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  #31   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-02-2012, 03:31 PM
dustonpaper dustonpaper is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

Hi Crafor ... good to see you keep on practising . Also a good idea to do still lifes, one can learn so much with them (need to do them myself now more).

You might be interested in checking out the Sovek exercises. A friend suggested them to me at the weekend and though they might not look very impressive by their own, I suppose one can learn a lot by doing these.

There is a thread here at wetcanvas about it:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=146668

Much more if you google "Sovek Exercise" or something.

Here is his website:
http://www.sovek.com/view/basics/index.htm

I think I might try some of them these days. I'm too lazy to follow all of them from start to finish, but there is a lot to learn from.

For the lighting you might try a still life box, something like this:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2514/127/
(You might already have seen it).

I have no experience in still life myself, but suppose these boxes make a nice lighting better possible.

Keep on doing your practice ! I think you do a lot of good for yourself. I really like that you learn to paint from life (no matter if a person or a still life) instead just copy photos.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:54 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

#19 & 20 Oil on fredrix canvas paper, 6x9"
Dust, thanks for the links. The first two photos are the setups, the third, the exercise. I don't know if I did either according to the instrucvtions, but that was my goal. I didn't "push the paint to the edges", I sort of dragged it along. I kind of think I sort of drew it with my brush, though not like with a pencil. I did start with a line to mark the center of each, and started out pushing out, but realized the edges would be jaggy. Maybe that's a point. I'll see if the book is in our library system. The second one, I think I did understand the directions better. This is a new experience. I do not know yet what I learned with it.




Sorry this is on an angle. There was too much glare the other way. The shapes in the first are more correct, I like the sizes of the ones in the second. I took more time with 2. Learning to see the sillouettes will be helpful, I think.
Thanks for looking. C&C welcome.
Crafor
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Old 04-07-2012, 05:52 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

#21, oil on gessoed cardboard, 6x7", plein aire, and limited palette
I am waiting for a library copy of Sovek's book, and just got a copy of "Fill Your Oil Paintings with Light & Color" by Kevin MacPherson, who talks of "starts". I've decided to work on those exercises, too. No wonder my work seems sporadic, doing a little here, a little there, along with daily living...
There's just so much I want to learn. Maybe rather than trying to find something different to paint each day, these exercises can help with this 100 too, at times. I don't want to make this just about exercises, but that is also the purpose in the first place--daily painting and learning.
Anyway, here's my first START. My second ever PLIEN AIRE, (the orange tree--# 3 in this thread was the first). It is one view to the north of my house. One goal in starts is to learn to block in the masses, to make the beginnings of the work correctly, so the rest has a better chance at turning out as one would want.
From the thread at http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show...ighlight=sovek
"Pledge to do 100 starts--simple, flat shape studies with no detail. They can be figure studies, still lifes, or landscapes. Give yourself 30 minutes to cover a canvas with properly related color shapes; this will exercise your speed skills. Strive for more accurate relationships with each one. The more starts you do, the better you'll become at them. Number your starts to chart your progress."

This is my first "start". I used a limited palette of cyan, magenta, and yellow, plus white. I did get a variety of greens, but failed at browns, for the trunks and branches. The roof should be more gray, and getting it to that color was a struggle. I had ivory black, but chose to not use it today. The sky was not that blue.
I stood at an easel, which I have not been doing for the portraits.
I consciously considered how I was using the brush, and made conscious choices as to the brush. They were stiff bristles of 3 sizes
I worked at holding them at the back end, rather than the middle, or like a pencil. I stood a bit away from the ease
I leaned I have to learn a lot more brush control holding like that. Maybe it's partly due to the small size.
I will be learning a bit about color and mixing.
I learned that quick studies--1/2 hour or so with paint-- can be very helpful.


It looks better on the computer. There's more detail that what he calls for. I need to put more paint on the background, the cardboard is showing through.
C&C welcome. Thanks for looking.
Crafor
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Old 04-08-2012, 04:09 PM
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Re: Crafor's 100

Your work is looking good, I can see progress, keep it up!

Re: browns, do what I do, just keep mixing until everything on the palette turns to mud. Seriously. Mix a little bit of each color, adding a tick at a time until you get what you want.....might be easiest to start w/a purple then add yellow.

Brush work, here's a link http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show....php?t=1053122 by DMcCamant who included a pdf link on brushwork that I found really useful, maybe you will too.

Feels good to paint, doesn't it?
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Old 04-08-2012, 06:43 PM
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Re: Crafor's 100

Great thread!
This is something I should do myself. I do find for myself, and noticing lately the improvements....is that I spend alot of time sketching lately. I paint alot, but every day in the evening I force myself to sketch anything...as much as I can.
I'm noticing lately my proportions are getting better, not where I'd like it to be. But I'm noticeing such improvement. Also I seem to be able to judge the midtones better, or distinguish between where the start and stop or shift.(if any of that makes sense)

I love seeing your progress here, great job!
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Old 04-08-2012, 06:47 PM
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Re: Crafor's 100

paint thicker man!


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Old 04-08-2012, 07:05 PM
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Re: Crafor's 100

Quote:
Originally Posted by illastrat
paint thicker man!
He's doing just fiiine as he is!

Crafor, good stuff, keep it coming! The way to improvement is through lots of practice and study, which you're doing!
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Old 04-09-2012, 01:54 AM
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Re: Crafor's 100

Good work. True study. Keep it up!
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Old 04-12-2012, 08:51 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

This is my second Sovek #2 exercise. I got the book, and these directions are more complete. This may not be totally correct, but I think it's closer to what is hoped for.
C&C welcome.
Crafor
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Old 04-19-2012, 06:29 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

#2.5 , 9"x11" plein aire, a study, prior to another "start", in pencil first, then in oil pastels, preparing for an oil paint "start".

Thank you all for your comments. As to the browns, I will just mix till the color turns to mud! Thanks for that idea, Libby.
Camton, thanks. Though it's taking a while to post each one, I am learning, and feel this is worth doing. I'd rather do size small as exercises, than large as throw-away "paintings"
Yes, thicker paint for some things. I'll be using acrylic primed cardboards for a while now, then maybe to canvaspaper.
Mariposa and SSB, thanks for your kind words.


I am learning that I don't "see" well, don't "comprehend", don't automatically understand, compute, draw, render, distances, sizes, colors, values, even while working on a scene, working to draw or color it.

This is the view across the street to the south of my house, my neighbor's homes. I got interested in the trees, and decided a "start" would be appropriate. So I did one. Never used oil crayons before, and the FIRST view was mostly of the trees that were in front of me, and a disaster THAT was!
So, I drew it out first, pencil on scrap paper, then worked to somewhat match the colors and masses, as in a "start".

I learned drawing is still king. On this one, I made an attempt to measure sizes, using the house door as my unit. In the drawing, the trees were relatively the correct size and sort of in the correct places. In using the pastels, the trees grew

I learned that at this stage (still kindergarden ), I need a few drawings first, just to get a better idea of what's there.

I learned a bit more about measuring and sizes, that comparing things against each other can give me an idea of whether or not I have to use my measuring unit again.

I'm learning to see shapes inside an object: A tree isn't just a cone, but these have ovals that contain the branches of that cone.

Though it's getting easier to see shapes and sizes, it's difficult for me to get that onto paper without measuring more than once, too often yet.

I'm beginning to understand what VALUE means, and I look for it, because I seem to have graphite or charcoal in my brain
I used a set of 48 colors pastels, and often wished I was using either graphite, charcoal or oil paint I worked to get the tree colors somewhat close, as to dark greens, light greens, blues, browns, etc, but the house colors were impossible.

I really need to work more on perspective, along with everything else.

I learned I AM improving. At the very least, I now have an idea of what strategy I need to use to get a better handle on my work.
This has MUCH more detail that what MacPherson calls for in his "starts", but these are Pre-starts , so, it's okay When I do the "start" I'll be able to render the view more correctly, I hope.
I'll be using cyan, magenta, and lemon yellow, plus white, and I'll add black, either Ivory or Magnetite Genuine. I will also try to stick to slashes and blobs of color, rather than details. (I used cad yellow light in the first one.)


This is so bad it's embarassing, but I will remember that even most of the masters probably started out as learners, too...
C&C welcome. Thanks for looking.
Crafor
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Old 04-20-2012, 08:19 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

# 23, 24, 25 C&C welcome!
#23, oil on canvas paper. I added a bottle and a box to the second Sovek #2 exercise, still no solvents. I'm beginning to have a little more confidence. I am using firmer brush strokes and a larger brush to help avoid detail. It's hard for me to blend because, I think, of lack of solvents, and maybe the small size/large brushes. I also learned something about over painting while doing the bottle .


24 and 25, both 4x6, oil on acrylic primed cardboard. 2 busts of same man, done with yellow ochre, Venetian red, burnt sienna and raw, permalba white, magnetite genuine. I did the first without a drawing, just massing color. I did the second with a drawing. The black, magnetite genuine, is not right for this application and my experience level.

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Old 04-26-2012, 06:41 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

# 26, 8x7, oil on acrylic primed cardboard. I'm doing the Portrait challenge for April and May, and this is my new version of Sargent's Young girl in white muslin.
This must be my "yellow period." I did a similar thing to a drawing a couple of days ago. In repairing her too pointy chin, I overcorrected, now it's too rounded. I'll do better next time. I painted a little more thickly, and tried to stay with larger brushes than I would have preferred, so as not to get too detailed. I was somewhat surprised at how quickly the oil was sucked up on this. I did some blending, but not a lot.
Permalba white, Magnetite genuine (black) yellow ochre, and a blue--don't remember which, also, hematite violet, so all earths except the white.
C&C welcome.
Crafor
Xposted in the Portraiture forum.

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Old 04-27-2012, 06:43 PM
dustonpaper dustonpaper is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

Nice work Crafor ... I immediately thought "hmm, the paint gets thicker now" and I like it. I had the feeling before you might be thinning the paint a little too much and over time I guess you will begin to paint even more thick than here. Good job on Choosing the big brushes. Like Sargent said: "The thicker you paint, the more color flows" ... and "Use yourself to a large brush" ... " don't starve your palette ... you don't want dabs of color, you want plenty of paint to paint with" .... I am a huge Sargent fan and memorized all that is known about his technique ... every so often it reminds me what he said. Even though there are only a few pages in the biographies about his technique and this here online:
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/sargent.html ... it is not much what he said, but a lot of important info and worth reading over and over again. I feel as one progresses in his learning, one understands his few one liners better and different every time read.

Also I enjoy you doing the Sovek exercises. As I said in the other thread, you are serious about learning ... and that state of mind will get you forward.
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Old 05-17-2012, 10:03 PM
crafor crafor is offline
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Re: Crafor's 100

#27 11x14 oil on canvas w burnt sienna imprimatur
no solvents, just walnut oil

I didn't do the beard yet-I think I'll do it last.
I have read till I'm ultramarine blue in the face, and still don't know if I'm doing this correctly. Maybe there is no ONE correct way, people seem to use different pigments and plans. Given my experience level (none) I don't know how successful this will be.
I painted as thinly as I could, but it still seems too much color. I did rub back a couple of areas. It helped in some, not so much others.
I learned:
a little of using a value scale and making a map as a foundation;
something of mixing a value scale;
to eliminate as much of the charcoal as possible as I go;
that raw umber dries pretty fast
color that looked brown on the palette looks gray on the burnt sienna;
for some reason, the darks on the cap are darker than under the bill, and that's not the way it's supposed to be! It appears there's less oil on the cap sections.
I forgot to complete the ear...
Not sure yet what I will do on this next layer other than the ear. I may do another umber layer in a few other places, but they seem pretty dark to me now. Looking at it again, I have a repair to make on the cap before it dries, lightening a couple of areas--already too dry...
I have no idea what to do with the background yet.
comments and suggestions, thoughts, welcome.
I want to thank Bill Martin and Alan P for their WIPS and their answers to my questions, and those of others. Your input enabled me to get this far, I am grateful.
Crafor
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Old 05-18-2012, 01:37 AM
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Re: Crafor's 100

Skin tones are not easy to do. In the past I've mixed up various combo's of cad red, cad yellow & white; yellow ocher, red & white. (mix, mix, mix, toss. mix, mix, mix, toss. etc.)

This post by Bill Martin is very interesting, in fact if I were to do a portrait I'd follow his footsteps.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show....php?t=1090322

You're doing good, nice portrait, skin's a bit pale tho.
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