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Old 01-04-2017, 01:59 AM
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SparrowHawk7 SparrowHawk7 is offline
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Thumbs up Encouraging Beginning Drawers

For years I've said that drawing is a skill and that talent has little to do with it. As a skill, it is something anyone can learn to do and learn to do well. All that is required is the desire to learn and the diligence to practice. Everyone starts at the same place ... Rembrandt, DaVinci or any other artist you can think of. Nobody was born with the skill to draw - they had to learn that through practice.

As we are getting more and more new drawers here I thought it would be a good idea for those of us with some experience to post comparative drawings from our first tries and then something later after we had built some skills. The idea being to show anyone interested that just a bit of practice and dedication will bear good fruit.

I started to draw in 2005 with almost no background but I had the desire to learn and I practiced for about a year. Here is the result of that. I know I am best known for drawing cats, but I started out wanting to learn to do human portraits so that is where my early work was aimed. This is my first try at a portrait and one I did about 1 year later after joining WC.



I invite anyone with similar comparisons to post their work here as an encouragement to any new drawers who might be feeling as if they cannot draw the way they want. Just keep trying!!!
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:06 PM
PermieW PermieW is offline
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

well, as a beginning drawer, I'd love to see this sort of thing. And it was nice of you to include your time period too, when you started.

OOC, it'd be interesting too to know how often people here draw. If it's a daily thing or random acts of drawing.

And I love your 2nd portrait, what a difference a year made.
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Old 05-12-2018, 06:54 AM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

I can only draw for a couple hours a day, after work and on weekend, at most.
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Old 05-12-2018, 07:11 AM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jsmay
I can only draw for a couple hours a day, after work and on weekend, at most.
That was my experience for the most part - except for me it was only on weekends although I had larger blocks of time those two days. What counts is that you stick with it. Skills take time to learn but we all can do it with dedication and practice! And nobody is fighting the clock with it ... it happens but because we're all individuals the amount of time varies individually.
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Old 06-20-2018, 04:33 AM
Infine Infine is offline
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

As I told in the welcome thread Iíve just recently found my ęinner artistĽ. Iím kind of surprised what Iíve achieved so far.

My first drawing was a sketch of my grandson from a photo where he did not smile (he is always smiling so that was a rare moment) I enjoyed the half hour I spent doing this, and I really felt good when his eyes turned up underneaht my hand. A comment from a pro artist on facebook motivated me, and made me think ęcome on, you can do betterĽ.

I went on line finding a lot of helpful tips. Iíve learned a lot, adaptet a few and went on developing. Maybe the most important, for me, is the use of time! Do not rush! And the outlines, there are no outlines in nature (even thoug I got that in my golf sketch) But, like the pro artist told me; when youíre in a plane, and you know youíre crossing the border of Sweden, you donít see the line, do you?Ľ

Per today Ií ve done a couple of portraits, Iíve done a golf theme and Sunday I started doing a dog. Thats when I found you, in my search of drawing fur. Iím so excited. So much to learn, so many wonderfull, skilled and generous people sharing ideas, tips and knowledge.

Iím so happy to have found you.

So, even if Iím totally new to fine art, I do want to share my development with you.

My grand son, done March 26. (Paper and pencil very low quality)


My son (schoolproject, acting in a ęfakeĽ Tag Heuer commercial) done April 17. Bought better pencils, good paper but itís maby not so good for graphite.


And at last (for now) the golf theme, done June 6. Blue Stadler Mars lumograph from 4h, 2h, hb and for the darkest parts I used a Pilot 0,3


Now Iíll go back to finish my dog. Looking forward to see a lot more of you all in WC.

Peace to all
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:15 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Due to time constrictions I was only able to draw on weekends for a few hours each day.
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Old 01-04-2017, 05:05 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Wow this is really encouraging. I work in retail myself and only draw/color/paint when I have the time. I find this to be really hard sometimes.

Especially after morning or 'middle shifts' (8AM-12PM etc.) I feel very tired and very unmotivated to draw. I seem to be able to paint and color just fine but drawing itself is highly stressful for some reason. The fact that work as a shop clerk is somewhat mentally exhausting doesn't really help.

I've tried to turn drawing into a relaxing exercise but it always turns into achieving. With coloring/painting I'm far more mellow and I can end up coloring for hours. With drawing I start to get restless after the first few drawings. As if I'm afraid of messing up if I continue.

I guess I just need to sit down and commit to it if I want to get better.
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Old 01-04-2017, 05:29 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

This is very encouraging and I want to thank SparrowHawk7 for taking the time to start this thread. I am a beginner as well. I have had an interest in drawing for a number of years. In the past I have attempted to begin a drawing habit and failed numerous times. Reasons for not being able to establish a habit generally revolved around family commitments and the responsibilities of life. A few months ago I enrolled in a short introductory to drawing class that was offered by my local art gallery. This time I am dedicated to establishing a habit of daily sketching and completing finished works. As a beginner we all look at established and skilled artist with admiration and respect. It is a wonderful gesture when someone allows themselves to be vulnerable for the encouragement and benefit of others. Thank you!
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Old 01-04-2017, 06:41 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Interesting thread Ken, I can relate in many ways. I've had no formal training, but started to draw in February 2011 because art always interested me and I wanted to pursue drawing/painting on my own - given time constraints.

You are right, practice is the number one thing that will let you grow as an artist - stop for a while and you'll find all kinds of rust building up. Drawing helps to keep me focused on values - sort of going back to basics, which translates into everything else that I create. I'm only at the beginning of this journey and hope one day I get out of my comfort zone and try new things like drawing loosely or with a pen, etc. I don't draw as often as I should but when I do it is the most relaxing form of art that I do - love it, so why don't I do it more often - good question.

Here is one of my first drawings 3/2011. The second is from recent times:


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Old 01-04-2017, 11:16 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Wow, what an encouraging thread!
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Old 01-04-2017, 11:46 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

One other thing we must keep in mind is the time involved in doing a drawing. I'm sure Mary will concur ... in my example, the woman took around 2 hours to draw and I thought it was a long time. The reality is that it was about right for a beginning drawing. The homeless guy took somewhere around 50 hours I think - can't remember exactly. Realism takes time and there are no shortcuts .. but if you enjoy the process you tend to lose track of time and just "zone" out as you draw. My newer drawings tend to take upwards of 120 hours but I'm more skilled now and I am working somewhat larger. The time, however, does not matter but be aware that you will have the same experience so please don't use the clock as any measurement. The important thing is to enjoy the journey as you watch the drawing unfold. And believe me, it gets more fun as you build more skill.
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Old 01-04-2017, 11:53 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Here's a 3 year progression of the same image. The first one met with a bad end - I spilled coke on it and it didn't end well as you can see. After that I determined never to drink and draw.



I'm not the least bit shy about sharing my failures. EVERYBODY has them whether they admit to it or not .. and so will you. It's normal. When one happens you just dust yourself off and try again (usually a different image though). And sometimes you will do something beyond your abilities which is a lovely experience. Drawing can be very rewarding but don't let the frustration get to you.
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Old 01-05-2017, 12:04 AM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

In an effort to nudge this thread along a bit ... since cats are what I'm best known for - here is one of my first cat scribblings and one I did a few years ago. I was a winner in an international art contest and this drawing was selected to be on the cover of the publication fairly recently. It's only practice ...

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Old 01-05-2017, 01:10 AM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

I fortunately don't have a record of my very first attempts at drawing
It took me ages to learn drawing until I found out the layering technique using different graphite grades. The zebra was drawn in 2013 and the elephants in 2016
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Old 03-03-2018, 09:21 PM
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Re: Encouraging Beginning Drawers

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuscanny
I fortunately don't have a record of my very first attempts at drawing
It took me ages to learn drawing until I found out the layering technique using different graphite grades. The zebra was drawn in 2013 and the elephants in 2016

Thank you for sharing! I think the biggest benefit of this thread for me is that an excellent drawing takes time, lots and lots of time. Funny enough, I did not realize that! I feel if I draw, I should draw an excellent drawing in a few hours! Yet in my painting in acrylics, I have a totally different expectation - that my paintings may take weeks or months to do.
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