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Old 05-19-2019, 03:47 PM
theBongolian theBongolian is online now
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Re: What I learned from my haul or...

Looks like you're off to a good start. I keep brushes that are "ruined" or that I don't use or like. I find that in time my methods change/evolve and a brush I didn't like becomes my favorite. "ruined" brushes often are handy for textural effects.

You can buy parchment paper at the grocery store for a few dollars. It's used a lot in baking. It's cool and damp enough in Seattle that i only use a stay-wet palette for summertime plein-air painting. I buy these orange colored shammies at the dollar store that are thin and soak up lots of water, and are great to use under the parchment - as good or better imo than the Masterson ones.
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Old 05-19-2019, 07:05 PM
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Re: What I learned from my haul or...

Cadfaeltex, you and I have the same approach to trying brushes. Try a few to see what works.
My nearest Blicks is about an hour and a half away. Hobby Lobby is forty five minuets. Did all my choosing from Blicks on line. Bought brushes from a few different makers. To see how they handle. For my style the ones I gravitate towards are the SilverBrush Bristlon and a Urtecht Tuscan. I've already ruined a Princeton Catalyst Polytip. Fuzzier than my beard now. Only used it twice.

The cheap brushes I like are the 1 12 to two inch brushes I get at both Dollar General and Dollar Tree stores. Yep, cheap house painting brushes. Use them as blenders and to gesso boards. Work just as good as the $4 and $5 brushes from walmarts.
I have a new pallet. A SealRight 11x14. Painted the outside of the top gray. Put my paints on the inside of the top. They hang upside down over a very damp towel. Keeps both paint and mixes wet when closed up. Unlike parchment paper my paints don't get soggy. And I have no problem using a pallet knife to mix paints.
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Old 05-19-2019, 07:41 PM
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BeeCeeEss BeeCeeEss is offline
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Re: What I learned from my haul or...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadfaeltex
I think one of my issues is Iíve got to find a palette solution that works for me. Today I tried a little plastic deal that came in a pack of three; think itís more for watercolor. Searching the forum for ideas.

I suggest you avoid using any plastic palettes that are really intended for water colors or gouache. Acrylics that become dried on one of these plastic palettes will be extremely hard to clean off. If you have to do a lot of scraping to get the dried acrylics off, you will wind up scratching the surface of the plastic palette. That makes it even more susceptible for the dried acrylics to stick even worse than before and become nearly impossible to clean off.

I use small flower-shaped porcelain palette dishes to hold my acrylic paints. They clean up like a breeze even if the acrylics dry on them. The small recessed paint wells help keep the paints moist with a little help from an occasional fine misting with distilled water.

You can find white porcelain paint palettes or containers in many shapes and sizes. There are even porcelain palettes that are styled after those big, multi-welled watercolor palettes that have big, flat mixing areas in the center. They are great but pricey. It all depends on your desires and your budget.

You don't have to buy something that is specifically made for holding paints. I've found white porcelain deviled egg dishes that work great as acrylic paint palettes. I buy them at the local discount store and they are super cheap compared to something made for artists to use.

The key is to avoid using plastic palettes for your acrylics. Look for something made from smooth glass or ceramic to help with easy cleanup.

By the way, when I'm done painting for the day, I give my paints a light spritz with distilled water and then cover them with a tight seal of Glad plastic food wrap. The paint sits in recessed wells so it doesn't touch the plastic wrap and the fine mist of water helps the plastic wrap seal air tight until the next time I want to paint.

Beverly
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Old 05-19-2019, 07:49 PM
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Cadfaeltex Cadfaeltex is offline
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Re: What I learned from my haul or...

Thanks for all the info and suggestions. Looking into them.
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Old 05-19-2019, 07:59 PM
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Re: What I learned from my haul or...

I also love my porcelain palette although I often grab for the Ikea plates as frequently as I grab the porcelain. Another substance I've used for mixing and holding paints is silicon which seems to be everywhere right now. I had received a free 6 piece silicone cup cake "kit" (no cup cakes included!) and I really like these. Thing is, when I move out of a stint of painting a lot of "things" I picked up to use get tossed instead of cleaned for the future. I have a new silicone ice cube tray which I'm betting would work well with paints. I have noticed that I like palettes with open areas for mixing and blending. With the exception of those who need a palette keeping the paints wet, almost anything can work as a palette. I even have a wooden one with a thumb hole. I've never used it but I have it in case I need proof of a palette!
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Old 05-19-2019, 08:00 PM
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Re: What I learned from my haul or...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadfaeltex
... Someday Iíll find my perfect palette....


For my color mixing palette, I use a stack of damp paper plates with a layer of wet paper towels between each one. The stack rests on a slightly larger Styrofoam plate to give the stack extra support. The moisture from the wet paper towel below slowly leeches through the bottom of the paper plate to keep my paints from drying out while I'm mixing colors. The surface of the paper plate is sturdy enough to support mixing with a painting knife, if I choose, or use of heavy body acrylics. The best part is, when I've filled up the mixing space, I can just peel off the top layer and start fresh on the next paper plate below. And I can just throw them away when I'm done. No clean up.

It took some time to develop the right amount of moisture for this stack. I thoroughly wet the paper towels, then squeeze out the excess water. I run the paper plates briefly under a stream of water from the faucet, then blot off the excess water from the mixing surface. I arrange the stack on the Styrofoam plate, then trim off any excess wet towel that sticks out. It's ready to go.

Oh, it's important that the paper plates be labeled "grease proof". If you try to use the ones that aren't, they will pill and start to tear apart quickly after you begin mixing paints on them.

Works for me.

Beverly
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