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Old 06-06-2018, 09:49 PM
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DAK723 DAK723 is online now
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

When Bill Alexander put the paints on his palette, they were so thick that he used to turn his palette upside down and the paint just stuck!

In other words, for this technique, the paint is thick when initially applied. Paint is mixed with either the knife or brush. There are no puddles on the palette.

When an initial layer of paint has been applied - let's say a dark green for a tree silhouette - then paint may need to be thinned to get the next "layer" to stick to the initial layer. In those cases, a small amount of the liquid white (which is quite thin) is added to the paint pile. These paint piles, while thinner, are still not puddles, although perhaps the look like they are on your screen.

Hope this helps,

Don
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Old 06-07-2018, 08:17 AM
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DAK723
There are no puddles on the palette.

Don
Oops...I probably sent some folks down the wrong road with my use of the word "puddles'...It is intended as 'descriptive' only, to differentiate a perceived/observed difference between the paint as I squeezed it out onto my palette and the paint I observered Bob Ross working with...Mine, lay there rolls on the palette, defying me to do anything with them...Bob's lay in inviting wider (sorry...got to go there again..) puddles inviting me to jump in...Sorry...try though I might, I cannot get away from the word 'puddles'...not puddles of water though...puddles of a thick substance...(staying away from the word 'mud' as well...a bad word in oil color work...) Maybe I'll shut up before I get myself in deeper...
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Old 06-07-2018, 08:24 AM
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DAK723 DAK723 is online now
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

If Bob Ross's paint appears to be wider and more spread out, it means that he either used a knife or brush to widen and spread it out.

And...it matters not one bit what your paint looks like when it sits on your palette. Don't worry about it!

Don
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Old 06-07-2018, 09:55 AM
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

I'm with Don on this, although this thread has been very informative regarding just how common using mediums and thinners is (I figured it was just something a few people did as needed, but it's evidently quite foundational for many techniques.) Mack, my paint comes out of the tube like toothpaste, and so it remains until I flatten it out into a Bob Ross-looking puddle with a knife. And it sticks to the pallette in any position with no problem at all. I'm sure I'll venture into mediums and thinners sooner or later, but as someone with a fairly reactive form of asthma, I'm in no rush (thinning chemicals are a lot harsher than oil paint chemicals)
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Old 06-08-2018, 05:19 PM
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

Many experienced oil painters began their careers by using the Bob Ross method, myself included.

As a beginner to oil painting, you need to keep in mind that Bob's method of painting involves a series of "formula methods", and "recipes for success", that, if followed, will usually lead to a rather acceptable oil painting.

Not only should his methods be followed as closely as possible, but this use of his paints is quite important, because they have been formulated to perform properly with his specific formula method of painting.

The first paints applied are generally the more viscous, stiff paints, and subsequent layers of lighter, more colorful paints are usually the more "juicy", liquid, less viscous paints. Bob's statement that "A thinner paint will stick to a thicker paint," means that a more liquid paint (the uppermost, more colorful, lighter paints) will stick to a stiffer, more viscous paint, which usually includes his darker colors (which are more stiff in consistency, right out of their tubes).

That Bob Ross video that someone posted answers most of the questions that many beginners generally ask, I believe.

Bob's method is based upon a given set of operations, that, if performed relatively properly, will yield an acceptable painting.

Holding the brush, or the knife in a given manner, with the brush "loaded" with paint, or with the proper "roll of paint" on the edge of the knife, as Bob suggests, and applying the paint in the manner that Bob suggests, "Two hairs, and some air", for example, are just a few of the "formula methods" that will yield a standard, Bob Ross appearing painting.

Within about 6 or 8 paintings, performed in a Bob Ross manner, the typical oil paint beginner begins to become bored with the method. The reason is that once learned well, the operations create the same exact appearance from painting to painting. In other words, once you have learned the techniques successfully, it simply doesn't get any better--that is as good as it will ever get. It is usually after a few paintings that most beginner oil painters begin to seek different methods, so as to be capable of expanding their methods to include other effects, and to paint other subjects.
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Old 06-10-2018, 08:02 AM
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

Thanks for the encouraging words, my questions did get answered... WF: I am using Bob Ross paints...(Bob Ross brushes too...)Have not experminted with other brands...(I assume there are differences..but that is an issue for later) Had a touch of something the last few days so have not been doing much of anything ...my doctor, over at the VA clinic, (I'm a veteran who is actually, for the most part, very happy with my VA service) checked me over..found nothing major but wants me to have a test next week...But hopefully I will back to trying to paint in a day or two...
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Old 06-14-2018, 04:36 PM
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ptrkgmc ptrkgmc is offline
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

I use my fingers, palms and scrub that tooth paste!!!! Rarely do I employ a medium. Blegh!
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Old 06-14-2018, 06:17 PM
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Re: Really stupid question, or maybe not, depending on your point of view...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ptrkgmc
I use my fingers, palms and scrub that tooth paste!!!! Rarely do I employ a medium. Blegh!

Based on the pigment list which you provided in another thread, it seems that you use non-toxic pigments (good for you). Based on the list of colors offered by Bob Ross (for which I did not locate detailed pigment data), it seems that these are non-toxic (the Cadmium Yellow is probably a hue). But it is always advisable to check, before finger-painting.
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