate up a to a few mm thinck.

The modifications involve:
Ensuring the 'paper' has a flat travel path.
Rejigging some of the sensors.
Raising the inkjet print head up so it does not contact and merely whizzes past spraying ink down as it goes.

For etching some brands of yellow ink can act as an acid resist when baked in the oven first. Amazing.

This would seem to offer some very exciting possibilities...

I could imagine scanning hand drawings into the computer and using the fill funtion in a drawing programme to create intricate masking out areas of solid ink for use in aquatinting.

And it should be possible to print out as a intaglio line etch mask or a more blocky aquatint mask, rosin in the normal way, etch, then clean the plate off, and put the plate through the modified printer for a second, perfectly aligned second masking out and do a second ....or third or 20th aquatint layer.

Or this lends itself to creating multi plate colour with perfect alignment.
I'll post to the group if I get printer the modifications done !


Search on google under CD direct printing as I think some people use the CD printing part of some printers to do this without having to modify their printers...
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Old 08-10-2008, 11:05 PM
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LetterC LetterC is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Honestly this is the method I use. Baby Wipes. Moisten the surface to be transfered ONTO with a Baby Wipe (Hand Wipe if you prefer). Lay the photocopy face down onto the moist surface and burnish the back of the photocopy. I lift the corner to check if it is transferring, while keeping it in place incase it isn't. It works for me. It's easy and I'm assuming it's non-toxic. :-)
Carol
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Old 08-14-2008, 10:56 PM
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

For woodcuts, I use rice paste (1.5 Tbsp rice flour to 1 Cup of water and bring to a boil). I apply a layer of the paste to the block and then wet the paper and apply it (face up, so the image needs to be reversed) and then brush the paper down with more rice paste. Let it dry and then carve right through the paper. I believe that 19th century Japanese printmakers glued
the image down face down and then dampened the paper and carefully
rubbed most of it off, leaving a translucent layer with the image. Using
that technique, you would not reverse the image.

I have not tried this with lino.

Dean
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Old 08-15-2008, 12:17 AM
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Chloe_1 Chloe_1 is offline
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

I've printed my photo... Traced it on tracing paper.. Put face down on linoleum, then trace again with a pencil. Works well!
I like the idea of placing print down on linoleum..and using a sponge to wet it..then remove. I will try it out.
Thanks all
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Old 11-02-2008, 11:05 AM
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

Thank you for the tip, just what I was looking for!
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Old 11-02-2008, 11:07 AM
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Re: How to transfer photocopy to wood? to Linoleum?

That was thanks to mlogusz, Cheers
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