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Old 09-14-2010, 11:26 AM
markandrewwebber markandrewwebber is offline
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what type of wood, and sizes?

Hello,

Im starting the idea generation process for a new city map carving, after spending 2 and a half months of walking as much of Berlin as i could!.

Ive never done woodcut before, so hope to find out some information, then order some small samples so that i can try them, and find out if i can even do it...

I am loving the idea of making a woodcut, it just seems like it might allow for a lot of detail so i would get to use more of the information i have collected, and the grain would be cool too!..

My idea though might not be probable for all types of wood, as i have no idea what the sheet sized of wood go up to!..

whilst in Berlin, i some how stumbled very much by accident into a printmakers, and also they sent me to a paper maker in the same building, amazing place. and great that he can make some big paper... and he was saying about how hand printing is the way to go!.

soooo

im thinking of making the next one around 250cm Sq to 300cm sq (98 inches sq to 118iches sq) ... but i have no idea like i said about sizes of wood and even types.. i mean ha i have not even tried it yet,, and it might not aggree with me, i might not like it so much as the lino.. but if i do not try then i will not know!. so any ideas would be awesome!.

even thinking of doing multiple carvings.. all ideas.. but yea.. might do a woodcut and a linocut. ideas ideas ideas... is all i am about at the moment!

kk cheers
from
Mark
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Old 09-14-2010, 11:50 AM
markandrewwebber markandrewwebber is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

just got this email from the printmaking supplier tn lawrences that said:


We used to supply side grain wood in Cherry which had a really nice grain. However, it was quite hard to cut. Artists use all sorts of wood, from plywood to pine flooring. It really depends what you want - whether the grain is important to your final print, etc. Harder woods will allow more detail, softer woods hold less detail...but are easier to cut!

We now sell basswood blocks which are a veneer of either basswood or poplar over a lightweight blockwood (not sure what the core is!). These have a nice grain, but also cut quite easily.
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Old 09-14-2010, 12:28 PM
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Diane Cutter Diane Cutter is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

I use a shina from McClain's (US supplier) but, of course, that's too expensive to ship large planks to where you live.

Shina is a very close grained plywood. I'm thinking the basswood Lawrence is selling would probably do the job nicely. The main consideration when doing woodcuts is to keep your knives very sharp, honing them often. I keep a rawhide covered block next to my cutting area and swipe the blade down that every 5-6 cuts on the wood. That way the knives keep sharp and I don't have to fuss with a whetstone.

Diane
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Old 09-14-2010, 01:33 PM
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Printmakerguy Printmakerguy is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

For your big prints, I think that you are going to want to try plywood or MDF. BIG pieces of wood are not very stable- they tend to warp and crack really easily. They are also EXPENSIVE.

That's a BIG print you're talking there- The 'standard' size for sheet ply is 4' x 8', or 48" x 96". Obviously, you're going to need more than one sheet.

You can use all sorts of plywood- the Shina that Diane uses is GREAT stuff, but doesn't come cheap. You can use the stuff that you find in home improvement stores, too- but its going to be a lot tougher to cut, and the grain will be more irregular.

Remember to try all sorts of tools, too- You'll want nice, and VERY sharp, wood carving tools- The tools that you use in Linoleum sometimes work fine, but there is no substitute for a good wood chisel. Dremel tools are great, too.

-Andrew
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Old 09-14-2010, 03:45 PM
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LynnM LynnM is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

From what I have seen and heard, MDF might be the best bet. You want fine detail, and woodgrain will interfere with that. And a dremel would help a lot. Just my thoughts! Good luck, Mark, I admire people with big ideas!!
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Old 09-28-2010, 03:57 PM
markandrewwebber markandrewwebber is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

CHEERS!
for the thoughts!
i have had a recent idea about how to carve this piece.. going to be ordering woods in the next few days to start testing, and choosing what i might like to use! also will be ordering the tools!

THE IDEA!!!!!!!!
so the idea i have had is to carve sections of the map design, and then slot them together at the end once then are all carved... slot them together like a big puzzle, and glue them to one big piece of wood... im going to start doing my experimenting with this once i get some tester types of woods.. but i cant see why it wouldnt work,, and it potentially could be any size then!..

This also means i will be able to use some really awesome types of wood! im not worried too much about expense as i have someone helping me out now, so any suggestions not thinking about price.. and what ideal wood to try out would be.. would be cool!.. though i am also going to see what the above woods you have mentioned would look like!!!
CHEEEEERS!
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Old 09-28-2010, 07:33 PM
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Diane Cutter Diane Cutter is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

The puzzle concept sounds like the perfect solution. You'll have to keep us apprised on how it goes...

Diane
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Old 10-01-2010, 12:24 PM
Foxtrotter Foxtrotter is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by markandrewwebber
This also means i will be able to use some really awesome types of wood! im not worried too much about expense as i have someone helping me out now, so any suggestions not thinking about price.. and what ideal wood to try out would be.. would be cool!.. though i am also going to see what the above woods you have mentioned would look like!!!
CHEEEEERS!

I believe it was Edvard Munch who on occasion worked like that, although he did not glue his pieces down when he was done. This made it very easy to do multicolor prints, as he could just ink up each block, fit them together, and print. You will, however, get a white line where the blocks join.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:34 PM
markandrewwebber markandrewwebber is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

Would the white marks still appear even if i carve down the edged of the slotted wood. i cant see that it would!!. but i have no experience with this process.. liking the idea of multiple colours doing it this way!! hmm great idea!. cheers!.

still yet to try carving wood but i have found a local woodcarving group of very interesting retired people that meet on a tuesday at a local school in the woodwork shop that is not used on that day for three hours...

interesting people, most are in there 80s with soo much exerience its amazing!. one guy has been retired for as long as i've been alive! one guy is an actual retired printmaking instructer!.

going back next week with some wood to get some idea of how plausable this whole idea is!.

if after a few weeks it turns out its too hard for the design at this stage to do wood.. i might just do it in lino... and practice with woodcarving for the next year or so!. for a later design, i think exerience with wood before spending so much time on something might be best!.

i
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:27 PM
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Diane Cutter Diane Cutter is offline
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Re: what type of wood, and sizes?

Not sure what you mean by 'white marks'... If you have natural grain in the wood you might like incorporating them. If not, a wood putty can smooth out large grooves.

You have a great resource at your fingertips with this woodcarving group. How lucky!

I'm sure the first thing they will teach you is to keep your knives sharp, easy to do with good demos close at hand. You may find wood is more forgiving than lino and not nearly as hard as we think initially.

Diane
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