WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Oil Painting > Water Mixable Oils
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-01-2012, 12:39 PM
olive5018 olive5018 is offline
New Member
New York's Hudson Valley
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 10
 
Hails from United States
Uneven finish in dry painting

I did a small wmo painting for a fundraiser, that has to be delivered this Tuesday. It's been drying for about 2 weeks. When I took it out to look at, I saw some matte areas. I'm new to this medium, but have done lots of reading. Can't find an answer to what to do to fix this. I used mostly straight from the tube, with a little water for 1st layer. It's only 2 layers for the most part. I have wm linseed oil & also quick dry medium. Would a light layer of either blend the surface? I don't have time to do another, so would appreciate any suggestions!
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-01-2012, 04:02 PM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
Enthusiast
Framingham (Boston) MA
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,279
 
Hails from United States
Re: Uneven finish in dry painting

It's called 'sinking' and can be fixed by oiling out... but by Tuesday, maybe it can't be done.

Sinking occurs when the paint soaks into the painting support (perhaps a section of your canvas or board had too thin a layer of gesso), into the layer beneath, or when a certain matte pigment takes over (usually only with the earth colors, when those are derived from clays).

Oiling out is the application of a thin layer of oil over the finished surface. It confers the same level of oil film to the entire surface.

W&N appears to recommend it Artisan Painting Medium for this (scroll down to that medium on the following page: http://www.winsornewton.com/resource...ternative-oil/ ).

Unfortunately, the Painting Medium is based on Stand Oil and is slow drying. Two days probably won't be enough time. The Fast Dry Medium will dry sufficiently in 2 days, but might not be the best option, and I hate to direct you down a path that won't work...

It's possible that one of the fine-arts sprays from Krylon will work, possibly the Conservation Retouch Varnish, http://www.krylon.com/products/conse...touch_varnish/

The challenge there is to get it into your hands tomorrow. If you're near a Utrecht or Blick store, they might have it in stock.
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-01-2012, 07:54 PM
olive5018 olive5018 is offline
New Member
New York's Hudson Valley
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 10
 
Hails from United States
Re: Uneven finish in dry painting

Thanks for the links, Dave. With the reading I've done, I've learned a lot(& much on this site), but wasn't sure what I had was "sinking". Never thought to go to manufacturers' sites. Duh! I think I'll give the Fast Dry Medium a try. It's suggested for glazing, so it should be OK. I have to deliver Tuesday, but show is not 'til Saturday, so should be dry enough.
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-01-2012, 08:16 PM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
Enthusiast
Framingham (Boston) MA
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,279
 
Hails from United States
Re: Uneven finish in dry painting

Here's hoping I didn't mislead you.

I found a color chart I made 6 months to a year ago on which a couple colors sank. I just now coated one matte chip with the THIN coat of Artisan Fast Dry and one with a THICK-ish coat. I'll check it out beginning early in the morning tomorrow and report back anything I find.

The medium has a golden tone, a definite color, probably from the cobalt salts used as a drier, possibly from the linseed oil in the medium.

The good news is that the medium has dried to a shiny, tough film on the old sample-size shampoo bottle that I use for Fast Dry while painting. It's great for putting only a few drops of the medium into piles of paint. This coating *is* definitely tinted toward yellow-brown.

EDIT: just as a follow-up, here's the top of the plastic squeeze bottle. The area around the fold-down spout is quite thick, but the entire top of the cap is coated in dry Fast-Dry Medium. You can see the coloration and how shiny it is. (It is so shiny, in fact, that you might have to coat your entire painting to make the shine even.)
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit


Last edited by DaveGhmn : 04-01-2012 at 09:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-02-2012, 07:50 AM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
Enthusiast
Framingham (Boston) MA
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,279
 
Hails from United States
Re: Uneven finish in dry painting

As of 7:45 a.m., a little under 12 hours from application, the thinly coated color chip is just slightly tacky -- in other words, pretty much dry to the touch. The thickly coated chip is well skinned over but will still take a fingerprint. So, drying is probably not going to be an issue.

However, both chips are now extremely glossy. You'll either have to coat the sunk areas and judiciously wipe away the surface with a lint-free cloth until the shine on the surface matches the areas around it, or coat the entire painting.

Tomorrow, the painting should be handed over with a cover sheet of wax paper and instructions to keep the wax paper between the surface of the painting and any other object or painting.
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit


Last edited by DaveGhmn : 04-02-2012 at 07:53 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-02-2012, 06:41 PM
olive5018 olive5018 is offline
New Member
New York's Hudson Valley
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 10
 
Hails from United States
Re: Uneven finish in dry painting

Thanks for all your research, Dave. This forum is great for sharing experimentation & shortening the learning curve...
I went ahead & used Holbein Duo Quick Drying Liquid, which is what I have on hand. Since it is only 8"x8", I figured I'd coat the whole thing. The liquid was starting to dry on the palette before I even finished the thin coating. It looks fine & I'm sure it will be dry enough. I will use the waxed paper tip.
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 04-02-2012, 07:08 PM
DaveGhmn DaveGhmn is offline
Enthusiast
Framingham (Boston) MA
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,279
 
Hails from United States
Re: Uneven finish in dry painting

Brava -- and good luck at the fundraiser.
__________________
Judging a Manet from the point of view of Bouguereau, the Manet has not been finished. Judging a Bouguereau from the point of view of Manet, the Bouguereau has not been begun.
--Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:51 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.