WetCanvas
Home Member Services Content Areas Tools Info Center WC Partners Shop Help
Channels:
Search for:
in:

Welcome to the WetCanvas forums. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please visit our help center.

Go Back   WetCanvas > Explore Media > Colored Pencil > Colored Pencil Library
User Name
Password
Register Mark Forums Read

Salute to our Partners
WC! Sponsors

Our Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #46   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-10-2015, 01:32 PM
Delofasht's Avatar
Delofasht Delofasht is offline
Lord of the Arts
Salisbury, Maryland
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,249
 
Hails from United States
Re: Tips and Tricks

You are most welcome Brissie, it's nice to have a place to put all these little tips and tricks into one spot for easy reference.
__________________
- Delo

Delofasht.deviantart.com
Reply With Quote
  #47   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-10-2015, 04:22 PM
Delofasht's Avatar
Delofasht Delofasht is offline
Lord of the Arts
Salisbury, Maryland
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,249
 
Hails from United States
Re: Tips and Tricks

Tip on creating good blacks. Often as colored pencil users we tend to use the right pencil for the right job, but then we get to black, and find it hard to achieve a good coverage or depth of black that we need. It often ends up being more gray than we intend, as a solution to this one can try layering dark red, blue, and green to achieve a richer dark. The idea here is for the layers of colors to absorb all the colors of light leaving no color to reflect back, thus appearing black.

You can also layer these colors under or over black to further push that depth of color and are more likely to achieve the look one often seeks when trying to make a black. Solvents used with this method an also produce a VERY dark dark dark black. Lastly, the tooth of the surface can further enhance the appearance of black, it is quite difficult to get a good dark black on a very smooth surface, as the paper tooth will only accept so much pigment (even dissolved). Thus toothier surfaces often will allow for a much richer saturation of color.
__________________
- Delo

Delofasht.deviantart.com
Reply With Quote
  #48   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-11-2015, 01:50 AM
nena1971 nena1971 is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 22
 
Re: Tips and Tricks

What kind or brand of paper does everyone like to use?
Reply With Quote
  #49   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-11-2015, 04:40 AM
antidotepictures antidotepictures is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 21
 
Re: Tips and Tricks

Hi everyone, very new to CP but found this thread quite by chance - it's SO amazingly helpful!
antidotepictures
Reply With Quote
  #50   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-20-2015, 04:08 PM
Delofasht's Avatar
Delofasht Delofasht is offline
Lord of the Arts
Salisbury, Maryland
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,249
 
Hails from United States
Re: Tips and Tricks

nena, I like most kinds of paper it is more of a matter for what purpose. Sketching is most any kind of paper, for more finished work I really like Stonehenge by the sheet (not the pads). This of course only applies to paper, my preferred surface is either Pastelbord (for professional work) or homemade panels with a custom chalk gesso.

There are a ton of excellent hot pressed watercolor papers, most anything 120lb to 250gsm or over is simply fantastic to work on. Fabriano, Arches, Canson, Strathmore, and so on, all good.

antidotepictures, I am thrilled that this thread is proving useful to someone. I had long meant to share my growing list of tips and tricks, really just different tools for different purposes. It is good to know they might be useful to others.

In fact, after some time of messing around my craft foam shading technique, I realized that I had not been using craft foam to it's full potential. We often buy very specific tools for blending, and in doing so generally find ourselves having to adjust to the edges that tool provides. I have started making my own blending tools out of craft foam. Pictured here is a small rectangular piece I have been using one edge of to do some blending on dry layers, this also works well for use with solvent, the foam soaks it up and allows for very even distribution of it without leaving brushstrokes behind. It requires practically no pressure to smooth colors, it blends areas together, and it cleans out with water (soap too if you used a solvent).

__________________
- Delo

Delofasht.deviantart.com
Reply With Quote
  #51   Report Bad Post  
Old 08-30-2015, 08:16 PM
Delofasht's Avatar
Delofasht Delofasht is offline
Lord of the Arts
Salisbury, Maryland
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,249
 
Hails from United States
Re: Tips and Tricks

I recently mentioned using rhythm lines in ones works to connect various elements of a work to another area. As an example I thought I would show this in a figure (as those are sometimes difficult to do but easier to see rhythm lines in for me), so this drawing is from my sketchbook, actually just done in graphite, and completely from imagination. . . yes I'd been watching Star Wars recently. . . Return of the Jedi is the best. I don't think there was an image like this position in the movie but the outfit struck me and I found myself mindlessly scribbling away.

I have shown a few rhythm lines that go through the form, the line itself actually disappears as we can see from the second image, but the feel of the line flows through the form and connects one part of the work to another.





I apologize that it's from my sketchbook and thus pretty small (I rarely draw much larger than 2 or 3 inches by 3 or 4 in size) as such when shown here it's a bit larger than in my sketchbook but I thought that might also make the lines easier to see. This is a tip for connecting the works and doesn't always have to be so literal with referring to lines, it could just be sharp value contrasts, as might be seen in a landscape of a mountain range, where a "line" is created by the edge of the mountain and disappears into a more midground element and the "line" is then picked up by a building in the foreground. This kind of thing links pieces of a painting together in a wonderful way and makes things feel harmonious even in spite of a lack of harmony often.

If you haven't tried this kind of thing before just load up a picture of something and try tracing the lines that flow from one element to another along a figure or in a landscape.
__________________
- Delo

Delofasht.deviantart.com
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:10 AM.


© 2014 F+W All rights reserved.