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Old 03-21-2019, 05:54 AM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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Lumens, help

Hi
How much lumens should i get to my canvas for drawing and painting?
I paint in a classical way, i do chiaroscuro rendering.
800 lumens are too much? How much should i get?
Thanks
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Old 03-21-2019, 04:34 PM
contumacious contumacious is offline
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Re: Lumens, help

I like about 3200 lumens from the source lights which you would get from 200 watts total with incandescent bulbs. To get that I use two 100 watt incandescents or two 100 watt equivalent (1600 lumens each) LED bulbs in reflector lightstands on either side, up about 7 feet high and 35 degrees back from straight above the canvas behind and to wither side of the easel. You may want to step that back to 75 watt equivalents x 2 for a bit lower light that might match someone's home lighting levels better.

The key phrase if you cant find a Lumens rating, is wording like "100 Watt Equivalent" referring to the light coming from standard 100 watt incandescent bulbs.

Pretty decent explanations of Watts vs Lumens on these two links:

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/article...ng-light-bulbs

https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/s...lighting-facts
  • To replace a 100 watt (W) incandescent bulb, look for a bulb that gives you about 1600 lumens. If you want something dimmer, go for less lumens; if you prefer brighter light, look for more lumens.
  • Replace a 75W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 1100 lumens
  • Replace a 60W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 800 lumens
  • Replace a 40W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 450 lumens.

Last edited by contumacious : 03-21-2019 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 03-21-2019, 06:38 PM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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Re: Lumens, help

Quote:
Originally Posted by contumacious
I like about 3200 lumens from the source lights which you would get from 200 watts total with incandescent bulbs. To get that I use two 100 watt incandescents or two 100 watt equivalent (1600 lumens each) LED bulbs in reflector lightstands on either side, up about 7 feet high and 35 degrees back from straight above the canvas behind and to wither side of the easel. You may want to step that back to 75 watt equivalents x 2 for a bit lower light that might match someone's home lighting levels better.

The key phrase if you cant find a Lumens rating, is wording like "100 Watt Equivalent" referring to the light coming from standard 100 watt incandescent bulbs.

Pretty decent explanations of Watts vs Lumens on these two links:

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/article...ng-light-bulbs

https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/s...lighting-facts
  • To replace a 100 watt (W) incandescent bulb, look for a bulb that gives you about 1600 lumens. If you want something dimmer, go for less lumens; if you prefer brighter light, look for more lumens.
  • Replace a 75W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 1100 lumens
  • Replace a 60W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 800 lumens
  • Replace a 40W bulb with an energy-saving bulb that gives you about 450 lumens.
Thanks you!
Ive just looking for 2 light bulbs, 3750 lumens each so i get a total of 7400 lumens. Are too much?
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Old 03-23-2019, 12:17 AM
contumacious contumacious is offline
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Re: Lumens, help

Quote:
Originally Posted by axel9546
Thanks you!
Ive just looking for 2 light bulbs, 3750 lumens each so i get a total of 7400 lumens. Are too much?

That is quite a bit of light. Almost 500 watts of incandescent lighting. It would depend on how far away they are from the easel. Up close, probably too bright. Up high near the sealing and to the rear, probably fine. I have 400 watts on my ceiling fan and it isn't too bright to paint under. The angle is no good, but the volume of light is about right from that distance.

Last edited by contumacious : 03-23-2019 at 12:21 AM.
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Old 05-21-2019, 08:06 PM
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Ted Bunker Ted Bunker is offline
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Re: Lumens, help

I'm shocked at the apparent "brightness" that happened when I swpped-out a ordinary 100w CFL bulb with a 90-CRI 5000k Daylight LED bulb in my office over my drafting desk. Must. Buy. More. Bulbs...

I'm setting up a modest shadow-box station in my basement studio. Two 100w. equiv. 90-CRI 5000k LED bulbs behind and above me, but a 60w. or maybe 40w. 90-CRI equiv. for the shadow box itself? I don't want too-much light on the subject relative to the easel surface and my palette, but I do want strong shadows and value contrasts.
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Old 05-22-2019, 12:30 PM
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theBongolian theBongolian is online now
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Re: Lumens, help

I have my lights and easel set up where I paint and photograph without having to move the painting or change the lights - I paint standing with the easel on a wall and lights overhead, - so going from painting to photographing is seamless.

I had the lumens set for photographing, and didn't realize until recently that the light was causing eye-fatigue while painting due to being too bright. I always thought that it was good to pump a lot of light on the easel - that you "needed" a lot of light to paint well. What you need is quality lighting, not brighter lighting.

So now I have to use a longer shutter speed to photograph than I would like. It works, but at some point I'm going to install a second set of lights for photographing. So I would have the same set up, but just flick on the extra lumens when photographing.
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