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  #46   Report Bad Post  
Old 07-22-2008, 03:09 PM
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Cynps23 Cynps23 is offline
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamieWG
I drove to the other side of the Hudson River this morning to paint at the base of the Palisades. The cliffs face east, and glow when the morning light hits. For this painting, I used Golden OPEN colors:
Cadmium Yellow Primrose
Pyrrole Red
Transparent Red Oxide
Ultramarine Blue
Jenkins Green
Titanium White

It was pretty humid out and my paint stayed wet on my palette the entire time, without even a single spray of water. I can't say enough great things about the way this paint works for me. I've tried just about everything, and I'm hooked on this stuff.

This isn't a great photo of the painting, but I'm not going to take any more serious photos of my work until after my trip later this week. Too much to do!

Palisades in Morning Light
12x16", Golden OPEN on pre-primed canvas covered hardboard, which I then sized with Golden Matte Medium diluted 20% with water


I wore shorts and sandals and in spite of the DEET, there were little black flies that had an absolute feast at my expense. If it hadn't been for their company, I likely would have stayed to do another painting.

Jamie

Jamie,
Dang I wish my paint where here now. This is too WONDERFUL!!! I'm extremely excited for you and happy to view your painting. Thanks a great deal for sharing it beauty!!!!
Cyn.
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Old 07-22-2008, 07:22 PM
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JamieWG JamieWG is offline
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Theo, thank you so much! It was a very inspiring place to paint....except for those black biting flies.

Cyn, geeee...*blushing*...I am so flattered. Many thanks for your appreciation.

Jamie
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Old 07-24-2008, 10:35 AM
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shunter shunter is offline
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

I am packing up supplies for vacation and just cleared my pallette that I started on July 8th. First, I had plenty of wet paint left and rather than totally waste it, I played around with some thick blending on a spare board. We will see how it dries. Then when I washed my glass pallette, zero paint skins, very easy clean-up! I'll be checking in via laptop, but will not post anything until after August 3rd. Keep painting everyone .

Steve

Last edited by shunter : 07-24-2008 at 10:36 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 07-24-2008, 12:46 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Thanks for the initial thoughts on Golden OPEN... I'm about to post my own experience with them, but need to get this one more post out of the way before they let me post some images!
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Old 07-24-2008, 12:53 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

I am primarily an abstract painter and for my abstract paintings I'm very happy using a combination of Golden Heavy Body and Golden Fluid acrylics. But from time to time I like to do some representational work and sometimes -- especially with portraiture -- find the drying time of regular acrylics to be a problem.

As soon as I heard about Golden's Open Acrylics line I headed up to the Pearl Paint store (where they have the full product line) in Iselin, NJ, and bought some samples to experiment with. I thought I'd share my experiences with others who might be curious. For those interested in the bottom line: I'm very happy with these paints and plan to continue using them for representational work where smooth blending is required.

[I had experimented with the Atelier Interactive line about a year ago (ugh, I went overboard and bought a lot of paint) but was rather frustrated with those paints as they didn't really stay open very long. I admit, though, that I might not have been using them properly. Not knowing any better, I used a Stay-Wet palette for the Interactive paints, but this (a) caused the paints to melt fairly quickly and (b) the introduction of water into the paints causes them to dry *much* darker than they appear when first applied. So after a couple of unsatisfactory false starts with Atelier Interactive, I shelved them... Having now used Golden's product in a different manner (see below), I could perhaps give the AI products another try.]

Fortunately, Golden provides at least a decent amount of information on their web site to get you started, although hopefully over time more information will be published about tips for using these paints to their best advantage. I would recommend than anyone interested in using the paints read the technical application page.

This time, rather than use a "wet" Stay-Wet Palette, I tried a more "traditional" approach. I laid down a piece of gray paper into a dry Stay-Wet tray and put a sheet of glass on top of it -- no sponge, no water underneath. This provided a nice neutral gray palette for mixing paints. In between painting sessions, I gave the palette a light spray of a mixture of water and the OPEN Thinner product, plus I put a folded paper towel moistened with water into the tray and sealed the palette with the cover. I don't know if this was necessary, but the paints definitely do stay open this way and they don't melt! (However, after a couple of days, some of the thin paint mixtures on my palette dried up a bit and weren't quite as workable, even after adding some Thinner.)



I've never done any painting with oil paints so I can't accurately compare the feel of the Golden products with oils. However, straight from the tube, these paints stay open on the canvas *much* longer than regular acrylics. I don't think I could go in five hours later and just start blending away, but it is much easier to do blending, create soft edges, and adjust tones to already applied paint with these paints than it is with Golden's other products, which dry so very fast.

To prepare the support, I started with an inexpensive pre-gessoed, pre-stretched cotton canvas and covered this with a layer of Golden GAC-100 followed by a coat of Liquitex gesso. (I don't normally do this, but wasn't sure how absorbing the canvas would be, so I figured I'd sort of provide an isolation barrier with the GAC-100 (as mentioned on the Golden web site for prepping wood supports); I like Liquitex Gesso for its ease of application and generally smooth finish.)

I then toned my canvas with *regular* Golden heavy body acrylics (in this case, I mixed a blueish gray with ultramarine blue, burnt umber, and Liquitex gesso). I made a drawing of the still life using a water-soluble pastel pencil (Stabilo), which I find works well and is easy to wash off later if necessary. (In the image below, I've Photoshopped the canvas a bit to try to make the white drawing appear more clearly, so the canvas color is off a bit.)




I then began working on the painting proper. I had purchased both of the small trial paint sets which are split up into "Traditional" and "Modern" colors, as follows:

MODERN COLORS
Hansa Yellow Opaque (PY74)
Quniacridone Magenta (PR122)
Pyrrole Red (PR254)
Phthalo Green BS (PG7)
Phthalo Blue GS (PB15:4)

TRADITIONAL COLORS
Indian Yellow Hue (PY73/PY150/PR206) -- curious combination of Hansa, Nickel Azo, and Quin B.Orng
Alizarin Crimson Hue (PR122/PR206/PG7) -- Quin Magenta, Quin B.Orng, Phth Green BS combo
Ultramarine Blue (PB29)
Sap Green Hue (PR101/PY150/PG36/PBk7) -- Red Oxide, Nickel Azo Yellow, Phth Green YS, Carbon Black
Van Dyke Brown Hue (PR101/PBk7) -- Red Oxide, Carbon Black

The tube sizes in these trial sets are 3/4 oz and all colors are Lightfastness I. Both sets come with Titanium White, and I also bought a tube of Carbon Black (I don't normally use black, but this came in handy when I needed some really dark darks, or for making a gray to help dull down some other colors). Putting both sets together made a pretty decent full palette, although it's not the set of colors I would choose if I were picking all of the colors independently.

I had initially planned on painting the darks first in my still life, but because I didn't really yet trust the ability of the paints to stay open, I instead started working "object by object" through the painting. So, I first worked on the red onion and was very, very happy with the blending properties of the paints! It was very easy to smoothly blend colors on the canvas, especially once I switched to a very soft flat brush (instead of the filbert I had been using to lay on the paint).



I didn't have any issues with the "pigment load" of these paints, although some of these colors are quite transparent (even the Hansa Yellow Opaque isn't that opaque). In the future, I think I might lay down some local color over the toned canvas using regular Golden arcylics, perhaps made opaque with some gesso or white paint.

In between painting sessions (as described above), I squirted some water/thinner onto the palette and sealed it closed with the palette cover. When I returned (as long as a day and a half later), all of the paint blobs squeezed from the tubes were still completely workable, though some of the thin mixtures of paint had dried somewhat. For the most part, I could re-activate these by adding some Thinner and scrubbing it into the paint, although this paint didn't handle quite the same as when it was fresh.

I've often seen oil painters "wipe off" sections of their paintings, even days after the paint was laid down. I don't think you can really do this with the OPEN Acrylics. You can wipe the paint off very shortly after it's been applied, but after it starts to tack up you'd need to use some thinner and then very carefully (I think) scrub it off (although I didn't try this). After it had dried for a day or two, I don't think you could easily wipe off any of the paint, though it would be easy to paint over.

To summarize, I think these paints are very cool! They aren't magic, but I think with some more experience it'll be pretty easy to strategize work on a painting to best take advantage of their properties (e.g., use regular acrylics for toning and perhaps local color). I will continue to use them for representational work and am going to give them a try on an upcoming portrait painting (though I'll probably want to add a few tubes of other colors for this -- ah, another excuse to go to the art store...). I hope you find this summary helpful!

Here's the final painting...



-Andrew Werth
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Old 07-24-2008, 02:26 PM
theonoe theonoe is offline
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Andrew,

Thanks for this detailed report! You've given me some good ideas for when I am able to try these paints!

Theo
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Old 07-24-2008, 02:56 PM
Nilesh Nilesh is offline
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Great report. Thank you.

***
"However, after a couple of days, some of the thin paint mixtures on my palette dried up a bit and weren't quite as workable, even after adding some Thinner."

It would be interesting to hear how it works when adding the liquid medium instead of the thinner.

(As I understand it, after a long enough period of time it is better to use the medium than the thinner, to restore the paint to something close to its original handling characteristics.)
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Old 07-24-2008, 03:57 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Andrew, thanks so much for posting your process and pics, and for that link to the tech page. I thought I'd read everything they had on their site re OPENs, missed this, and it's got some very good guidelines and issues raised, with more explanation than I'd seen so far. I appreciate it.
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Old 07-24-2008, 05:03 PM
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tbezesky tbezesky is offline
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Wow Andrew great work! Very enlightening!
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Old 07-24-2008, 05:08 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

I have been working on a little still life too.

Here is a link to the You Tube Demonstration of the painting.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Ki6Lxh1bnU
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Old 07-24-2008, 05:19 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

very cool video demo, Tracy, thank you!

my check-in: I am liking the OPEN Acrylic Medium for thinning the paints down, so far I am not having the problems with lifting I was having with just water...
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Old 07-24-2008, 07:55 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Sure, water will weaken any paint film. I have used the medium to blend into parts I painted the day before, on some pictures.
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Old 07-24-2008, 10:19 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbezesky
Sure, water will weaken any paint film.

Yeah, I've seen tons of debate on WC about how much you can water it down without destroying adhesion, but in practice, I paint with dirty water all the time and it works just fine for me, I go over and over the layers and they stay put. That's why I did it with the OPENs, but water does NOT work with them...

I am *really* liking this OPEN Acrylic Medium, though, and I read today you can use it to go back into an area and blend, as you said. I've been doing that all afternoon and loving it...I'm glad I got some, I initially avoided it because of the gloss, but it's not that bad at all, just gives the paint a nice sheen...(btw, in an earlier post, I said I thought the thinner adds gloss, it does not, according to the label. Just the medium and gel add gloss...)

OK, I doubt anyone would be this brazen, but after having this stuff stay wet on the palette for DAYS without even covering it, I pushed things some more, and let me just let ya know, if you want your paints to stay open on the palette, and wet on your canvas, do not sit directly under a ceiling fan! However, if you want to speed things up, and get to that thick impasto paint consistancy Jamie was raving about, a fan is the way to go! I'm actually kind of enjoying it, I've got my fast working time, but can re-open to blend with the medium when I want to...but now I'm back to having my paint dry on the palette! Although, unlike trad. acrylics, they can be reworked quite a bit... I'll figure this out yet...
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Old 07-24-2008, 10:28 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

And this is still in a sloppy stage, it was just a study, so not sure if I'll be working on it anymore, but I have to say I enjoyed it...finally! Up to this point, these OPENs had been an exercise in frustration...one of those frustrations was unexpected transparency, so today I just went with it, and painted stuff that's transparent!

this is about 6x6, OPENs on watercolor paper
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Old 07-24-2008, 10:46 PM
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Re: Experiments with Golden Open

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nilesh
It would be interesting to hear how it works when adding the liquid medium instead of the thinner.

(As I understand it, after a long enough period of time it is better to use the medium than the thinner, to restore the paint to something close to its original handling characteristics.)

Hi Nilesh,

As an experiment, I went back to my palette which I hadn't touched for two or three days. All of the paint that I had squeezed directly out of the tubes were still completely "juicy" and workable. The thick mixtures of colors on the palette were also still completely open and ready to go. In those cases where I had mixed just a small amount of different colors and mixed them out thinly on the palette with a brush had become "touch dry".

I tried both the Thinner and the Medium to see how they did. Both of them were able to open up these touch dry mixtures without any problem, only requiring some brushwork to mix it all up into a decent consistency. But, as you would expect, the additives change the handling, texture, and transparency of the mixtures. The Thinner made the re-opened paint more watery, while the Medium made it more like a thick fluid acrylic, and both made the paints more transparent (no surprise there). I wouldn't say the Medium takes it back to it's original handling characteristics, but it does make it thicker than if you reopen with the Thinner.

This behavior is all pretty easy to figure out and work with so it's no problem. I know now that if I have a precise color mixture that I want to keep around for a few days (and keep the "normal" handling characteristics), I should mix up enough for it to stay thick on the palette.

-Andrew
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