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Old 06-11-2003, 09:42 AM
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palob palob is offline
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Question White spots after drying

Hi, I have started to paint one month ago. I use quite cheap oil paints. Because I do not have any idea what medium or oil to use and for what (reason, consequences), I am using only turpentine.

Everything is fine right after painting but after 1-2 days white spots manifest on some places - mostly on places where two colors meet with sharp edges, but sometimes also inside one-color area. I am not sure if it is caused by bubbles or paint shrinks during drying process. I would be very grateful if someone pointed out what is going on and how I can prevent this.

Here is one example:


Thanks a lot for every response, but I would prefer different kind of responses like "Buy more expensive paints", if it was possible

Pavol
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Old 06-11-2003, 12:58 PM
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HRobinson HRobinson is offline
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Without seeing it...

... my best guess would be that you're not getting enough pigment into those areas. Getting back to your palette more often may solve that problem. -Harry
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Old 06-11-2003, 01:23 PM
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Hi palob, welcome to Wetcanvas! and the Oils forum

Ok, you asked for it: Buy more expensive oils..........LOL JK

No really, I think you may be using too much turps. What brands are you using? Can't warrant telling you the above if we don't know really "how cheap" those paints are. But anyway, turps are mainly used for thinning the oils down for washes, or for cleaning purposes, or for mixtures with other mediums to produce a whole new medium. You can paint straight from the tube, or add a little oil, but using too much turps will cause this problem.

Hope that helps and I didn't confuse you.

Welcome once again,

Tina
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Old 06-12-2003, 03:28 AM
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palob palob is offline
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Hi, thanks for welcoming me here and for advices. Those were what I have suspected - too much turps. Often I am not able to paint straight from tube and if I make some mix I like to use it to last bit and this is possible only thanks to thinning LOL.

I am quite confused with many kinds of oils and mediums for thinning, with their different properties. This was my main reason to stay with turpentine till now. But it is going to change...

In regards to used paints. Here in Slovakia, the most affordable paints are Koh-I-Noor made by Czech company. My next paints will be Umton (also Czech, but much better). Any real brands are expensive here (mostly because of exchange rates of money) - maybe not for people making money with painting, but for us painting for fun they are.

Pavol
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Old 06-12-2003, 05:06 AM
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White spots after drying

Something not mentioned that can cause white spots on your painting, is an oil painting phenomenon called "blooming" or ghost images.

This is caused when there is too much moisture in the air as the painting dries. This can happen with both oil paints and varnishes.

You can find out more about this by looking it up on the web.
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Old 06-12-2003, 05:22 AM
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Thanks artzyone2u, I will check what is blooming. I am surprised something like this exists.
It is good to know about it a little, but it should not be a problem now, because it is very hot and dry these days here.

Pavol
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Old 06-12-2003, 12:09 PM
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Also...

... What types of vegetable based oils are available to you? Try a 50/50 mixture of what's easily available and turpentine. You can lessen the oil percentage to lessen the drying time. Common types of oil used are : Linseed, Safflower and nut oils but I would use motor oil if I had to. Just no animal fats as your work would "stink" without anyone ever seeing it. -Harry
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Old 06-12-2003, 12:20 PM
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These spots look to me like the canvas showing through. Maybe when you first paint and the paint is wet you do not notice that you have not covered all the canvas.
It will help if you mix a few drops of Linseed oil into your dipper of (I assume you are using pure Turpentine not substitute) Turpentine. One other point is that it is not always necessary to use a medium at all...only if you feel the brush is dragging or it is not coveriing well.
If you do buy some Linseed oil try painting a few drops of pure oil onto the spots if it is blooming it will disapear...although bloom is more of a grey haze over the surface than spots.

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Old 06-13-2003, 03:41 AM
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Thanks a lot for more responses. I bought Safflower oil yesterday. I was considering also Linseed and Poppyseed but picked Safflower because shop assistant could not give me any practical advices apart from brochure explanation. I will check it soon.

Gina, yes those spots are canvas showing through, but I am pretty sure, most of them were not there in the beginning (of course I do not guarantee it for all of them ).

Thanks again folks,
Pavol
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Old 06-13-2003, 12:04 PM
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white spots

I recently painted an impasto landscape. While it was wet, I didn't notice any white spots, due to the reflective sheen of the wet oil paint. There were alot of little reflective areas,throughout the painting. However, after the painting dried somewhat, and the sheen diminished, there were little spots not covered with paint throughout the canvas. I simply used a very small round brush, and place tiny dabs of paint into these "holes". Normally, I tint my canvases, but with this painting I didn't tint. Tinting the canvas via tinted gesso, has helped me to avoid seeing these little spots, on alot of my paintings. I recently went to see the Van Gogh "Wheatfields" exhibit at the Toledo Museum of Art. I had the opportunity to closely observe these paintings, and found what appeared to me to be many of these little uncovered "white spots" throughout most of the canvases. One of them was almost shocking to me, as it appeared to have many areas of the canvas, with no paint on it. It almost looked as though Van Gogh was careless. I remembered a quote, by Van Gogh after someonehad accused him of painting too hastily. He responded by saying that (not a direct quote) if they thought that he painted too hastily, then they has in effect looked at the painting too hastily. It made more sense, to me, but I still feel uncomfortable about areas of a painting where canvas is showing through. I have never observed these areas on the Monets, or Degas but have also seen these uncovered spots on paintings by Cezanne, and Pissaro. I like all of these artists works, however, white spots and all. I buy paints with linseed oil, as I have found that the ones with safflower seed oil dry slower for me. I also like the smell of linseed oil better. It's a matter of preferance. The white colours that I buy all have safflower seed oil as a vehicle, because it doesn't yellow as it dries, as can happen with linseed oil. This is not much of a problem with other colored paints, because the yellowing is miniscule, but more noticeable with whites.

Jim

Last edited by Termini. : 06-13-2003 at 12:10 PM.
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