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Old 10-19-2019, 02:39 PM
jawnn jawnn is offline
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Question Painting with Stand oil and chalk??

I am thinking about using Stand oil [polymerized linseed oil to {what consistency?}] with chalk to create more texture in my paintings of trees, because “Coatings prepared from stand oils are less prone to yellowing than are coatings derived from the parent oils”. I already make my own paints, so I know enough about it to start thinking about this.

But how much less?

And how much chalk powder should I use in the stand oil? Only enough to keep it from dripping down the canvas? But not so much that it will be difficult to paint with....I think I need a formula to start with.

So what I need to know is “will it thinken up AFTER adding the chalk?” [some pigments do that].

And also Does this need to be painted on a board? I use heavy duty 12oz bias cotton duck canvas, and several layers of acrylic gesso, 16 x 20” or 20 x 25” image, and yet manage to stretch it a tiny bit after I paint the canvas, when I mount it on the stretcher frame. Maybe I need to invent a way to stiffen the back of the canvas while I paint it whilst on the stretchers??

In other words: Does the chalk and stand oil mixture get brittle when dry? [good reason for a formula.]
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Old 10-19-2019, 03:05 PM
jawnn jawnn is offline
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Re: Painting with Stand oil and chalk??

also I need to know which stand oil to use with chalk...
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Old 10-19-2019, 04:23 PM
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Marc Kingsland Marc Kingsland is offline
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Re: Painting with Stand oil and chalk??

Never tried making this and I don't know if it's advisable or not. Stand oil has poor wetting ability so you'd need quite a high proportion of oil to chalk with this to avoid an immovable paste. It should be quite flexible, but also quite fat, probably too fat, and a pale semi transparent cream in colour. Possibly problematic at holding the crispness of brush strokes as well.
Localized areas of very thick dry paint will tend to equalize as much as they're able within the depth of the canvas surface. That is to say, thick lumps on the front will push to the back to make a lump visible from the rear of the canvas. Thus reducing to a degree, impasto effects. If you wish these to remain as protruding as when you first painted them, then the support has to be as unyielding as a solid panel.
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Old 10-19-2019, 04:32 PM
jawnn jawnn is offline
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Red face Re: Painting with Stand oil and chalk??

very good information....I think I would just need to experimentand not count on it working untill I learn how to make it over a period of time.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Kingsland
Never tried making this and I don't know if it's advisable or not. Stand oil has poor wetting ability so you'd need quite a high proportion of oil to chalk with this to avoid an immovable paste. It should be quite flexible, but also quite fat, probably too fat, and a pale semi transparent cream in colour. Possibly problematic at holding the crispness of brush strokes as well.
Localized areas of very thick dry paint will tend to equalize as much as they're able within the depth of the canvas surface. That is to say, thick lumps on the front will push to the back to make a lump visible from the rear of the canvas. Thus reducing to a degree, impasto effects. If you wish these to remain as protruding as when you first painted them, then the support has to be as unyielding as a solid panel.
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Old 10-19-2019, 06:07 PM
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Gigalot Gigalot is offline
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Re: Painting with Stand oil and chalk??

Spurgeon highly recommended his putty but I found it strongly yellowing and even brown. At least one of my painting darkened due to calcium carbonate overload. I did another technique experiments that seems to work better for me than putty. At least, student grade Titanium White (Van Gogh or Art Creation ) is safer to use instead of putty.

Last edited by Gigalot : 10-19-2019 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 10-21-2019, 05:57 PM
jawnn jawnn is offline
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Re: Painting with Stand oil and chalk??

well it is a lot more complex than I was wanting.....
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