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Old 03-29-2019, 09:11 PM
dknuckolls dknuckolls is offline
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photographing your art

Can anyone tell me where to find some info on how to photograph your art. I need to submit something online to be judged to get in a show. I waited to late to take my work to someone to be photographed, so help please.
Dorothy
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Old 04-01-2019, 02:07 PM
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DOMINANTPRIMATE DOMINANTPRIMATE is offline
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Re: photographing your art

https://www.saatchiart.com/upload

I found a lot of the tips here helpful.
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Old 04-01-2019, 03:54 PM
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Re: photographing your art

2pm outside. A really good camera.
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Old 04-02-2019, 06:34 PM
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bleu bleu is offline
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Re: photographing your art

If it isn't a really big piece, try laying it on the ground where your own shadow will not be seen on it. Stand over it and square it up in the lens.
If it's on paper and not too big, get it scanned.
Usually I photograph in daylight, sometimes outside -- yes 2pm is a good time of day
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Old 04-02-2019, 07:27 PM
Michael Lion Michael Lion is offline
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Re: photographing your art

1. Use a tripod.
2. Use the lowest iso your camera supports.
3. Put the painting on an easel.
4. Make sure that no light is shining on the surface of the painting. I only have lights BEHIND the plane of the painting (but not directly behind the painting, you don't want that). It's very important to do this to prevent glare. (I also use a polarizing filter, not sure it that makes a difference, but it can't hurt.)
5. Adjust the image in Adobe Camera Raw so that it matches how the painting looks when you view it directly.
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Old 04-03-2019, 12:22 AM
Aussiesrus1 Aussiesrus1 is offline
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Re: photographing your art

I use a tripod in conjunction with a shutter release cable to eliminate camera shake.

Ensure your artwork is in the same plane as the camera lens.

A completely overcast day offers the ideal lighting.

I use a 50mm fixed lens which is one of the cheapest on the market yet one of the most effective for photographing 2d artwork.

If the dimensions of your artwork are not proportional to the camera viewfinder then I suggest using a mid tone grey background to optimize exposure.

The mid tone grey can be created by mixing equal portions of black & white.

Using a camera setting which photographs raw & jpeg simultaneously can be an advantage.

Archive your raw images by transferring them to an external hard drive to save space on you pc.

Hope that Helps.

Michael.
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Old 04-03-2019, 10:13 AM
budigart budigart is online now
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Re: photographing your art

The most pesky problem with this is "keystoning," which happens to almost all self-taken photos of art. Here's a simple fix using Photoshop. I've used it for years . . .

Removing Keystoning and Perspective Distortions in Photoshop

Removing keystoning from a photographed rectangular work is not difficult in Photoshop. Use the Crop tool to get within a quarter inch of your painting, (but not too close). With the NAVIGATOR, ZOOM IN to at least 100%, or much more. Now SELECT/SELECT ALL. Go to EDIT/TRANSFORM/DISTORT. You will find in the corners, 4 small box buttons. Drag each of these out one at a time until you get each corner of your painting pulled tight to the corners of the image file frame. Press ENTER or RETURN (Mac), to accept these changes. Any perspective distortion present in the original image will be corrected now.

To get the proportions or aspect ratio of your painting back on track, take measurements of your original painting, go to IMAGE/IMAGE SIZE, disable the CONSTRAIN PROPORTIONS checkbox, so you can alter them. Now type into the height and width dimension boxes, the actual measurements of your painting. Since this may increase your file size to something overwhelming, you can reduce the pixels per inch to something much smaller than 300dpi to something like 96 dpi, or 72 dpi. Press OK, and your painting will be flat, square, true proportioned, and looking good! Remember to go back and reset the CONSTRAIN PROPORTIONS checkbox in IMAGE SIZE, for the next time you use that function
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Old 04-08-2019, 03:31 AM
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Re: photographing your art

Here we go http://bit.ly/2WSWg57
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:33 AM
chamisa chamisa is offline
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Re: photographing your art

For anyone using their iPhone to photograph their art, here is a great YouTube tutorial.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=S0g4a1Ge-Ds
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Old 05-23-2019, 05:25 PM
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Lifescapes Lifescapes is offline
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Re: photographing your art

I do not understand why we are supposed to paint by daylight or daylight bulbs but photograph our work in the shade. This results in a blued or grayed image. Someone out there please help.
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:42 PM
theBongolian theBongolian is offline
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Re: photographing your art

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifescapes
I do not understand why we are supposed to paint by daylight or daylight bulbs but photograph our work in the shade. This results in a blued or grayed image. Someone out there please help.

Blued if you have set the wrong color balance. Grayed if you have set the wrong exposure.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:29 PM
Michael Lion Michael Lion is offline
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Re: photographing your art

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifescapes
I do not understand why we are supposed to paint by daylight or daylight bulbs but photograph our work in the shade. This results in a blued or grayed image. Someone out there please help.

To avoid glare.

Use color balance and adjust color saturation in post processing if needed.

But I have no problem shooting my paintings indoors, as long as there are no light sources in front of the painting. So I don't recommend the shade or cloudy day thing; just get a tripod. Still need to post-process, of course.
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Old 05-24-2019, 10:45 AM
theBongolian theBongolian is offline
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Re: photographing your art

Quote:
Oriinally Posted by Lifescapes
I do not understand why we are supposed to paint by daylight or daylight bulbs but photograph our work in the shade. This results in a blued or grayed image. Someone out there please help.

In open shade you have even, non-glare lighting for "free". If you do not have photo- lights or a way to position them correctly, then shooting in open shade is a way to overcome that without spending any money.

Color balance and exposure settings will often be different than those used under artificial light and must be adjusted.
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Old 05-25-2019, 08:44 AM
Michael Lion Michael Lion is offline
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Re: photographing your art

Quote:
Originally Posted by theBongolian
In open shade you have even, non-glare lighting for "free". If you do not have photo- lights or a way to position them correctly, then shooting in open shade is a way to overcome that without spending any money.

Color balance and exposure settings will often be different than those used under artificial light and must be adjusted.

Like I said, I get glare-free photos as long as there are no light bulbs in front of the plane of the painting. No special equipment except a tripod and a decent camera (NOT a smartphone).

I do recommend high CRI bulbs, not just for photography, but also to illuminate your room when painting.

Do need to adjust in Adobe Camera Raw to get the right colors, but that applies to photos taken outdoors as well. Given that paintings or other art is normally viewed under indoor lighting and NOT outdoor lighting, it makes more sense to photograph under the lighting with which you'd normally view the artwork.
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Old 05-25-2019, 11:15 AM
theBongolian theBongolian is offline
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Re: photographing your art

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Lion
Given that paintings or other art is normally viewed under indoor lighting and NOT outdoor lighting, it makes more sense to photograph under the lighting with which you'd normally view the artwork.
There is no way to predict the lighting conditions a painting will be viewed under. Many people have incandescent lighting, fluorescent lighting, LED lighting, mixed lighting, uneven lighting, table lamps that produce glare, etc.

It makes NO difference if you take a photo in open shade or indoors. What matters is the result - an evenly lit, properly exposed, color-balanced photo. On my site I have photos taken in open shade, and photos that were taken indoors - you cannot tell the difference - because there is no difference.
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