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Old 04-18-2014, 02:29 AM
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dgford dgford is online now
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Re: Calligraphy Online Tutorials

Mike, your inter-letter spacing is really showing improvement. Good.

But that pen-angle has lapsed again ! I think I may know the reason.

When you are making your letters you may be using just your fingers or working by moving your hand from your wrist. The hand and arm must remain locked in that pen-tip to elbow position so that when you make the downstroke of the L it is pulling back your elbow that makes that downstroke. Then when the horizontal stroke is needed it is your elbow that moves to the side to make it. When that is the technique that is used, the nib angle cannot change — unless you are writing on the far left or right of your paper. Hence the reason for sliding the paper to keep it in the sweet spot.

Imagine, for a moment, that I handed you a 2 inch wide nib (i do have one ! ) and asked you to make your letters 1 foot high. First it would be difficult to write them on a flat surface so the surface would have to be tilted quite a lot. Second, your fingers may move the pen 1 inch but certainly not 1 foot. Third, you would have to use your whole arm to make the strokes but the pen-tip to elbow hold would have to remain constant.

The same thinking applies to all calligraphy writing. I may be able to find a photo of me standing by the biggest piece of calligraphy I ever did. If so, I'll send it down to you.

So, it's another repeat, I'm afraid. But I do admire your willingness to stick with it and your determination to succeed. You are a man of my own heart — look at my life's motto at the bottom of this panel.

In Cornish it is "Vyag ew sowenna".

Geoff
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Last edited by dgford : 04-18-2014 at 02:35 AM.
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:38 AM
Dutchpen Dutchpen is online now
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Re: Calligraphy Online Tutorials

Quote:
Originally Posted by dgford
Mike, your inter-letter spacing is really showing improvement. Good.

But that pen-angle has lapsed again ! I think I may know the reason.

When you are making your letters you may be using just your fingers or working by moving your hand from your wrist. The hand and arm must remain locked in that pen-tip to elbow position so that when you make the downstroke of the L it is pulling back your elbow that makes that downstroke. Then when the horizontal stroke is needed it is your elbow that moves to the side to make it. When that is the technique that is used, the nib angle cannot change — unless you are writing on the far left or right of your paper. Hence the reason for sliding the paper to keep it in the sweet spot.

Imagine, for a moment, that I handed you a 2 inch wide nib (i do have one ! ) and asked you to make your letters 1 foot high. First it would be difficult to write them on a flat surface so the surface would have to be tilted quite a lot. Second, your fingers may move the pen 1 inch but certainly not 1 foot. Third, you would have to use your whole arm to make the strokes but the pen-tip to elbow hold would have to remain constant.

The same thinking applies to all calligraphy writing. I may be able to find a photo of me standing by the biggest piece of calligraphy I ever did. If so, I'll send it down to you.

So, it's another repeat, I'm afraid. But I do admire your willingness to stick with it and your determination to succeed. You are a man of my own heart — look at my life's motto at the bottom of this panel.

In Cornish it is "Vyag ew sowenna".

Geoff

Thanks so much Geoff..........NO PROBLEM WITH THE REPEAT OF THE EXERCISE ITS A LEARNING CURVE..............but firstly a couple of questions

Ive cut down an Artist stand as a writing top,but actually writing on
a piece of Popular ply

I will enclose A FEW PHOTOS for you to examine

What is the best method use after viewing the photos

What angle should the top be set too!!
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:44 AM
Dutchpen Dutchpen is online now
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Re: Calligraphy Online Tutorials

geoff
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Look forward to your advice please


Kind Regards Mike
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Old 04-18-2014, 08:56 AM
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dgford dgford is online now
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Re: Calligraphy Online Tutorials

You handle your camera very well in these photos, Mike.

It looks good, providing you don't have to lean forward to reach your writing area. If it is too far forward it will make it difficult to control your pen movements and letter shapes but, worse, it will cause you to have back prob;ems — not good!

The tilt decision is a very personal one. Try a few different tilts and stick with what feels most comfortable to you. just make sure that you can easily move your paper around as you wriie.

Mike, I truly believe that you should be looking around for a scanner. A printer with an inbuilt scanner is ideal and they can be bought quite cheaply nowadays — directly from computer stores, discount stores, online or e-bay. The amount of calligraphy that you are aiming to become involved with suggests that you will saving an incredible amount of time, getting impeccably sharp results and having a permanent facility for scanning, photo-copying, making permanent print-outs of your better works, even faxing (if you are into that thing), printing scanned Christmas Cards, etc. Do please consider it. It is not a luxury but a wonderful Easter present for yourself.

I can't find the image with me standing beside it but here is the work itself. The largest pen I could buy was a 1" Coit so I made my own 2" from a strip of balsa and then worked with the Coit over it. The work is on a 6ft length of Stonehenge paper pounced well with gum sandarac to get crisp edges. I set up an outdoors BBQ table at a slope over the chairs so that I could stand and work, whilst being able to slide the paper up or down to suit my reach.

It was commissioned to be a presentation as a wall hanging in an Historic Museum. Can you imagine the challenge with that 4ft tail of the G. I note now that the space between the O and H in JOHN LISTER is a little too much. But I am very happy with the open spacing in FIRST PAYABLE.

Happy Easter

Geoff

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