WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > The Learning Center > Studio Tips and Framing
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply  
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-13-2019, 09:38 PM
MarcF's Avatar
MarcF MarcF is offline
Senior Member
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 317
 
Hails from United States
Homemade brush holder

I've tried different ways of storing wet brushes in use, and when drying. Especially pesky are paint laden palette knives - they seem to wind up in all the wrong places. Standing brushes up is a no-no because the paint and media work their way into the ferule. Geneva sells a nice brush holder for about $100, which I saw as I watched several of this guy's videos I was linked to in another thread. I was tempted but $100 made me hold off. Then I saw this:
https://youtu.be/sSpCCTBmF20
and I followed that - but I made mine bigger - room for palette knives and brushes spaced generously apart. Like the one in the video it's canted from one side to the other so that any solvent or paint etc flows towards the brush end.
I still am going to stain it walnut. But other than that - here she is. I'd say it cost me about $20 because I went for nice modeling poplar for the side rails. (I also bought some tools for this and future projects. I'm not counting that cost).
Attached Images
    
__________________
my art page: http://marcfriedlander.com/Art.html

Last edited by MarcF : 07-13-2019 at 09:49 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-14-2019, 12:56 PM
marksmomagain marksmomagain is online now
Veteran Member
western New York
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 701
 
Hails from United States
Re: Homemade brush holder

Very nice Mark

I have one very similar, maybe one or two brushes smaller, and then another smaller one which is made for miniature brushes. Both of mine are made from my black walnut trees, the predominate specie in my yard. They are some of my first woodworking projects.
Reply With Quote
  #3   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-15-2019, 10:32 PM
MarcF's Avatar
MarcF MarcF is offline
Senior Member
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 317
 
Hails from United States
Re: Homemade brush holder

Thank you! Here's the finished brush and knife rack. I did a little scroll work on the end caps, and finished it with stain and polyurethane. I'm about to put it into service!
Attached Images
  
__________________
my art page: http://marcfriedlander.com/Art.html
Reply With Quote
  #4   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-16-2019, 10:11 AM
pa-paw's Avatar
pa-paw pa-paw is online now
Enthusiast
Lake Dallas, Texas
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,929
 
Hails from United States
Re: Homemade brush holder

I like your idea, as I am forever picking one off the floor that rolled off the table. The only draw-back that I see would be the loss of workspace.
I once converted a little metal swag lamp to a paintbrush holder by gluing tiny rare earth magnets to the paint brush handles. It was great for watercolor brushes as hanging the brushes allowed the bristles to maintain their shape. Unfortunately, I have lost that little swag-lamp brush holder.
__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pa-paw/
Photography and Art Work
Reply With Quote
  #5   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-03-2019, 12:51 AM
MarcF's Avatar
MarcF MarcF is offline
Senior Member
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 317
 
Hails from United States
Re: Homemade brush holder

I made a few modifications.
I added ballast. The ballast is in the form of rocks, in the lower compartment. It is now extremely stable, where before it was a little top-heavy and a little tippy.

I added many more compartments for brushes.

It now holds up to 48 brushes, 3 palette knives, and 6 rubber tipped wands of different sizes and shapes. Or you can put medium cups on the platform. With all this capacity, I still sometimes use the whole rack.
Attached Images
 
__________________
my art page: http://marcfriedlander.com/Art.html
Reply With Quote
  #6   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-09-2019, 03:33 PM
Richard P Richard P is online now
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,399
 
Re: Homemade brush holder

One suggestion: If you make the holding points a triangle cut into the surface rather than a semi-circle the brushes don't roll around and move so much.
Reply With Quote
  #7   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-09-2019, 08:17 PM
MarcF's Avatar
MarcF MarcF is offline
Senior Member
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 317
 
Hails from United States
Re: Homemade brush holder

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard P
One suggestion: If you make the holding points a triangle cut into the surface rather than a semi-circle the brushes don't roll around and move so much.
Hey Richard.
I know you're an expert painter, and I'm a kinda sorta beginner at that - although I've come a long way. Your Rembrandt series was engrossing.
But as far as designing tools, fixtures, and such - I've been retired now for 3 years but I used to do that professionally, and for almost 40 years. I designed tooling from toys to military jets and submarines. Not to pound my chest or beep my horn - or anything - but - I do know what I'm talking about for once.

So let me explain why triangular points would be a really bad idea, although they would indeed stop the brushes from rolling laterally (side to side).

First of all let's consider if there really are any ill effects of lateral roll.
I don't see any - as long as the brushes can't touch because they are confined to their respective semicircular slots, which they are. And they don't roll around in there anyway unless you disturb them.

But even if there were a big advantage to absolutely minimizing lateral roll, the triangles would still be bad because:
- circular features are the easiest to locate and size accurately
- circular features are the easiest to manufacture
- circular features introduce the minimum stress on the material both when created and subsequently
- triangular points introduce the maximum stress on the material when created and subsequently, causing the material to crack and fail either immediately or over time.

Actually, triangular holes - or any angular holes - introduce infinite stress at the corners, and are guaranteed to fail at some point, unless you put a good radius there, and now we're back to semicircular holes again, except with much more effort.

So stay with circular features whenever possible. Triangular solids are strong engineering materials but as holes they are disasters waiting to happen.

So, sorry if this went on longer than anyone expected but I used to write engineering reports on very high tech equipment - and I kind of miss it a little, actually - so thanks Richard R for the opportunity to exercise some rusty old chops.
__________________
my art page: http://marcfriedlander.com/Art.html

Last edited by MarcF : 09-09-2019 at 08:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-10-2019, 02:33 AM
theBongolian's Avatar
theBongolian theBongolian is online now
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,393
 
Re: Homemade brush holder

I keep brushes in two jars (down from four). It's less than ideal but considering my space limitations it's working.

I'd like to see you use your design chops to come up with a better way to keep acrylic brushes damp while you paint so the paint doesn't dry out on the bristles.

There are some gizmos on the market but they all have (fatal) flaws. When I'm done using a brush I put it bristles down in a jar and it rests at about a 35 degree angle against the lip. Putting bristles down in a jar of water supposedly ruins the tips by mashing against the bottom. My solution is to keep the jar filled with about 8 inches of water - the part of the handle that's in the water provides enough buoyancy so the tips don't get damaged. Of course it's hard on the glue in the ferals and hard on the wooden handle - but the brushes are usually worn out before it becomes and issue, and I can fix most of the damage any way. It's a poor jury-rig but it keeps me painting.

Build a better way for brushes to stay wet and painters will beat a path to your studio.
__________________
STUDIOBONGO
ciao - bongo
Reply With Quote
  #9   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-10-2019, 10:35 AM
MarcF's Avatar
MarcF MarcF is offline
Senior Member
New Mexico
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 317
 
Hails from United States
Re: Homemade brush holder

Bongo
If I painted in acrylics and ran up against this problem, Iíd tackle it and solve it.
But since Iím not grappling with that - because I paint in oils and watercolor- I have no feel for the solution. Since I try everything, eventually, Iíll get to acrylics one of these days, and then Iíll experience the problem you stated. Then Iíll find the solution and post it.
Till then, good painting!
__________________
my art page: http://marcfriedlander.com/Art.html
Reply With Quote
  #10   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-10-2019, 06:28 PM
FriendCarol's Avatar
FriendCarol FriendCarol is online now
A WC! Legend
the "Shallow South"
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 11,867
 
Re: Homemade brush holder

I am a watercolor painter, and years ago I designed a solution to the "wet brush problem." It's cheap and adjustable: (1) Get a roll of that holey-rubbery shelf liner (sold for $1 at Dollar Tree, of course). (2) Get a loose-leaf binder, of any thickness you like. (3) Cover the binder, as if you were covering a school textbook, with a custom-cut piece of the shelf liner.

To use it, just lay the brush down (head down, handle up) on the binder. You can do this both while painting or when finished with the brush. When the brush is dry, store it in the usual way if you like (brush tuft up in a jar).

This solution worked well for me for many months, the only issue being the area taken up on my painting table by the binder. Then I saw a "Brush Grip" and bought a couple of those. (Use duckduckgo.com to find the Brush Grip or an illustration of it.) I have a couple of the original design, built to hold on to a table or easel edge; I also have one of the newer design, with a rubber strap or Velcro(TM) patch for placing it. These are ingenious devices that have sets of curved plastic "tongs" facing one another in pairs. Simply slide the brush handle into one pair of opposing "tongs" and it is held very firmly and safely. To use that brush again, simply grab the opposite (brush) end and pull it out. There is no "fatigue" problem with the plastic "tongs", and one Brush Grip holds up to 8 brushes at a time.

If you needed to keep the brush wet, you could try my first solution (the covered binder) with a well (just below the low end of the binder), using a larger--thicker-- binder) that holds whatever medium your brushes need.
__________________
Audacity allows you to be at ease with your inadequacy, safe in the knowledge that while things may not be perfect, they are at least under way.
Robert Genn


Last edited by FriendCarol : 09-10-2019 at 06:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #11   Report Bad Post  
Old 09-10-2019, 06:40 PM
FriendCarol's Avatar
FriendCarol FriendCarol is online now
A WC! Legend
the "Shallow South"
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 11,867
 
Re: Homemade brush holder

BTW, I forgot to mention the reason I invented the "gripping binder" in the first place was so I could prop up my (watercolor) painting surface at lower or higher (adjustable) angles, to apply a wash, for example. The binder isn't empty, either; it holds my notes about composition, current palette/pigments, painting papers, brushes, or anything else I might want, as a handy reference.
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:37 PM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.