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Old 09-06-2017, 01:33 PM
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elizabeth ours elizabeth ours is offline
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Glazing

I need WFMartin!!! Question: in one sitting, how many glaze layers can be applied? Beading makes me nuts!!! Does wiping with windex or alcohol really work? Thanks
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:47 PM
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Lazarus E Lazarus E is offline
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Re: Glazing

how you can glaze in one sitting?
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:50 PM
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Re: Glazing

Quote:
Originally Posted by elizabeth ours
I need WFMartin!!! Question: in one sitting, how many glaze layers can be applied? Beading makes me nuts!!! Does wiping with windex or alcohol really work? Thanks

Hi Elizabeth!

Well, How many glaze layers can be applied in one sitting? ONE, I suppose, unless I'm not aware of something special that you have in mind. It is technically impossible to apply more than one glaze layer at a time, since you must have a dry surface upon which to apply another glaze layer. You apply one glaze layer, allow it to thoroughly dry, and then apply another glaze layer.

So, at one sitting, all you can apply is one glaze layer. You truly couldn't physically apply any more even if you wanted to.

Beading drives me nuts, too! It often seems like a "Catch 22"! The best surface for glazing is a thoroughly dry surface, but then, when that painted surface is thoroughly dry, its hardness, and glossiness often causes beading.

To counteract the beading, I include a natural resin as an ingredient in my painting medium, such as Venice Turpentine, or Canada Balsam. Sometimes that alone isn't enough to prevent beading, and the other remedy for beading is to rub medium into the surface, spreading it around until is so thin that I can barely see it, and so that the surface just exhibits a slight "sheen", compared to the surrounding untreated areas.

I rub in the medium with either my fingertip, or a small, cosmetic sponge. I do that until the beading ceases. Then, I apply paint into this rubbed-on medium.

My God, please don't contaminate your painted surface with such clandestine
"stuff" as Windex, and Alcohol! I totally understand that some painters are now recommending the use of such items, but I surely don't recommend doing such a thing--merely to prevent beading! I truly don't know whether it "works", or not in terms of preventing beading, since I'm not the least bit interested in subjecting my painting to the possible ravages of such inappropriate materials! To me it's not worth the possible risk. At least not when there are so many appropriate ways to prevent beading.
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Last edited by WFMartin : 09-06-2017 at 01:52 PM.
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Old 09-06-2017, 03:18 PM
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Re: Glazing

WFMartin, thanks so much. I have been doing only one glaze application per sitting (I guess my guardian angel kept me from getting into trouble here). As you've written before, I have been applying a very thin coat of glaze medium and rubbing it in with fingers. It does seem to help. I don't see the beading up as much on a first glaze, but it seems more of a problem in subsequent glazes.

I will have to check out Canada Balsam/Venice Turpentine.

Again, thanks so much for your info.
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Old 09-06-2017, 03:20 PM
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elizabeth ours elizabeth ours is offline
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Re: Glazing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus E
how you can glaze in one sitting?

Not saying I could complete a glazed painting in one sitting. I find it take quite a bit more and I wait until each layer is dry before applying next glaze.
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Old 09-06-2017, 04:24 PM
contumacious contumacious is offline
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Re: Glazing

You can cut the time needed for glazing layers to dry significantly by using an alkyd glazing medium. You will need to work faster of course as they start to tack up sooner than old school mediums. Alkyds will also increase the strength and flexibility of the paint film significantly over traditional glazing methods, reducing the odds of cracking. I find that M Graham Walnut Alkyd is excellent for glazing and is slower drying than Galkyd or Liquin. Galkyd Lite also works well for when you want a faster dry time but not as fast as regular Galkyd. Liquin also comes in varied drying times and densities. You can add in some regular oil to slow the dry time somewhat as needed. Test the methods first of course.

I know some people don't like alkyds but the option is there. I am guessing that if alkyds had been available to the master painters of centuries past many of them would have welcomed them on their palettes.
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Old 09-06-2017, 04:39 PM
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Re: Glazing

Re: Venice Turpentine. Can this be mixed with OMS and linseed oil or is the medium made with turpentine, a little Venice Turpentine and linseed oil? Thanks
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Old 09-06-2017, 04:42 PM
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Re: Glazing

Re: Alkyd mediums. I have used those in other painting and that does speed drying time. My main complaint about it tacking up fast is that it also does this in the brush. I found that my brushes got pretty gummy and didn't clean well at all. I do a first clean in OMS then wash with Dawn and rinse with water. I have trashed a few brushes with alkyds.
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Old 09-06-2017, 05:17 PM
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Re: Glazing

Quote:
Originally Posted by elizabeth ours
Re: Venice Turpentine. Can this be mixed with OMS and linseed oil or is the medium made with turpentine, a little Venice Turpentine and linseed oil? Thanks

Both Venice Turpentine, and Canada Balsam are the unadulterated, un-distilled saps of trees. There is no "Turpentine" (as we think of Turpentine) in either one.

The solvent that we know as "Turpentine" (distilled spirits of Gum Turpentine) is a liquid that is the result of distilling such tree saps. The distilling process creates the liquid that we know as distilled spirits of Gum Turpentine, leaving a hard, sticky substance, known as rosin, or colophony.

Real, true, bona-fide Venice Turpentine is the sap of a Larch Tree, and Canada Balsam is the sap of a specific fir tree. These are not "imitation", as is indicated on some brands of "Venice Turpentine", Shiva being the obvious one. "Imitation" versions are quite truly nothing more than rosin, or colophony that has been re-dissolved in the solvent, Turpentine, seemingly putting both substances "back together", but that is not quite that simple, because some solvents may be used to dissolve inappropriate solids that are not those from which it originally came. Hope that is clear.

If you want to check whether a Venice Turpentine is an imitation, or authentic, just smell it. If it smells like Turpentine (the solvent), it is not authentic tree sap, but instead an imitation. These natural resins are supposed to exude a "fruity", or "piney" smell, that seems quite fresh, and pleasant.

I have used both Venice Turpentine (the real stuff), and Canada Balsam (the real stuff) as ingredients in my medium, and I can tell you that either one can be used with Odorless Mineral Spirits, Distilled Spirits of Gum Turpentine, or Oil of Spike Lavender as the solvents, without any ill effects to the medium, or the paint/painting.

My latest, really useful medium is as follows:

2 portions Linseed Oil
2 portions Walnut Oil
1 portion Canada Balsam
2 portions Oil of Spike Lavender

The smell of this medium is quite wonderful.

Most of the Wet Canvas members already realize that I am not an alkyd enthusiast, and that my only experience with alkyd materials has inspired me to advise against their use--at least to anyone I consider to be a friend. I could not possibly use an alkyd medium for my glazing process, and expect to achieve the results that I demand for my work.
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Last edited by WFMartin : 09-06-2017 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 09-06-2017, 06:34 PM
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Re: Glazing

Thanks so much Mr. Martin.
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Old 09-07-2017, 02:20 PM
contumacious contumacious is offline
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Re: Glazing

Quote:
Originally Posted by elizabeth ours
Re: Alkyd mediums. I have used those in other painting and that does speed drying time. My main complaint about it tacking up fast is that it also does this in the brush. I found that my brushes got pretty gummy and didn't clean well at all. I do a first clean in OMS then wash with Dawn and rinse with water. I have trashed a few brushes with alkyds.

The Dawn is not getting them fully clean. Try Masters Brush Cleaner for when you are putting your brushes away. I have some brushes that have been used with alkyds for over 30 years, cleaned with OMS and Masters, and they are in great shape.

To keep the brushes from getting tacky in use, just rinse them periodically in OMS then Walnut Oil and wipe dry with a cloth. You can also add a bit of walnut or other oils to the alkyd mediums to moderate the drying time to suit your needs. I use both slow and faster drying mediums depending on the type of glazing I am doing. When I am doing a fairly simple passage that doesn't require hours of blending, the alkyds make it so much easier and faster.
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Old 09-07-2017, 03:48 PM
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Re: Glazing

Contumacious, thanks. I will have to check out the cleaner. I may go back to alkyds, but so far 24 hr drying time with linseed/OMS is working. There are times though that I wish it were faster.
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Old 09-08-2017, 05:58 AM
JCannon JCannon is offline
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Re: Glazing

Genuine copal makes a glaze layer adhere better to the previous layer, and to prevent the paint from running (if your panel is upright, as is usually the case).
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Old 09-08-2017, 07:13 PM
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Re: Glazing

Picked up Masters brush cleaner. Hoping I will see less splaying of brushes. I hate when that happens!!!
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