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Old 02-11-2019, 03:38 PM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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New Studio Setup tips

Im making a new studio for me near my house.
I would like to know if you have any tips. I mostly do oils , charcoal, ink, watercolor.
I have sevelar questions
- lightning : beside the fact i need good lightning, how could i use natural sun light for the studio?
- ventilation : i need fresh air. How i can do it?

Other tips?
Very thanks
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Old 02-11-2019, 11:19 PM
contumacious contumacious is online now
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

This particular forum is kind of slow....so you might not see very many comments.

I will start it off with my thoughts on lighting. Unfortunately you can't rely on natural light all year long, and of course not at night. A high North facing window (You don't want direct sunlight on your easel) can provide very nice light, but it is worthless when it is dark out side. Thus the need for electric lighting in your studio for when you need to paint but the light isn't there.

The price of very high quality LED lights has come down significantly. Look for a 90+CRI index LED so your studio lighting will be balanced correctly. This brand is one of the less expensive for the quality you will get - www.viribright.com - I prefer the 4000K color temperature in a 100 watt equivalent bulb but the 60 watt equiv. cost less. A reflector / flood PAR38 will give you more direction lighting than the standard bulb shapes. They also offer 2700K (too red for me) and 6500K (too blue for me). Amazon often has them starting at around $2. Unlike traditional bulbs they are going to last for many years.

Old school fluorescent bulbs are in my opinion the very worst lighting you could possibly use for your studio. The color of light they give off is unnatural looking and can make your paintings appear off color when displayed in more naturally colored light after having been painted under them. Additionally, fluorescent lights are known to cause headaches, eye strain and even more sketchy health issues for quite a few of us.

Hopefully more will chime in on some of your others topics. You can also search for existing threads on this topic here and in other forums on WC.

Last edited by contumacious : 02-11-2019 at 11:28 PM.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:34 AM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by contumacious
This particular forum is kind of slow....so you might not see very many comments.

I will start it off with my thoughts on lighting. Unfortunately you can't rely on natural light all year long, and of course not at night. A high North facing window (You don't want direct sunlight on your easel) can provide very nice light, but it is worthless when it is dark out side. Thus the need for electric lighting in your studio for when you need to paint but the light isn't there.

The price of very high quality LED lights has come down significantly. Look for a 90+CRI index LED so your studio lighting will be balanced correctly. This brand is one of the less expensive for the quality you will get - www.viribright.com - I prefer the 4000K color temperature in a 100 watt equivalent bulb but the 60 watt equiv. cost less. A reflector / flood PAR38 will give you more direction lighting than the standard bulb shapes. They also offer 2700K (too red for me) and 6500K (too blue for me). Amazon often has them starting at around $2. Unlike traditional bulbs they are going to last for many years.

Old school fluorescent bulbs are in my opinion the very worst lighting you could possibly use for your studio. The color of light they give off is unnatural looking and can make your paintings appear off color when displayed in more naturally colored light after having been painted under them. Additionally, fluorescent lights are known to cause headaches, eye strain and even more sketchy health issues for quite a few of us.

Hopefully more will chime in on some of your others topics. You can also search for existing threads on this topic here and in other forums on WC.
Thanks! Im deciding where to make the window and where to position the easel.
As for light okay i think 4000k will look good, also are thoose led flicker free for the eyrs?
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Old 02-12-2019, 08:56 AM
contumacious contumacious is online now
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by axel9546
Thanks! Im deciding where to make the window and where to position the easel.
As for light okay i think 4000k will look good, also are thoose led flicker free for the eyrs?

I am very sensitive to flickering lights. The 60hz flicker of fluorescent bulbs and tubes is part of the reason that quite a few people find them unpleasant. I have not noticed any such issues with the current crop of 90+ CRI LED bulbs.

If you plan to install north light windows - south light if you are south of the equator - make them wide and tall, all the way to the ceiling and even onto the roof if you can manage it. If I were building a studio from scratch I would want the entire north wall and part of the roof (skylights) done in glass if I could afford it. A way to control the light coming in every window / skylight can be helpful for lighting portraits and still life setups and blocking direct sun at the times of the year when it comes in such has the height of summer. Being able to block the incoming light down at eye level with blackout shades / shutters / blinds is very important to control reflections on your painting as you work. You only want the light on your painting coming from above you and 35% behind you. Shutters / blackout blinds for the higher windows / skylights is not an absolute need but nice to have if you can afford it.

You might get something out of these articles. Remember not to buy into the recommendation to use fluorescent / CFL bulbs if recommended in the articles. As mentioned already, they aren't a good choice for studio lighting if you want the most natural lighting you can get. I would suggest you buy one bulb in the 4K range, one 5K and one 6K to see which you prefer before buying all the bulbs for your studio. The artificial light on your easel also needs to be up high at 35 degrees behind you from vertical. This will take some precise planning for your studio if you want to use natural light as much as possible and artificial to light your easel. Installing a track system with drop pendants allows you to place artificial light exactly where you want it without the mess of light stands and cords all over the floor.

https://willkempartschool.com/art-st...ghting-design/

http://www.stanprokopenko.com/blog/2...inting-studio/

https://www.finearttips.com/2010/01/...t-north-light/

http://www.drawmixpaint.com/classes/...ur-studio.html

Last edited by contumacious : 02-12-2019 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 02-12-2019, 09:51 AM
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Delofasht Delofasht is online now
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

I prefer 5k LED 90+ CRI bulbs myself, a couple strong lumen bulbs placed appropriately does the work for me. The lighting is very natural, no flickering noticeable, the light is not warm or overly cool, and feels the most like daylight of any I have used thus far. The bulbs were not cheap, roughly 17$ for the two pack, but they are 1600 lumens and can be placed about 4 feet away from the painting surface and still provide adequate balanced light.

If I could build my own studio from the ground up, it would be much as Contumacious describes. Wall of windows into a skylight, light controlling curtains and shutters for narrowing the light to beams from specific areas as needed, with electrical lighting for poor light condition days. The walls without the windows would all be lined with wooden cleats so I can modularly build and rearrange the space anytime I want to add or move something. Literally everything would be hanging on the walls when it was not in use, canít beat cleat.
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:33 PM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delofasht
I prefer 5k LED 90+ CRI bulbs myself, a couple strong lumen bulbs placed appropriately does the work for me. The lighting is very natural, no flickering noticeable, the light is not warm or overly cool, and feels the most like daylight of any I have used thus far. The bulbs were not cheap, roughly 17$ for the two pack, but they are 1600 lumens and can be placed about 4 feet away from the painting surface and still provide adequate balanced light.
.

If I could build my own studio from the ground up, it would be much as Contumacious describes. Wall of windows into a skylight, light controlling curtains and shutters for narrowing the light to beams from specific areas as needed, with electrical lighting for poor light condition days. The walls without the windows would all be lined with wooden cleats so I can modularly build and rearrange the space anytime I want to add or move something. Literally everything would be hanging on the walls when it was not in use, canít beat cleat.

Thanks you so much for the help! Okay for lightning im gonna definetly go for led 5k imo
For the lightning, as im italian, i do not understand what u mean with skylight sorry, but i make it clear, i have this little space 4x6 meters so 24 quad meters.
The sun at sunrise is covered by a house i have in front. St 10/11 am i will start receive the sun, from above ot Will be im High position to my Ceiling. Then at 5 to 7 pm ig will twiligjt in front of the studio, i mean on the Wall where the Door would be. How i could do it? Thx i will read the links you provide
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Old 02-13-2019, 03:30 AM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

Ive just undesrtood what do you mean for the natural lightning. But how do i know if im in nort light direction? I live in rome, Fiumicino. Ive post my compass result for Magnetic North https://imgur.com/a/HEscesI
78 E is where the sunrise
248 O is where the twilight
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Old 02-18-2019, 10:50 AM
Fabera Fabera is offline
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

This is very helpful, thanks so much. Is there a formula for the number of floods per square foot? I have a 20'x40' space with very high ceilings and am putting floods between the beams (open ceiling).



Quote:
Originally Posted by contumacious
This particular forum is kind of slow....so you might not see very many comments.

I will start it off with my thoughts on lighting. Unfortunately you can't rely on natural light all year long, and of course not at night. A high North facing window (You don't want direct sunlight on your easel) can provide very nice light, but it is worthless when it is dark out side. Thus the need for electric lighting in your studio for when you need to paint but the light isn't there.

The price of very high quality LED lights has come down significantly. Look for a 90+CRI index LED so your studio lighting will be balanced correctly. This brand is one of the less expensive for the quality you will get - www.viribright.com - I prefer the 4000K color temperature in a 100 watt equivalent bulb but the 60 watt equiv. cost less. A reflector / flood PAR38 will give you more direction lighting than the standard bulb shapes. They also offer 2700K (too red for me) and 6500K (too blue for me). Amazon often has them starting at around $2. Unlike traditional bulbs they are going to last for many years.

Old school fluorescent bulbs are in my opinion the very worst lighting you could possibly use for your studio. The color of light they give off is unnatural looking and can make your paintings appear off color when displayed in more naturally colored light after having been painted under them. Additionally, fluorescent lights are known to cause headaches, eye strain and even more sketchy health issues for quite a few of us.

Hopefully more will chime in on some of your others topics. You can also search for existing threads on this topic here and in other forums on WC.
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Old 02-19-2019, 02:53 AM
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axel9546 axel9546 is offline
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

If anyone saw the images what do you think? Where should i do the window (and door also will come light from that) https://imgur.com/a/KU3TShu
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Old 02-23-2019, 05:20 AM
anngrant anngrant is offline
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

Great idea! Keep us posted on your studio setting. Hope the result will be similar to Soflo Studio. Currently this is my favourite video production studio to rent.
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Old 09-16-2019, 04:23 PM
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Re: New Studio Setup tips

Sunlight is actually about 5000K, according to the Ottlite people. They make nice lamps, but they might not work for such a large studio!
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