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Old 11-13-2018, 03:57 AM
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Ryan Demaree Ryan Demaree is offline
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Re: Amber Varnish - Different brands

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArtistWithaView
Remember Donald is not against anything. He is not a painter. He just discovered the written formula and description of its use by the Flemish masters of the 15th century. If you use turpentine then the subtle effects that you are able to get with the formula are lost. The formula allows you to paint several layers wet into wet without disturbing the layer already painted, giving that luminous effect seen in paintings from that time period. Turpentine being a solvent attacks the paint and layers ruining the effect.

I understand what you're getting at, but I am puzzled as to how Blockx (the oldest manufacturer of amber varnish) could be doing something wrong.

Maybe Donald is working off a different recipe?

Overall so far if anyone were to ask me which one I'd recommend I'd say, Groves. But I have yet to use the Blockx varnish in practice, I've just done a test swatch with it compared to Groves. and I have nothing to go by on Alchemist amber but what you've been telling me.

I would recommend Groves to people because it is the most cost friendly, and the Groves website is loaded with info and other historical mediums.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:05 AM
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Re: Amber Varnish - Different brands

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Originally Posted by ArtistWithaView
The consistency of the Alchemist Amber Varnish is fluid. As far as James Groves vs Alchemist, all I can say is that the alchemist amber varnish is made according to the 15th century formula Donald discovered. It could well be that James Groves is using the same formula or a variant. Donald said that when he ordered James Groves varnish to sample it he could not smell the succinic acid that occurs during the fusing of the amber resin into the drying oil with high heat.

If you are referring to the Mayerne manuscript, the formula is actually useless, unless you dissolve young Copal.

Certain variants of Amber lack succinic acid, it is found mostly in Baltic Amber. For varnish making it is actually not necessary, it can be removed from the resin using distillation, and use it as insecticide or repellent https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28040844

Thermal treatment of Amber resin with turpentine improves its drying properties. While hot, you can mix it with OMS and store it for a long time.

Last edited by Humbaba : 11-13-2018 at 10:47 AM.
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Old 11-16-2018, 05:52 AM
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Ryan Demaree Ryan Demaree is offline
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Re: Amber Varnish - Different brands

Quote:
Originally Posted by Humbaba
If you are referring to the Mayerne manuscript, the formula is actually useless, unless you dissolve young Copal.

Certain variants of Amber lack succinic acid, it is found mostly in Baltic Amber. For varnish making it is actually not necessary, it can be removed from the resin using distillation, and use it as insecticide or repellent https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28040844

Thermal treatment of Amber resin with turpentine improves its drying properties. While hot, you can mix it with OMS and store it for a long time.

Eventually, I would like to try my hand at making some Amber varnish, but I hear it is complicated and dangerous- and you mention expensive as well
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:26 AM
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Re: Amber Varnish - Different brands

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Originally Posted by Ryan Demaree
Eventually, I would like to try my hand at making some Amber varnish, but I hear it is complicated and dangerous- and you mention expensive as well

It is not recommended to do it at home, but if you have space, you could give it a try in open skies, away from your neighbors because the smell is impregnating and horrible. In addition, hot turpentine is highly inflammable and toxic.

https://shop.kremerpigments.com/en/m...2/amber-pieces
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