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Old 07-07-2017, 09:38 AM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Question Movement of figurative works with limited details?

Has there been a movement or style where artists do try to represent real world subjects but trying to limit the number of details in their work, making it somewhat ambiguous to the viewers? For example, when contemplating a particular work, you think it's a figurative representation of an elephant but you also think it might be a sofa. It's just an example, but you know what I mean?
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Old 07-09-2017, 04:55 PM
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caldwell.brobeck caldwell.brobeck is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

I don't know if this is what you are looking for, but optical illusion art has a long history. Though, as far as I know, it's never been defined as a significant movement.
For example, there are some here, on the Wikiart page on Arcimboldo's visual puns - the second is the same as the first, but turned upside down. Similarly for the third and fourth paintings. They date to the mid 1500's.

Then there's things like the "duck-rabbit", like this one:

[courtesy Wikipedia]. There's better versions available, but I think that's the first recorded instance...

Anyway, there's lots more. You can find quite a few by googling "classical optical illusion art", and phrases like that.

Cheers;
Chris
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Old 07-09-2017, 10:31 PM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

Thank you caldwell.brobeck

I know I wasn't referring to that. Let me try to explain myself better: optical illusions are made with the intention of playing games with the observer through perceptual phenomena. Know what I mean? Now what I'm talking about –if there's such a movement– would probably be part of modern art. I'd say that in the movement I'm asking about, the artist isn't that interested in the observer –that would be the main difference with optical illusions. The artist would have only one subject in mind when creating the artwork just that the style implies expressing it with very little detail. The ambiguety would be a result of that but it wouldn't be the main intention of creating the artwok. Am I being a bit more clear now?

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Old 07-10-2017, 12:14 AM
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caldwell.brobeck caldwell.brobeck is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

I think I've got it you mean something similar to looking at a cloud, or tree bark, and figures kind of emerge? That's sort of a real life example; but artists have often done that as well, and I do it from time to time, especially in backgrounds. But I don't know of any movement that's made it a consistent practice, especially in foreground work.

Cheers,
Chris
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Old 07-12-2017, 03:37 PM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

I really appreciate your help and patience . It's not that either.

I looked a bit through the web. This is the closest to what I'm talking about:

Example 1

Example 2

They're figurative, with very little detail, and I'd say they can be ambiguous to the observer. Know what I mean? They're just examples; there are probably others made in different techniques.

Hope this helps to know if there is a movement related to this characteristics .
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Old 07-12-2017, 03:43 PM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

I don't know what happened. I tried to post an answer with a couple of links. A message popped out, but I was looking at another tab on my browser, so I only got a glimpse of the message before it dissapeared. And now I see my answer isn't posted. Am I not allowed to post links?
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Old 07-15-2017, 06:30 AM
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caldwell.brobeck caldwell.brobeck is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

Ok, thanks Gerardo, your two links did get posted. I know that in line drawing those sorts of suggestive ambiguous figures go way back, at least to the Renaissance, but it will take me awhile to find some old examples. I think there's some in Gombrich's Art and Illusion, but I can't remember; in any case it was in some book or other discussing the the engagement of the viewer's mind and its role in art.

I don't know if there's any particular movement with respect to that; but ambiguity in such is something that fascinates me as well.

Cheers;
Chris
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C&C of all sorts always welcome! (I don't mind rude or harsh criticism.)
I suppose I have to do this too (my blog, & current work). My Visual Arts Nova Scotia page.
Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known - Oscar Wilde
Look for yourself, think for yourself, draw your own conclusions. Then own them.
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Old 07-15-2017, 03:04 PM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

Thanks. I'll eagerly wait for the examples you can find and any information about a possible movement .

I'm really glad to know that you're also interested in ambiguity in visual works.
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Old 07-17-2017, 04:18 PM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

If it isn't a movement maybe it's a style. Might that be the case?
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Old 07-19-2017, 12:27 PM
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Use Her Name Use Her Name is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

Would it be abstract art, based upon or inspired by something like "nature"? For instance Sculptor Henry Moore's monolithic sculptures based on human form, and yet, looking like large blobs? I am sure you can find many examples of this.

Maybe "objective" abstract, which is abstract, but depicting reality.
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Old 07-20-2017, 11:12 AM
Gerardo G. Gerardo G. is offline
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Re: Movement of figurative works with limited details?

Thanks Use Her Name. With "objective" abstraction do you mean the following?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tate
Objective abstraction was part of the general ferment of exploration of abstraction in Britain in the early 1930s. The paintings produced by the group evolved in an improvisatory way from freely applied brushstrokes.
This is the source: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms...ve-abstraction


I think Henry Tate's sculptures are very related with what I'm talking about. I found the following in his Wikipedia entry:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
He is best known for his semi-abstract monumental bronze sculptures which are located around the world as public works of art.
Guys, do you know what's "semi-abstract"? Is it a movement or style in art? Might it have to do with what I'm talking about?
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