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Old 03-19-2006, 11:33 AM
andrew judd andrew judd is offline
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How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Thanks to everyone who have encouraged me to post a demo here.
I especially want to thank John Cox for his great posts and inspiring me to try the same thing... see his How I paint thread at.. http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show...hreadid=327977
I have taught at art schools and privately over the last several years and like John I am trying this on the internet for the first time. I am happy to have questions and am open to suggestions as I post and this will be a learning excersise for me too.
So down to business.... here is a picture of my portable "studio" This is my smallest paint box ... an old cigar box. I got the box for free and paid less than a dollar for studio tacks and paperclips to set up a working "pochade box"
For the cafes I work light and portable. I sometimes take My open M box .. http://www.openboxm.com/ ..with a tripod when I work a little larger ( 9 x 12 inches) My cigar box is for tiny paintings ... studies really.. and they are aprox 5 x 7 inches. This box holds my paints.. medium, brushes and palette knife.



I can turn my wet painting around when I'm done and the red paper clips you see hold the surface away from the inside of the lid so my painting isn't ruined. I will describe my medium paints and palette in detail in the next post.

Please bear with me while I take you slowly through my posts... I paint much faster than I post!

http://andrewjudd.blogspot.com/
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Old 03-19-2006, 11:35 AM
Keith2 Keith2 is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Andrew, do you ask people's consent before painting them ?
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Old 03-19-2006, 03:46 PM
andrew judd andrew judd is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Hi Keith.
I have never asked anyones permission. If someone looks uncomfortable I wil paint the areas around them first and wait till someone else comes along. The cafe seems somehow like a stage to me. When the right person shows I paint them in place. My paintings usually are not so detailed that a person would say "that is me" so I think I'm pretty safe there.
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Old 03-19-2006, 03:55 PM
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samhill samhill is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew judd
Thanks to everyone who have encouraged me to post a demo here.
I especially want to thank John Cox for his great posts and inspiring me to try the same thing... see his How I paint thread at.. http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/show...hreadid=327977
I have taught at art schools and privately over the last several years and like John I am trying this on the internet for the first time. I am happy to have questions and am open to suggestions as I post and this will be a learning excersise for me too.
So down to business.... here is a picture of my portable "studio" This is my smallest paint box ... an old cigar box. I got the box for free and paid less than a dollar for studio tacks and paperclips to set up a working "pochade box"
For the cafes I work light and portable. I sometimes take My open M box .. http://www.openboxm.com/ ..with a tripod when I work a little larger ( 9 x 12 inches) My cigar box is for tiny paintings ... studies really.. and they are aprox 5 x 7 inches. This box holds my paints.. medium, brushes and palette knife.



I can turn my wet painting around when I'm done and the red paper clips you see hold the surface away from the inside of the lid so my painting isn't ruined. I will describe my medium paints and palette in detail in the next post.

Please bear with me while I take you slowly through my posts... I paint much faster than I post!

http://andrewjudd.blogspot.com/

Fantastic, Andrew....really looking forward to this....thanks so much!....
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Old 03-19-2006, 04:16 PM
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ChuckL ChuckL is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Hi Andrew...
I just wanted to let you know I'm watching with great interest!
Thankyou.
...chuck
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Old 03-19-2006, 04:17 PM
andrew judd andrew judd is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Here is the second post for this demo.
I am showing a photo here of my palette and basic colours I use.
I have a small container of FRESH and CLEAN odourless turps.
The little metal cups both hold Walnut oil.
I sometimes use stand oil for a little thicker aplication but I find the walnut oil drys to a less shiny and more consistent finish.
I only use the Walnut oil when I am painting somewhat thicker ares of paint over thinner areas ... the old rule... Fat over lean. I find if I want to lay a clean stroke of colour over another a touch of Walnut oil helps when it is mixed evenly into the colour applied on top.



My colours are as follows from right to left...
1.Titanium white (in this case Amsterdam Paint) I like to use Permelba white as well when I can get it. I usually order it by the case when I'm in Canada.

The rest of the colours here are all Old Holland classic paints. Expensive but beautiful intense colours I must say. I also use Winsor and Newton colours interchangeably.

2.Cadmium yellow lemon
3.Yellow ochre light
4.Cadmium red light
5.Alizarin crimson lake extra
6.Cobalt blue
7.Ultramarine blue deep
8.Transparent oxide red lake

I used to mix a warm and cool grey but have stopped doing this recently in favour of mixing more colourful grey areas.

I am using a strip away palette for the cafe works at this size. When I use my open M box I just carry wet colours ready to go in palette area in the box. The less time setting up the better when you are on the fly.

All of these items take little space on a cafe table. I still have room for my coffee and dessert!

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Old 03-19-2006, 07:47 PM
Visualone Visualone is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Andrew,
I am so glad you are doing this. I truly enjoy your work and love your idea of painting in cafe's. It's going to be a treat to watch you do it.
Thanks for doing it. I know it's going to be a wonderful experiece to learn from you.
Go to it!
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Old 03-19-2006, 07:49 PM
Visualone Visualone is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Andrew,
I am so glad you are doing this. I truly enjoy your work and love your idea of painting in cafe's. It's going to be a treat to watch you do it.
Thanks for doing it. I know it's going to be a wonderful experiece to learn from you.
Go to it
Visualone
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Old 03-19-2006, 08:23 PM
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

This is great ~and ~I feel as though I have a front row seat! Maybe I'll order a coffee
Thanks Andrew!
Dawn
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Old 03-19-2006, 09:35 PM
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Is that Alizarin crimson on the coffee mug?



This is really cool. Thanks for this post.
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Old 03-19-2006, 10:13 PM
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Donna A Donna A is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Ever so much fun, Andrew! Thank you! I've enjoyed my little digital camera in a restaurant, but never considered painting there. LOL! Wonderful! Donna ;-}
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Old 03-19-2006, 11:36 PM
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

watching with interest Andrew! thanks for sharing!!
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Old 03-20-2006, 12:04 AM
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Carey Griffel Carey Griffel is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

I wanted to share some thanks for this, as well, Andrew, I love your cafe paintings!

~!Carey
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Old 03-20-2006, 04:09 AM
andrew judd andrew judd is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Thanks again everyone for the encouragement. This is definitely a lot less nerve wracking than the lectures I do at OCAD in Toronto Canada when as many as 60 students are watching a portrait take shape. The challenge writing this post seems to be finding the right words to say simply what is most important... I digress already!

Here is the next post.

I am showing in the next two photos my brushes and other painting tools.
I've tried so many different brushes over the years from the cheapest fall apart 50 cent types to the finest (and very expensive )Winsor & Newton Series 7 sable brushes. I have one conclusion...
Use Good brushes!
The question is always.. What is a good brush?
A good brush for me is one that behaves in a predictable way. Sometimes I find a brush that wears down a little to the point I can make nice textured passages. I have other brushes that keep a sharp chisled edge... and others that come to a perfect point.
I have fought too many times to get the drawing right... the values right ...the colours right and that last piece of desert in my mouth to try and fiddle with my brush coming to a good point! A good brush loads well with paint. A good brush is as important as good paint and CLEAN TURPS.
When the tools are right for the job ... the job is so much easier (or perhaps I should say you have a fighting chance).
Imagine a musician sitting down to a piano that is out of tune... they are defeated before they begin.

I know as a young ... hungry art student I couldn't afford the very best .. but I got the best I could afford.
Sadly ... I didn't know much about brushes or colour or canvas then and I bought some very strange things indeed. I still keep a few paints from years ago because the names are so weird!
I will discuss colour in more detail later.




The white brushes shown are synthetic from Boesner in Vienna. ( http://boesner.com/index.htm ) They are firmer than sable .. hold their shape better than bristle but hold less paint than either sable or bristle. When I am painting small I find I need brushes that give me more control over my drawing with smaller shapes to deal with. When I paint larger (up to 6 x 6 feet) I can get out the big bristle brushes and lay the paint on nice and thick.
The two yellow brushes are old bristle brushes and the names are worn off. They are cheaper quality brushes and I use them for quickly mopping paint into an area.
My favorite bristle brushes are Langnickel. Also I have a set of Raphael bristle brushes that have served me well for years.
I use flats... filberts and brights. (I dont usually use filberts in the cafe... I find the flats give me better control over architectural features.)
The other two important painting tools are a good palette knife and a strong cotton rag!
The rag serves well for wiping away passages I don't like (mistakes) and for applying textures and blending now and then.
The knife is a new paint tool to me in some ways... I took Richard Schmid's advice and am using it more and more for razor sharp edges and laying in large masses quickly.

I also remember reading somewhere Sargent saying you should use a brush that feels just a little too big for the job at hand and I must agree. I think this forces simplification of shapes and values without a whole lot of blending.

The second photo shows how I hold my brushes and a rag for cleaning as I go. That leaves my other hand free to paint and sip coffee.
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Old 03-20-2006, 04:57 AM
andrew judd andrew judd is offline
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Re: How I paint in a cafe by Andrew Judd

Here's a photo of the cafe. I should have taken a shot with more of the window but between shooting photos... setting up my paints and eating apple strudel I didn't think of everything.



For this demonstration I am painting a view I have painted before. I know I will be relatively unobstructed and the light was cool and consistent. This cafe also has some nice greens and yellows to work with.

The waiters know me there and I feel comfortable. Incidentally I have never been told to leave ... I did have one concerned customer one time ask me if I was making a bomb as he watched me set up. I assured him I was harmless in my best broken German.

I have had so many amazing things happen in the cafes as I paint! I have had several people (including the waiters) buy me a glass of wine. I've met artists from all over the world. I've had curious onlookers ask about prices and where I show .. and I've had the odd person sit immediately in front of me blocking almost my entire view and they never even notice me.
I wait patiently till they leave and continue on painting if the light hasn't changed too much. After all I'm in their space too.

A camera would seem easier I'm sure some must think.. but there is no better way to paint from life than to paint from life! The colours are there in truth.. the values are right and the atmosphere of coffee smells ,cigarette smoke, rustling of newspapers and chatter of cafe patrons seem to add an exciting importance to capturing it all in paint.

The cafes in Vienna are a world unto themselves. People come and go all day long and some folks sit in the cafe for hours. The tradition of giving a glass of water with your coffee (or melange) as they call it here is the official welcome to stay as long as you like.

No one brings a bill unless you ask for it and sometimes the wait staff are nowhere to be found when you do want the bill. Many famous artists have painted.. drawn and written in the cafes here and sometimes I feel the remnants of nicotine from ancient artist's cigars must cling to the ceilings.

Okay ... sorry for the small novel but painting on the spot is like nothing else I know for excitement and growing as an artist and a painter. I really encourage anyone to try it a few times and not be afraid of making mistakes in front of others.

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