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Old 12-10-2016, 12:29 PM
Mazaleena Mazaleena is offline
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Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

I'm sure many of you have seen the stunning acrylic pours of Nancy Wood and Arthur Brouthers to name just a couple. The hook to their creation is the blooming cells and webbing or lacing effect. Much of it has to do with different viscosity of paint (thinning with water) and how colors react with each other. I have been experimenting endlessly and going through MUCH paint. I can get beautiful cells, but within 15 minutes they disappear. I do understand that Wood's and Brouther's beautiful prints are macro photos of the developing process but I have seen some hard copy canvas where the cells and webbing ARE in tact. So is this just a 'kodak' moment or is there a way to keep the cells from disappearing? I will be experimenting with different paint this weekend. I hear you can NOT get the cells with Golden, so will be trying another brand. No, I don't want to use alcohol or diluted dish soap. Apparently it can be done with just acrylic, water and even adding ink. If anyone can shed any light on this process / technique love to hear. Thanks in advance. I'm new to the forum, so if this technique has been brought up before - pls let me know. Keep on Arting every1!
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Old 12-11-2016, 02:55 AM
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Eraethil Eraethil is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

This young artist has shared her materials and has a successful approach. Hope it helps:

https://www.youtube.com/user/MelYDM1431
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:19 AM
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

I found a video where presumably physicists (presumably) explain why the cells occur. It has to do with the relative density of the pours. There must be a way to control the densities with maybe water or pouring medium to systematically achieve predictable stable results. Some pigments are denser than others but maybe there is a way to work around the pigment densities and focus on the densities of the mediums? Anyway here's the study:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53kc8QoCohU

excerpt from video description " This video shows an analysis of the 'accidental painting' technique developed by D.A. Siqueiros, a famous Mexican muralist. We reproduced the technique that he used: pouring layers of paint of different colors on top of each other. We found that the layers mix, creating aesthetically pleasing patterns, as a result of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Due to the pigments used to give paints their color, they can have different densities. When poured on top of each other, if the top layer is denser than the lower one, the viscous gravity current undergoes unstable as it spread radially. We photograph the process and produced slowed-down video to visualize the process"
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Last edited by Artchrispy : 12-11-2016 at 09:24 AM.
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Old 12-11-2016, 11:06 AM
Mazaleena Mazaleena is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

Eraethil - I have looked at that video and their study a Trillion times. Artchrispy I have followed all of MelyD's videos and she IS producing the cells 'live' but when I check her site to inspect the finished product (after drying) I notice that there are very few cells so I'm assuming most of hers dissolve through the drying process too. Maybe it is something that can only be captured in photography. Well, back to the drawing board as they say. Maybe my paint is too thin. Maybe I'm chasing the elusive. Am going to experiment with another brand of acrylic this week. Thank you for comments.
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Old 12-11-2016, 02:08 PM
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

If it makes you feel any better, the mechanism at work touches upon fluid dynamics, which Einstein proclaimed was well beyond his reach :-)

I would suggest, take careful note of your process and note when the cells you like form. Did they progressively disappear with "drying"? Try another set up, but stop half way, two-thirds into the process and see if the "drying" process creates the cells, rather than creating cells and then have "drying' fully mix the cells you desire away. Change only one variable at a time in your tests. Same mixes, just change timing as I've just suggested. Then again with everything the same, only one other thing changed. Great fun!

Also, yes the process is created in part by differing density, but the process is slowed down by differing viscosity (two different things) ~ and that's certainly true in liquids, but paints contains particles as well and they contribute a whole other suites of complex physical processes. Different pigments in paint have different specific gravity, and by their differing nature the pigment is in different "media" i.e. binder etc. So carefully observing what happens with each paint itself.

Good luck!

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Old 12-11-2016, 02:22 PM
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

The only way to keep a documentation of the cells is to photograph them.

The squireios video is also from live paint. Interesting when it happens but ho-hum when dry
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Old 12-11-2016, 07:55 PM
Mazaleena Mazaleena is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

Good advice Red. I'm guilty of impatience when it comes to watching paint dry. And indeed cells do develop during the drying process, some stay but many morph into a regular old paint pour - because even though it doesn't appear to be moving anymore - IT IS. Come back 20 minutes later and... Maybe - I should damn the sides to prevent movement. That may help.
Thank You

Quote:
Originally Posted by KolinskyRed
If it makes you feel any better, the mechanism at work touches upon fluid dynamics, which Einstein proclaimed was well beyond his reach :-)

I would suggest, take careful note of your process and note when the cells you like form. Did they progressively disappear with "drying"? Try another set up, but stop half way, two-thirds into the process and see if the "drying" process creates the cells, rather than creating cells and then have "drying' fully mix the cells you desire away. Change only one variable at a time in your tests. Same mixes, just change timing as I've just suggested. Then again with everything the same, only one other thing changed. Great fun!

Also, yes the process is created in part by differing density, but the process is slowed down by differing viscosity (two different things) ~ and that's certainly true in liquids, but paints contains particles as well and they contribute a whole other suites of complex physical processes. Different pigments in paint have different specific gravity, and by their differing nature the pigment is in different "media" i.e. binder etc. So carefully observing what happens with each paint itself.

Good luck!

Cheers
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Old 12-11-2016, 08:01 PM
Mazaleena Mazaleena is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

You may be absolutely correct Lady and a good camera is on my wish list. In order to blow up large prints - guess I would require something above 28mp?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Carol
The only way to keep a documentation of the cells is to photograph them.

The squireios video is also from live paint. Interesting when it happens but ho-hum when dry
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Old 12-11-2016, 10:04 PM
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

I have tried all sorts of things to get lace and holes. I have had some success but not a lot, overall
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Old 12-14-2016, 09:15 PM
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

What about adding lace or creating cells after the fact? One technique would be to use a knife to create indents or grooves in the dry paint film in the desired lace pattern and then running ink thru the grooves. Or would that feel like cheating? Artists sometimes score lines into papers to let paint or ink settle into the lines. Why couldn't that technique work in this context?
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Old 01-14-2017, 05:07 PM
Mazaleena Mazaleena is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

Just wanted to thank you KolinskyRed. Your suggestion of stopping halfway & 2/3rds throughout with recorded observation was constructive. And how important is it to keep a logue of each experiment !
Not ready for the BIG substrate yet, but getting closer. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KolinskyRed
If it makes you feel any better, the mechanism at work touches upon fluid dynamics, which Einstein proclaimed was well beyond his reach :-)

I would suggest, take careful note of your process and note when the cells you like form. Did they progressively disappear with "drying"? Try another set up, but stop half way, two-thirds into the process and see if the "drying" process creates the cells, rather than creating cells and then have "drying' fully mix the cells you desire away. Change only one variable at a time in your tests. Same mixes, just change timing as I've just suggested. Then again with everything the same, only one other thing changed. Great fun!

Also, yes the process is created in part by differing density, but the process is slowed down by differing viscosity (two different things) ~ and that's certainly true in liquids, but paints contains particles as well and they contribute a whole other suites of complex physical processes. Different pigments in paint have different specific gravity, and by their differing nature the pigment is in different "media" i.e. binder etc. So carefully observing what happens with each paint itself.

Good luck!

Cheers
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Old 05-31-2017, 11:32 PM
selbygirl selbygirl is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

Try Chris Cross videos on Youtube for creating cells.
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Old 06-01-2017, 04:47 AM
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

To create cells I've seen the artist use a torch (like the cooking ones) over the poor, so it changes the density of the paint with the heat.
Hope it helps
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Old 06-01-2017, 04:02 PM
jennifervs jennifervs is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

I've been playing with pours a bit lately. One thing about Arthur (whose work is amazing, is that he acheives" “fluid like cells”, with the use of acrylic paints and other chemical agents. In his figurative works, these unconventional methods are used as bottom layers or the “skins” of his subjects. Arthur uses anywhere from 4 to 15 layers of clear resin between layers of acrylic paint, pigmented inks, and spray paint to show depth, giving a 3D effect."

So you may need want to consider, in addition to pouring mediums and a heat source, agents like silicone or Floetrol. Also note that he uses resin in between layers. Not only would that create a clear barrier for the next layer, pouring onto resin will yield different effects than pouring onto gesso, paper, a panel, or more paint.

Notes are key. So is a lot of paint . If I can manage "big cells" I will let you know! The best I've had were small ones.



FYI just be extremely careful with a heat source and these oils. Some will have fumes that can be flammable.
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Old 06-01-2017, 05:23 PM
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cliff.kachinske cliff.kachinske is offline
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Re: Fluid acrylic pours - cells & lacing

Be careful with silicone. It gets everywhere (really, everywhere). It interferes with glue joints and causes fish eye effects in paint films.
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