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Old 12-28-2008, 06:25 PM
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kevinwueste kevinwueste is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

Pretty much to a teacher at The Academy of art in SF and Grand Central Academy in NYC - they all drive the basic drawing/painting from the darks and, then to some general bright/brightest areas and then work through local colors in the mid-tones. since many of the lighter colors are so opaque, then can remain truly vibrant and "clean" ontop of other tones.. but rarely am I painting a light color over a shadow shape anyway ( unless it's an eye form then I do it all the time when the lights are above .. many ways to skin the cat i spose' but since i draw in graphite and charcoal the same way - it seemed only logical..
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Old 01-31-2009, 06:47 PM
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Mikey Mikey is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

Thaa's the way I was taught Kevin.
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Old 02-24-2009, 03:46 AM
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AndyfromVienna AndyfromVienna is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

hey friends,

I do mostly as Jocelyn does, but I make one exception with the eyes: i have to get them absolutely right, before I continue. if the eyes are slightly off I dont continue. The soul of a person is in their eyes I believe.

cheers

Andy
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Old 06-27-2009, 10:03 AM
elaine321 elaine321 is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

I have a copyright question.
You will see from my gallery that I usually use pen and ink or qouche to illustrate animals.
I have decided to challenge myself to do something different and try a portrait. We have a local show coming up soon and one of the catorgories is a portrait.
What I would like to do since Michael Jackson was the idol of my teenage years, is an ink wash portrait of him.
But I need to work from a reference photo which are all pretty much from the media. How do you go with copyright on a photo of a celebrity.
Are you supposed to get permission to use the photo and how do I go about doing that. Somebody told me years ago that you can use a photo from a newspaper without breaching copyright as long as you change it at least 10 percent. Is this true!!
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Old 06-27-2009, 12:23 PM
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

elaine, the answer to the last part of your question, the 10%, is a strong no.

I think the answers to your questions are at the bottom of my post beneath my signature line...the copyright issues.

I'm sure there will be many interested in painting MJ just as there are painting Barack Obama. And it all depends on what you plan to do with the painting once you finish it.

If you still have questions after reading the copyright info, please ask!
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Old 07-05-2009, 07:47 AM
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Randa2000 Randa2000 is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

i start drawing eyes first,nose,mouth...the only difficulty i found is the shape of face roundness,head position,when i draw the line for the head it takes me time to erase & correct ...is there any specific rules to follow
another silly question..where is the signature must be,at the right side of the canvas or left side?
thank you
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Old 07-06-2009, 11:04 AM
Dana Design
 
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

Quote:
Originally Posted by radar2000
i start drawing eyes first,nose,mouth...the only difficulty i found is the shape of face roundness,head position,when i draw the line for the head it takes me time to erase & correct ...is there any specific rules to follow
another silly question..where is the signature must be,at the right side of the canvas or left side?
thank you

Try looking at this:
http://www.worsleyschool.net/sociala...oportions.html

And your sig can go anywhere as long as it's unobtrusive.
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Old 07-31-2010, 07:05 AM
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

Hi everyone

I would be really grateful for some help with facial construction. As a relative newbie to portraits I decided that I should try and learn properly and so I decided to use the method of construction for facial drawings in the book by Andrew Loomis. Whether it's my lack of brain cells or just missing the point, I have had real problems with establishing the correct centre line and brow line from which to produce the plane to produce facial features. This is particularly difficult when I try to construct the facial features on a head that is observed anything other than straight on. From what I can tell, the Loomis method (whilst a little technical) is meant to take away the guesswork when placing the facial features and allow consistency.

I have tried to attach the relevant images and instruction from the book.



Any help that you can give would be gratefully received and help me retain my sanity

Thanks for helping.

Steven
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Old 12-17-2012, 12:58 PM
nitepainter2 nitepainter2 is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

very hard to not get caught up in small areas, thats the problem I have.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:14 AM
Moises Menendez Moises Menendez is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

I have a stupid question since I am an amateur artist-to be.
Since I like to work only on portraits from photos, I work immediately on the canvas and finish my work, however, I have learned that you should do an sketch of the proposed work and then bring that sketch to the canvas. This technique has been done by the old masters, as I have been told. What is the rationale behind this technique?
Thanks
Moe
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:15 AM
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Question Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

I did a portrait of my son last night and it did not turn out well.
what are the first or most important three or four things to render in
order to get a recognizable person out of a portrait. Is it eyes, head shape
moles, wrinkles, muscles, hair...charactature artists seem to have a knack
for pulling some of these features out of the model....I do not ...thank you
Pete
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Old 08-21-2013, 01:35 AM
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JUDERM JUDERM is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

I love drawing portraits in pencil. Based on my experience whether I do it from a photograph reference or live portrait drawing I will first draw an oblong to signify the whole face then a smaller circle inside the upper part of the oblong. Inside it I will draw a horizontal line across the smaller circle which will be the guide to draw the eyes and eyebrows and a vertical line in the center of the circles use as guide to draw the nose. I will also draw another horizontal line below the smaller circle of the oblong to use as guide to draw the lips. Then I will draw a rough sketch of the eyes, eyebrows, ears, lips and the nose using those lines as my guides. After drawing these rough initial sketch I will now make each of these exactly identical to the reference I am working on. Hope this helps!
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Old 08-23-2013, 06:51 PM
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

Thank you Guys, your comments are very helpful to my journey in learning to draw the head, I normally use pencil or charcoal.
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:25 AM
loozinit loozinit is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

I paint in acrylics and start portraits by using Paynes Gray and white to "chisel"in the form and contours of the face. Beginning with the darkest forms around the eyes, nose,corner of the mouth. I then mix in white to indicate the medium and lightest areas. When that is dry I use a wash of purple for the darkest/shadow areas and Sap Green lightened with yellow to make a lime green shade for the highlight areas. When that dries, I start using a thin coat of the darkest flesh color (Violet, Ultramarine Blue, Raw Umber, Burnt Sienna, Naples Yellow, Yellow Ochre, Alizarin, Titanium White, 'because it's transparent, I use Zinc White for the highlights in the eyes')
I scumble several layers of paint allowing the purple and green under-painting to show through and highlight small areas with straight violet. The final color touches are applied with Acrylic Glazing Liquid to either accent the highlights or push back the shadows and edges of the face to give the appearance of roundness, blending into the background.
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:59 AM
loozinit loozinit is offline
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Re: Q & A on Drawing/Painting the Head

I begin drawing a 3/4 view by establishing the general shape and placement of the head. Then I draw a curved line across the head to indicate where the eyes will go (about the middle of the head with the left eye slightly higher than the closest, right eye). The nose will be a curved line half way between the eyes and chin and the mouth half way between the nose and chin. Keeping in mind that the head is "round" I then draw a line from the crown down the top of the head toward the center forehead and down the center of the nose and mouth to the bottom of the chin. The next several lines divide the head into sections from the top of the head through the temple and down the cheeks to the bottom of the jaw. Each section becomes narrower as it moves toward the sides and back of the head. Each "section" is painted in a different shade of flesh color to indicate the roundness of the face. Glazing is an easy way to push the flesh color back to indicate the roundness of the form.
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