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Old 09-07-2019, 11:58 PM
cwilliamson cwilliamson is offline
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Gazelle

Still working on animals in preparation for Inktober. If anyone has any suggestions on how to convey tautness in muscles or an animal in motion I'm all ears.

C&C welcome as always.

Clark

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Old 09-08-2019, 06:38 AM
pedlars pen pedlars pen is online now
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Re: Gazelle

Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilliamson
Still working on animals in preparation for Inktober. If anyone has any suggestions on how to convey tautness in muscles or an animal in motion I'm all ears.

C&C welcome as always.

Clark

Canson mixed media 7x10" sketchbook
Copic multiiner pens
Pentel gray brush pen

Nice work Clark, your outline is really tight & keenly observed.
"How to convey tautness in muscles or an animal in motion I'm all ears".?
That doesn't sound like the beginners class !
I personally have never developed the skill of drawing movement but studied all kinds of drawings carefully & bow in admiration to people who can do this well.
I think the answer lies in definition in both cases -so the taught muscles would be drawn to be more finely detailed compared to the lack of detail in the relaxed muscles ,more defined.
Movement - A good profile is the starting point, usually the animal/person should be drawn at the moment just before the point of maximum impact or extension. By doing this it suggests to the viewer to complete the movement in their mind.Your profile above surely ticks these boxes at the least.
Always leave space into which the animal can run into.
Draw the background thinly ,suggesting out of focus or out of viewers interest in the centre of a quick moment.Again you've done all that
So all of that to begin with! but now equally crucially the lines you use to draw the animal with & how may you choose to use - you need to use a pen or a brush which is capable of different weights/thicknesses of line or a choice of pen sizes.
Those profile lines do not want necessarily to be joined up.
The sight of a fast moving animal is a fleeting impression so detailed fur etc. will work against your aims.
I would advise you to start drawing it using the absolute minimum of lines to start with & stand back & have a long look at it.
It is all about suggestion.
Another way to go about this very challenging task is to (hard to put into words this) , on the profile suggest a blur around the moving part by offering alternative interpretations of where the leg or head finally is to the viewer. A bit like when you make a correction early on in a rough sketch when you draw that leg line a bit further forward to make it "right". But in this case don't make the "correct line" bold . So you have left the viewer to decide which is the line - indeed - they are all correct lines within the time of the movement! = suggestion & choice for them.
The perfection of all these devices & methods to suggest movement is balancing the weight of line in such a way as to make it loose & ambiguous, suggested - giving the viewer options as to interpretation of the drawing.
The above drawing is already further than half way there - you just need to practice more to build on this firm foundation. But I'm sure you already knew that too !

Mike

Last edited by pedlars pen : 09-08-2019 at 06:55 AM.
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Old 09-08-2019, 01:13 PM
LENGERT LENGERT is offline
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Re: Gazelle

Great drawing Clark. A sense of movement and power in the subject.
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Old 09-08-2019, 06:24 PM
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Charlie's Mum Charlie's Mum is offline
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Re: Gazelle

The action of the animal looks pretty good at conveying the movement ... he definitely looks as if he's running!

Like Mike, I'd suggest defining the muscles used in making the action.. and make sure your lines or hatching follow the form of the muscle so they really describe it... the counter-reaction will be less well defined so use lighter lines.
In painting, some painters show definition of the form going into the movement and a blurring of the form coming out of the movement and I think this is what Mike is suggesting too. Easier to do in painting of course!
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:06 AM
cwilliamson cwilliamson is offline
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Re: Gazelle

Thanks Maureen. I always have this moment when I start shading where my brain shuts down and says Just shade it. I start cross hatching and then my brain kicks in and I'm like wait...that wasn't right.

I really need to take a deep breath and pause before I start.

Clark
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Old 09-12-2019, 02:51 PM
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Re: Gazelle

What I do, and mind you I can describe it but I am less adept at drawing it than I am at describing it.
I typically work with dogs but also horses and all day I'm watching how their movement is conveyed. For a four legged animal to move forward obvious its legs move but the way each leg is grouped with other legs determines how fast that animal can run.
Watching a deer, or gazelle they have short fast bursts of speed. (I'm trying hard not to look up that word I want to use to describe this kind of animal.) So in fast running their four legs would appear to gather together under them, the back legs push back while the front legs reach forward. Here, in your illustration it appears that the gazelle is leaping forward, different than running so while it's back legs would be pushing hard back, its front legs would be tucking up under its chest for clearance. There would be far more muscle tension in the hind end.

For me to draw that I'd put a sign and an arrow: There is more power coming from here -> ! I'll eventually be able to draw it too but I tend to watch loads of films and videos to see how the animal moves and that makes it easier for me to draw them. (But mostly I make money telling people where their dog or horse hurts and how to help!)

Sheila
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Old 09-14-2019, 06:49 PM
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Re: Gazelle

I think you've gotten some great advice. I'm a visual learner so I like to see how other people do it.

I've always liked the horse in this thread (click here) you can see how Karen used shading to highlight the tension in the muscles.

In this thread (click here), you can see how he sketches so fast and yet still gets that sense of movement and drama.

I have to say, I like your style though with the heavier outlines, it may not be exactly what you wanted but I find it very appealing. It has a nice graphic quality to it.
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Old 09-14-2019, 07:05 PM
pedlars pen pedlars pen is online now
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Re: Gazelle

Yes nice one VMRS, thanks , that thread is of value.
Most of all - the horse is not balanced, in the sense that he could not hold that position for a second unless he was moving.
Mike

Last edited by pedlars pen : 09-14-2019 at 07:08 PM.
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Old 09-15-2019, 02:55 PM
cwilliamson cwilliamson is offline
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Re: Gazelle

Thank you Sheila and VMRS,

I think that in the photo I was using as a reference the gazelle was rotating his front end towards the camera to turn which confused the muscle structure for me. Those are some nice sketches in the link. I sometimes get confused whether the energy of motion is coming from the energy and speed that the pen/pencil stroke was made or the placement of the stroke (to identify the energy in the muscle itself). I think it will just take lots of practice and observation to get there, but that's half the fun right?

Pedlars pen, they do give off that momentum/tipping point energy don't they?

Clark
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Old 09-15-2019, 07:47 PM
pedlars pen pedlars pen is online now
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Re: Gazelle

Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilliamson

Pedlars pen, they do give off that momentum/tipping point energy don't they?
Clark
Yes very definitely, it seems to me that is yet another clue to the various ways to capture movement.
Mike
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