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Old 01-12-2008, 10:37 AM
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H2O_Baby H2O_Baby is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

I took a class with Ron Pokrasso using oil-based inks. I got the impression that he likes dry paper because registration is more exact (wet paper expands) rather than anything to do with the inks. Wonder what he does when he uses intaglio methods.

If Akua is oil-based (soy oil) it seems like they should be somewhat like Daniel Smith water friendly linseed oil based inks. Those can be used on wet or dry paper, as can oil based inks. Depending upon the method used and type of plate of course. Hey if adding water works to thin them out and works for your plates why not? There are no set rules, just trial & error for each of our methods, right?
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Old 01-12-2008, 10:44 AM
Desmene Desmene is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Hi Diane,
Yes, I imagine any paper that thin would get saturated-- but wouldn't that happen with oil-based inks as well? You can overload any substrate. I suppose I'm questioning whether the Akuas themselves are necessarily the problem. Even a chalk pastel artist can push more media into a paper than it can hold. Just a thought... all the best, D
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Old 01-12-2008, 10:56 AM
Desmene Desmene is offline
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Re: Akua Intaglio

Hi H2O Baby,
Don't know about Ron's methods with oil-based inks, but we printed an intaglio Solarplate on dry Arches 88 and it was beautiful. all the best, D
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Old 01-12-2008, 12:59 PM
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H2O_Baby H2O_Baby is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Hey Desmene, we used the same paper - Arches 88 - and printed oil-based monotypes (flat) and monoprints. I shall have to try intaglio on Arches 88 then. Registration is so much easier with dry paper and Ron's 3 mark method was so easy (if you didn't forget to mark the paper).

His course here was spectacular, he is a wonderful teacher. Where did you take the course???

Barb
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Old 01-12-2008, 01:02 PM
Heft Heft is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Akua inks can be printed on wet or dry paper. This is stated throughout their literature. I use Akua intaglio ink for both intaglio and monotypes. I always use wet (soaked and blotted) paper for intaglio and will use either wet or dry paper for monotypes depending on what end result I'm looking for. I haven't tried any of their inks for relief printing.
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Old 01-12-2008, 01:10 PM
Desmene Desmene is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Hi Barb-- course was in Santa Fe at IAIA facilities, through Don Messic's Making Art Safely.
Yes his three-mark registration is *very* effective... and, yes, I forgot to use it, so had the learning experience of really appreciating how well it works once you remember to apply it (smile). Ron is indeed a master printer-- a pleasure to watch him work. I felt like I got a grad class in five days... a vast amount of material to absorb, but well worth it.
In response to Heft: I was amazed at how effective the Akuas were on dry paper with the solarplate intaglio-- and I'm always thrilled to eliminate an unnecessary step!
all the best, D
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Old 01-12-2008, 03:13 PM
Heft Heft is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

**I was amazed at how effective the Akuas were on dry paper with the solarplate intaglio-- and I'm always thrilled to eliminate an unnecessary step!**

I've watched Dan Welden's dvd on solar plate techniques - never had the opportunity to try it though.

I agree: wet or dry paper is really a choice open to the individual - not a requirement in the specifications of the Akua ink. For my imagery I like to play with plate tone when printing and have found printing dry can diminish tonal range (more contrast).
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Old 01-12-2008, 03:59 PM
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Diane Cutter Diane Cutter is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desmene
... Yes, I imagine any paper that thin would get saturated-- but wouldn't that happen with oil-based inks as well? You can overload any substrate. I suppose I'm questioning whether the Akuas themselves are necessarily the problem. Even a chalk pastel artist can push more media into a paper than it can hold. Just a thought... all the best, D
You know, you are probably right, D... I rarely do multi-colored plates and when I have it's been on heavier papers like Arches 88 or Fabriano Uno 90# watercolor. It probably isn't the Akua but the papers.

Diane
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Old 01-13-2008, 08:10 PM
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

The Akua inks dry by absorbsion, which means that they dry slower on (heavily) sized papers. My prints are on Folio White, which is quite heavily sized (you can determine how much sizing a paper has by brushing a little bit of water on it -- if it's absorbed immediately there's no sizing, if it stays on top it's heavily sized). However, before printing I've soaked the paper in water for about 4-5 minutes, which should have removed some/most of the sizing (the paper felt fluffy after removing excess water). Probably in the future I should leave it longer in the water.

I never had too much success with printing dry, unless it's on some mulberry paper. I'm a bit reluctant to spend a lot of money on Arches papers, they can get quite expensive -- and until now I haven't had problems with soaked paper.

The prints are still not dry, unfortunatelly, but I still haven't put them between newsprints (was out of town for a few days).

Tibi
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Old 01-14-2008, 10:10 AM
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Hey Desmene - I was in Santa Fe also - wasn't it fabulous?!! I had a print that I did on the Arches 88 that had a chine colle element in it. The added paper was matte photo paper that had been run through my printer and the ink had a tough time absorbing and therefore drying. I put a piece of news print on it with a weight and changed the newsprint every few hours. In 15 hours or so, it was dry - the problem is that the Akuas dry by absorbtion and so anything that doesn't get absorbed - doesn't dry - the trick was to pull the moisture out of the inks without taking out all the color - it took time but it worked. - Gail
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Old 01-23-2008, 11:18 PM
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

Just an update on the ink situation. I've put the prints between newsprint, stacked and with a bunch of heavy things on top. Left them for a week and did no good.

One thing that helped, though, was to run them through the press with some towel paper (the kind that's used in the kitchen for cleaning). The press had no blankets. This helped taking some of the excess ink off the print -- now the prints are ok-ish (there's still some ink that gets on the finger when rubbing, but not as much as before). I guess I'll have to live with them as they are now, and either avoid using Akua in the future, or use them only with un-sized paper.

Tibi
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Old 11-25-2017, 08:34 PM
rogalb rogalb is offline
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

I have an exchange next Wednesday and my prints using Akua intaglio inks are no where near dry. I'm blotting them now with newsprint, but I'm still not sure they will be dry by Wednesday. I think the problem may be that I've printed pthalo blue and pthalo green over black. That may be blocking the absorption. However the black didn't dry all that well either. Took a long time. I'm using Stonehenge paper, the same paper I use for intaglio printing using Daniel Smith inks.

Last edited by rogalb : 11-25-2017 at 09:14 PM.
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Old 12-11-2017, 01:45 PM
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Re: Speeding up drying time for Akua Intaglio

not sure if there is a solution with Akua inks in terms of drying. I am told it depends on the the absorption of paper fiber. That being said, I found traces of ink on my finger doing touch test weeks after printing using highly absorbent rag and thin layer of ink (and interior environment conditions were quite good for drying). I don't believe that addition of driers like cobalt or manganese will work with this ink. Although I like the colour palette of Akua I am finding more favourable results using other inks like Cranfield (Caligo) and Charbonnel. These can accept driers no problem.
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Last edited by bridog : 12-11-2017 at 01:48 PM.
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