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Old 08-27-2001, 03:47 AM
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Epicurea Epicurea is offline
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A few other suggestions

Sawdust, ash, earth, bits of dried foliage, small bits of dried, scraped up acrylic.

Acrylic also makes an excellent binder (glue) for collage/assemblage/mixed media works...apply random object (paper, foil, cloth, fibers, dried leaves, dried flowers) to wet acrylic & let dry. Paint over, or not, as desired.

And then there's application materials/techniques...almost anything can be used to actually apply the paint, or to make imprints. I've seen an acrylic/mixed media work that used the imprint of part of a hand towel, and I've seen a couple others that were painted over old dried pallettes (canvas or paper), which made for great texture. I've used the plastic wrap technique quite a few times (lay wrinkled plastic wrap over wet paint & let dry, remove & then develop whatever you see in the patterns, or leave as is, or drip different colors into the wrinkles after the first layer dries before removing the wrap, let dry again, etc.). I've also used the pouring technique in conjunction with a sheet of acetate just for experimentation; the paint in this case had bits of dried & scraped up acrylic in it. The results were quite interesting, I just didn't like the shapes I ended up with.

With a little creativity applied not just to the image but also to mix-ins, materials, and application, the possibilities are almost endless.


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Old 08-28-2001, 11:07 AM
ArtMarkie ArtMarkie is offline
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Question

Hello strawberrie,

I am doing some acrylic painting now. I want to build up
one area, maybe 1/4 inch higher than the rest of the canvas,
but not solid or flat. How have the pebbles worked for you?
Do they stay, or do they tend to fall out due to weight?
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Old 08-28-2001, 07:04 PM
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ThinkSeeDraw ThinkSeeDraw is offline
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hmmm... the large pebbles tend to get knocked off when appplied with a thin wash, but if the paint is nice and thick then it should do fine.... I just thought of something... what about wood chips and mulch?? (rinsed clean of course!!) But the thing is, u need to make sure that u have enough, cuz the less that there is, the more spread out the bumps will be, and the more likely for them to get knocked off

if u have any other questions, please ask, i'm always open for any of your questions
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Old 08-29-2001, 12:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by strawberrrie
hmmm... the large pebbles tend to get knocked off when appplied with a thin wash, but if the paint is nice and thick then it should do fine.... I just thought of something... what about wood chips and mulch?? (rinsed clean of course!!) But the thing is, u need to make sure that u have enough, cuz the less that there is, the more spread out the bumps will be, and the more likely for them to get knocked off

if u have any other questions, please ask, i'm always open for any of your questions

If you use sterilized soil ammendments (free of live bacteria and fungi) you should have no problem, save the inherent acidity of most types of wood chips. Don't use anything composted unless you steam it for an hour in a pressure coker. If you don't, the little nasties will reproduce and devour your painting.
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Old 08-29-2001, 10:57 PM
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WOw! DId u read about steaming the wood chips somewhere?? That is a great idea!! I wonder if u should let them dry completely, or if it's ok to throw it on your paint....

What if u steam it with baking soda in the water??? would that prevent it from going bad long after it had been used?? just a though
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Old 08-30-2001, 03:24 AM
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Pressure steaming is just a basic sterilization method; it has nothing to do with mixing the organic material into paint except to get the bugs out beforehand and forestall decay. The professional equipment for this purpose is called a steam autoclave, used mainly for medical/dental instruments. A stovetop pressure cooker with a steaming rack will do the same job, though perhaps not up to clinical standards.

Adding baking soda to the steam water may help buffer the acids in the wood products, but will more likely cause scale buildup in your pot.
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