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Old 02-10-2017, 09:31 AM
DoctorT DoctorT is offline
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Question High Resultion Photos?

Hi!


I have a Samsung Galaxy Note Edge. The camera settings are Auto, Flash On, 16M 5312 by 2988 (16:9), HDR On.


Although 5312 by 2988 is a high resolution, after I transfer a photo to my PC and open it with Corel PSP X6 (64-bit) running under Windows 7 Pro, the image information says 5312 by 2988 but 72 PPI, which is a low resolution.


What is happening?


Thank you!


Doctor T
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Old 02-10-2017, 02:46 PM
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Yorky Yorky is online now
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

72ppi is the default resolution for image files on screen. The screen resolution doesn't affect the original file and that is why you can zoom in with a graphics program without the picture pixelating. The actual file size varies depending on the format it is saved with, some formats compress the files others save every bit of information. See this Wikipedia article.

Doug
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:05 AM
DoctorT DoctorT is offline
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

[quote=Yorky] 72ppi is the default resolution for image files on screen ... [/quote

Dear Doug,

Thank you for your reply.

I did find that, unless re-sized, the actual number of pixels doesn't change. What is confusing is that after opening the image using Corel PSP, the "image Information" shows 72 PPI. FYI, to create a new image with PSP one has to specify the width/height in pixels as well as the PPI. Not confusing?

Doctor T
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Old 02-11-2017, 09:15 AM
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

So long as you specify the required width and have keep proportions checked you don't even have to specify the depth. I use 800 pixels for the width or 600 pixels for the height to make sure it fits on screen without scrolling. No need to specify ppi.

Doug
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:22 PM
DoctorT DoctorT is offline
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorky
So long as ...

Dear Doug,

Again thank you for your reply.

I just created three JPG files, all three with 3,000 by 3,000 px but with PPIs of 1, 100, and 300. All three files are of the same file size.

Doctor T
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:28 PM
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

In other words the ppi is irrelevant. It is the pixel size which is important and the format you save it in.

Doug
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:45 AM
DoctorT DoctorT is offline
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

Quote:
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In other words ...

Dear Doug,

Thanks again!

Right on.

Doctor T
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Old 03-17-2017, 06:33 AM
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

This ppi issue confuses the most professional amongst graphic designers.

ppi means "pixels per inch" and is needed to define the pixel resolution in reference to an images physical size on an output device. e.g. A 3000px wide image at 300ppi is 10 inches wide when printed. Change that to 150ppi and the image will be printed at 20 inches even though it still has 3000px.

When resizing for screen the ppi value becomes irrelevant and can be neglected, because screens come in different sizes and resolutions. Here the pixel value is key to define a size. 72ppi is just a default value because it has to say something, and older screens average around that value.
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Old 03-27-2017, 01:55 PM
IanBertram IanBertram is offline
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Re: High Resultion Photos?

It is worth pointing out here, although not your actual query, that .jpg is not a lossless format. If you keep resaving your image as a jpg file, you will lose quality each time you save it. It is better to save as a .tiff file. This keep all the data in your image, rather than throwing part of it away in order to compress it.

See this wikipedia article for an overview. Usual caveats apply of course, but it doesn't look to bad.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lossless_compression
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