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  #166   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-23-2003, 01:21 AM
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mjkohler mjkohler is offline
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Good for your Cathy.

Perhaps instead of all curves you might like to try a combination of curves, dots, lines.

Try and avoid any thing that might remind you of a symbol for anything (anything vaguely recogniseable )

mjk
  #167   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-25-2003, 09:53 PM
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Cathy Morgan Cathy Morgan is offline
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clear acrylic overlay is great!

I'm excited about the potential of the clear acrylic overlay I made this week. I've been using it to help with some 8x10 paintings. It stores easily in a flat ziplock bag so I can pick it up and hold it over the painting even if I have paint on my hands. Of course, if the paint is dry I can lay the grid right on the painting. Otherwise, I can hold it slightly above the surface and still see what I need.

Today I was using some leaves as stencils for paint, and was able to use the grid to place the leaves. It really made a difference. My placement is far from perfect, I'm sure, but better than it would have been without the clear grid.

This is a most useful tool, so I hope others are making them too. I got the acrylic cut at my local hardware store, so that part's no big deal. Right now I'm only working in the 8x10" size, so I just need the one grid.
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  #168   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-30-2003, 06:11 PM
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Cathy Morgan Cathy Morgan is offline
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how to make grid in computer?

What's the best way to make a grid in the computer so it can be laid over images scanned in?

I'm thinking of times when I want to crop or manipulate a painting or drawing after it's in the computer. It would be nice to be able to have a grid the size of the picture, to lay over it in a separate layer. Several people in this thread seem to know how to do this. Any suggestions?

I use PaintShopPro mostly for things like this - also have PhotoShop Elements but haven't used it.
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Old 08-30-2003, 08:37 PM
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Miss Bonnie Miss Bonnie is offline
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feelings

Don't some painters just feel design?
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Old 08-30-2003, 09:08 PM
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mjkohler mjkohler is offline
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Hi Bonnie

I am sure that there is design in all good paintings. For me however art goes beyond design. It embodies soul, emotion and intelligence. In essence some life. Design can contain intelligence but I am not so sure about it containing soul and emotion. Art is an act of creativity. Design an act of intelligence. These steps I have shown can be used purely with intelligence for design or they can be portrayed with soul and emotion to create a work of art. mjk
  #171   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-30-2003, 09:11 PM
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mjkohler mjkohler is offline
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Hello Bonnie again. I must have got up too early and read your posting wrong. My apologies.

Yes artists do feel design. However personally I do have off days. mjk
  #172   Report Bad Post  
Old 10-30-2003, 05:46 PM
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Brennen Reece Brennen Reece is offline
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Re: feelings

Quote:
Originally posted by Miss Bonnie
Don't some painters just feel design?

Some painters do just feel design. Usually, though, paintings that have been well designed (regardless of whether the design was "planned" or "felt") can be analyzed according to certain principles that can tell you exactly why the composition works.

These principles have been in use for thousands of years and are commonly found in nature as well as in art and architecture.

In music and in writing, there is a distinction between improvisation/freewriting, and composition. Usually, the best improvisors have studied and internalized the principles of composition. The same is true of the visual arts. The more you study design, the better your feel for it will be.

Also, there is a reason it is called "design" and "composition." This implies a process of building, of trying out different solutions to problems.

A lot of artists get really defensive about learning "techniques" of doing things like composition or canons of proportion. They think that learning such things will stifle their creativity. Picasso learned them and knew them well, most of the 1940s and 50s Abstract Expressionists were taught them in school and internalized them as well. Salvador Dali knew them and used them almost as obviously as Da Vinci did. John Coletrane and Charlie Parker knew music theory like the back of their hands. That knowledge and theory stifles creativity is a modern-day myth and should be debunked and discouraged.

The problem is when people think that a work of "art" is validated just because it follows theory. This is just as bad as the novice painter who think they are being creative just because they rely solely on intuition. I've found that much of this work tends to be derivative or naive, and you can read the artist's influences easily.

Sorry for all of the theory and philosophizing,

Brennen
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Old 10-30-2003, 05:54 PM
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Silver Silver is offline
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Brennan you must be a mind reader because all the things you have just listed have been running through my own mind. I thought that too much calculcation would make a painting too contrived. I will try to look at painings in a new light.
I am in the process of trying to join your site at the moment.
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Old 11-19-2003, 08:02 PM
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ronaldb ronaldb is offline
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moderators why isnt this thread sticky ???

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