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Old 02-29-2000, 11:43 PM
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Mellryn Mellryn is offline
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Talking My new Pablo Pad :)

I just got my Pablo Pad plugged into my machine. Did some Dabbling in Art Dabbler.
It was kinda weird to work on such a slick surface as the plastic on the pad.
Here is a post of my efforts. The program is a lot different than Adobe stuff.


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Old 03-01-2000, 07:59 AM
dhenton dhenton is offline
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You didn't mention if you liked the differeneces compared to Adobe!. If you have a scanner, one thing to explore might be assigning detail work to a scanned drawing, and then using the pad/program to colorize or "paint". I can't draw on my Wacom for anything.

------------------
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"Art is anything you can get away with." -- Marshall McLuhan
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Old 03-01-2000, 10:02 AM
Fritz Fritz is offline
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Smile

What about control? Do you feel that you had more control when applying the color etc. as opposed to using the mouse? How large is the pad itself?

Mon
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Old 03-01-2000, 10:05 AM
Fritz Fritz is offline
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Thumbs up

BTW I like your first effort. :-) I haven't been able to do anything like this yet as I'm new to graphics programs. But it won't be long!

Mon
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Old 03-01-2000, 03:12 PM
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pixelscapes pixelscapes is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by dhenton:
You didn't mention if you liked the differeneces compared to Adobe!. If you have a scanner, one thing to explore might be assigning detail work to a scanned drawing, and then using the pad/program to colorize or "paint". I can't draw on my Wacom for anything.


I'd just like to second this question! See, I do a lot of this (for fun... not my "fine" art). Namely, drawing something, scanning it, and colorizing on the computer. I use a mouse but my husband has been considering getting me a tablet. I keep wondering if it's really worth it, though...? Especially for something I only do for fun.

I like how your tablet-drawn/colored pic turned out... I guess I don't know enough about your paint program to know how much of that is specific to actually using the tablet, and how much is specific to the program itself. What does the tablet let you do that a mouse wouldn't? Is it essentially an ergonomic issue (easier and more familiar to use a pen shape, instead of a mouse shape?) Any feedback appreciated!

If you want to know why I'm asking, here's a mouse-colored pencil sketch... http://www.pixelscapes.com/art/illus...zoameldemi.jpg

I'm hoping that a tablet would make things easier or quicker somehow...

-=- Jen / Pixelscapes
http://www.pixelscapes.com



[This message has been edited by pixelscapes (edited March 01, 2000).]
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Old 03-01-2000, 11:36 PM
dhenton dhenton is offline
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Well, one of the big features of most tablets is pressure sensitivity



Supposedly, this makes the input process more natural. There is the ergonomic advantage, but I think the biggest advantage is the ability to enter into a kind of "artist's state" where you interact with your image--not your mouse. Curved lines are a real bear with a mouse!!


My tablet is a 4 x 5 Wacom. It comes with a copy of Painter Classic, if that helps.
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Old 03-02-2000, 01:21 AM
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Electra Electra is offline
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I have a 6x8 wacom intuos tablet and stylus at work. I would not enjoy doing graphics without it.

Pix, if you don't have one, you will find it immensely easier for lots of things. I can't believe you can do that kind of quality without a tablet!

A tablet makes it easier for a number of reasons:

1) The pressure sensitivity that Don mentioned

2) The ability for a lot more control: curves are smoother, and you can get more detailed in position easier than with a mouse

3) You can add your own nuances to your creations using these two points

It changes your interaction with the image. You treat it like you would treat it if you were drawing directly on the screen. So nice!

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Old 03-02-2000, 11:51 AM
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pixelscapes pixelscapes is offline
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Cool

Maybe I'll find someone with a tablet who'll let me try it out.

I do think though, that I still manage to enter an artistic state using the mouse as my tool. Maybe I just think it's not difficult because I don't know any better, though. Or maybe it's because I spend so much time doing graphics, it doesn't seem like a struggle!

-=- Jen / Pixelscapes
http://www.pixelscapes.com
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Old 03-02-2000, 08:53 PM
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Mellryn Mellryn is offline
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The Art Dabbler program allows for different textures and sizes of various tools, marker, pencil, chalk, crayon, paintbrush, spraycan, etc. And you can also change to various textures for the paper, "Chalk" does some really cool stuff on the textures it's like a rubbing on some of them.

I just tried Adobe PS last night, It wasn't as flowing. I am used to Adobe PS for adjustment of pictures and slight changes, I did like the use of layers and filters. Here is a little bit of playing I did on Adobe PS last night.


I enjoy the interface. The slick texture of the pad surface is going to take some getting used to. But I'm enjoying it anyway. My next step is Illistrator.

My Pablo Pad has 8"x6" working surface. And yes there was a lot more control. The lines were soothly rendered. It makes them look drawn in rather than jerked in. There was a little bit of difference in Adobe and Art Dabbler in that Adobe takes up so much memory to run that sometimes I was moving faster than my Pentium III could render. Maybe I need to allocate more memory to the program.

Pix what program did you use on your slayer picture? Cool graphic.

[This message has been edited by Mellryn (edited March 02, 2000).]
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Old 03-03-2000, 12:05 AM
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Electra Electra is offline
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I think it's obvious that you achieve the artistic mode with a mouse!

If that's true, what more can you do with the freedom of the tablet?
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Old 03-03-2000, 08:18 PM
dhenton dhenton is offline
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Let us know how the ILLUSTRATOR goes. I myself would like to see a tutorial in that!
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Old 03-04-2000, 12:17 AM
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pixelscapes pixelscapes is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mellryn:
Pix what program did you use on your slayer picture? Cool graphic.

I used Photoshop...
If you liked that one, check out this one with added textures! http://www.pixelscapes.com/art/illus...ratapestry.jpg

Or... heck, just go to my illustration index. http://www.pixelscapes.com/art/illustration/

Hmm, maybe I should make a "Coloring and Texturing a line drawing using Photoshop" kinda tutorial... And I'd be sure to say it's much easier with a stylus and pad!

Man, I have so much to do. Gluhhhh...

-=- Jen / Pixelscapes
http://www.pixelscapes.com
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Old 03-11-2000, 11:07 PM
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pixelscapes pixelscapes is offline
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Mellryn, any new revelations or observations now that you've had that pad for a few weeks? I'm terribly curious.

-=- Jen / Pixelscapes
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Old 04-02-2000, 03:37 PM
Dotty Dotty is offline
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I,ve been using Corel 4 PP and a Pen Pad on all my work. I tend to favor landscape work. I don't have a stick with it attitude, but enjoy the time I do spend on it. Using a mouse is like using elbow action for all your strokes as compared to the pen, which you can use your other hand to brace just as though using an art brush.

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